Skip to main content

Full text of "The ... Falcon"

See other formats


WILBRAHAM PUBLIC LI 



AlSflOl 3MS21 



ALL WRAPPED t 






^tBrar, 



rj 




c 




All Wrapped Up 

Take time to LOOK WHAT'S UNDER THE LID 

STUDENT LIFE 4 

See why we have NO TIME TO SPARE 

ORGANIZATIONS 30 

CAUGHT IN THE MOMENT of victory 

SPORTS 52 

With challenging courses, we've been 
STRETCHED TO THE LIMIT 

ACADEMICS 100 

TIGHT TIES made with the 
bond of friendship 

PEOPLE 118 

SURROUNDED BY ALL of our enthusiastic 
community members 

COMMUNITY 170 






WILBRAHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY 




Wrapped up in his ski 
vest Bill Fridlington 
skis down the Con- 
necticut River just north of 



Northampton. While Jim 
Blondek commandeered the 
boat, Ted Furst photo- 
graphed his friend. 



TITLE 1 



In Miss Brewer's 
Senior Seminar, 
Roger Brunelle 
plays Ringo Starr. Roger 
performed as the Beatles' 
drummer in his media pro- 
ject. 

fter a day spent 
wrapped up in stud- 
ies, students bust 
out of the school doors. 
Students rush to their bus- 
es for a quick ride home. 



All wrapped up in the 
beautiful fall fo- 
liage, Minnechaug 
stands alone after a hectic 
October school day. 






2 OPENING 



^4 



ALL WRAPPED UP 

he school needed money, and needed it fast 

So there was a June 9 vote and the override passed 

Bye to Prop. 2 1/2 and budget cut slaps 

For one more year finances were under wraps. 

eachers were swamped with evaluation work 

I 

Their wrapped-up time almost made them go berserk 

Students were relieved to get their work done 

With their work wrapped up, they could go out and have fun. 

ut the work was never complete; there was always more 

Students found academic pressures to be the same as before 

The time spent in school was too much to take 

But then the weekend would come for that needed break. 

t wasn't just academics; there was the extracurricular pull 

With all this to do students' lives were never dull 

Before the year's end students made a silent vow 

Things at school would be All Wrapped Up, for now. 




On Halloween, Keely 
Fitzgerald, Jenn Lu- 
carelle, Kerry Man- 
ning, and Anne Berte mock 
evaluating team members. 
The NEASC evaluation end- 
ed on Halloween. 



OPENING 3 




At the September pep 
rally, the senior 
class watches the 
competition between the 
boy and girl captains. Many 
seniors were clad in green 
to support their class color. 



4 STUDENT LIFE DIVIDER 



LOOK WHAT'S UNDER THE LID 





tudents, as usual, wanted to have fun 

But there was less money available to get it done 
Becuase businesses had money to pinch 

Getting a job was no longer a cinch. 

Tf there wasn't much for the choosing 
students decided to just go cruising 
Occasionally they would stop to do something "groovy" 
Like stop at the mall or go to a movie. 



or a Key Club member or Drama Club actor 
Time, as always, was a factor 



F 



Each student was a quick learner 

Fun would often take the back burner. 

f—% tudents began to understand the high school myth 

There is much to do and many to do it with 
Take a moment to see what they did 

That's right. LOOK WHAT'S UNDER THE LID! 



STUDENT LIFE DIVIDER 5 



THE GROUP was fortunate 
enough to spend time in Ox- 
ford shopping and visiting col- 
leges. Posing after a tiring 
Wednesday are Kara Perkins, 
Tara Reavey, Amy Liese, and 
Lori Toman, Betsy Leritz, Kim 
Ingram, Kurt Ingram, Misty 
Foss, Alexis Heede, Seth Hed- 
lund. 



ALEXIS HEEDE carefully 
watches her footing as she 
walks across the top of the ca- 
nal boat. Alexis had to balance 
herself to keep from falling 
head-first into the water. 




AFTER ROLLING THE 
TARP BACK to let in some 
sun, Betsy Leritz smiles for the 
camera. Many people got sun- 
burns because of the uncov- 
ered boats. 




6 ENGLAND 



NESTLING ATOP one of 
the boats are Tara Reavey, 
Lori Toman, Misty Foss, Kim 
Ingram, and newfound friend 
Cherry. Since the morning 
came quickly, the England 
afloaters were up bright and 
early enjoying British Coffee. 



AMY Liese and Becky Gibb 
smile before opening a lock. 
Days were spent on the canals 
winding and opening locks. 




,jft« 





Afloat 



Spending two 
weeks of their pre- 
cious summer in 
England gave stu- 
dents an experience 
of a lifetime 



The eleven 
Afloaters were 
shocked when 
they first arrived in Eng- 
land, but after the first 
night passed, those canal 
boats became our home 
away from home. We saw 
everything you're sup- 
posed to see and more. 

We saw so much that 
we will remember for- 
ever, but there are other 
things that we smile 
about as we look back on 
the trip. Who could for- 
get the day Seth Hedlund 
knocked his glasses into 
the canal? Betsy Leritz 
lost everything but her- 
self in the canal, and Kim 
Ingram got to know the 
canals after she fell in 
twice. 

Becky Gibb certainly 
didn't like the bedding 
situation. Tara Reavey, 



our navigator, jumped in 
the "inviting" water 
along with Alexis Heede, 
who befriended many 
English children. 

Amy Liese worked so 
many locks her hands al- 
most fell off. Kara Per- 
kins was well prepared 
with everything from 
home except her bed. 
Kurt Ingram enlightened 
us all with his translations 
of American-English 
terms while Lori Toman 
had her numerous shop- 
ping sprees. No one will 
forget Mr. Bernstein's 
embarrassing us all by 
wearing a dish towel over 
his head. 

All who went to Eng- 
land had a memorable ex- 
perience. On the night 
before we left, we all 
came close to burning our 
passports! 



NOTABLE 

NEWS 

September 3, 1990 

School bus cuts raise safety fears. 

September 11, 1990 

Evelyn Murphy quits governor race and 
supports Frank Bellotti. 

September 15, 1990 

Gulf crisis pushes up inflation, Iraquis 
raid embassies in Kuwait. 

September 29, 1990 

Cincinnati Reds clinched the Western 

Division championship in the National 

League. 

October 2, 1990 

At least 132 people were killed when a 
hijacked Chinese jet crashed into two 
other planes while attempting to land. 

October 8, 1990 

David H. Souter was sworn in as the 
nation's 105th Supreme Court justice. 



ENGLAND 7 



THE THRILL of waterskiing 
is not limited to students. Mr. 
Kibbe shows his experience on 
Big Alum Lake in Sturbridge, 
Mass. 




NOTABLE 

NEWS 

September 15, 1990 

Gulf crisis pushes up inflation, Iraquis 
raid embassies in Kuwait. 

September 1 7, 1990 

President Bush says Iraq is on the brink 
of war. 

September 20, 1990 

John Silber, Democratic candidate for 
governor, and William Weld, the Repub- 
lican candidate, meet campaign backers 
in Boston. 

September 22, 1990 

FDIC sues Neil Bush, President Bush's 

son, in savings and loan case. 

September 24, 1990 
OPEC is pumping enough oil to allay 
world-wide energy shortages at least until 
winter, estimates show. 







:£**• 



WIND blowing in his face, 
Ted Furst demonstrates his 
skill on the Connecticut River. 




■. P 



8 SUMMER 




un In 
The Sun 



Where 
body 
there 's 



there 's a 

of water, 

a body to 



r ide the waves 



Picture this: you're 
in the middle of 
the Connecticut 
River with two gigantic 
boards attached to your 
feet. Five hundred feet 
ahead of you floats Jim 
Blondek's infamous "Pa- 
changa." All of a sudden, 
you feel a tug. Your body 
is elevated and for a split 
second you feel as if you 
have defeated all laws of 
gravity. You surface the 
water. The wind rushes 
through your hair, and 
the sun beats down on 
your face. 

You get caught up in 
the glory when Chris He- 
bert yells, "Cross the 
wakes!" Suddenly, your 
moment of glory is 
broken . . . you're down! 
The boat pulls aside you 
and your friends give you 
a few words of advice. 



Sharon Belcher yells 
out to you "Try one ski!" 
What is she, crazy? Two 
skis are crazy, but one ski 
is just plain dumb! 

You get up again and 
you're doing great, but all 
of a sudden, you're head- 
ing straight for the ramp. 
Your life flashes in front 
of you. At the last possi- 
ble second the boat 
makes a sharp turn and 
the ramp is just a bad 
memory. Tony Tranghese 
leans out of the boat and 
says, "Hey, wasn't that 
fun?" 

For those of you who 
lack the coordination it 
takes to "ride the waves" 
you can find enjoyment, 
as Walter Grono suggests 
and Heather Colclough 
does, "just hanging in the 
boat!" 




WATERSKIING isn't as 
easy as it looks, but Chris He- 
bert shows otherwise in Ver- 
mont. 





CAPE COD cold wouldn't 
stop these sun beauties. Amy 
Currier, Collette Couture, and 
Lauren Troy enjoyed them- 
selves anyway. 

FOURTH of July fireworks 
are a joy to watch. Good 
friends Susan Pierce and 
Diama Cerasa spent the even- 
ing watching the fireworks in 
Hilton Head, South Carolina. 



SUMMER 9 



NOTABLE 

NEWS 

September 25, 1990 

Iraq assailed at United Nations for ag- 
gression; the U.N. Security Council ex- 
tended its land and sea blockade of Iraq 
to include an embargo on air traffic. 

September 26, 1990 

Bush authorized the release of five mil- 
lion barrels of oil from the U.S. Strategic 
Petroleum Reserve. Motion Pictures As- 
sociation of America announced that X- 
rated movies would now be NC-17 (no 
children under 17) 

September 27, 1990 

The College Board reported the average 
cost of a year of college had increased by 
5% to 8% for the 1990-91 year. 

September 29, 1990 

The Cincinnati Reds clinch the National 
League Western Division Championship. 

September 30, 1990 

The Soviet Union established ties with 
South Korea and Israel. Eighty-year old 
Comiskey Park, home of the Chicago 
White Sox, officially closed. 

October 2, 1990 

132 people killed and more injured when 
a hijacked Chinese jet crashed into two 
other planes while attempting to land. 





Whether for a day or 
a week, being to- 
gether with a group 
creates a special 
bond that's hard to 
break 



Tuning 



To pass the time 
during the sum- 
mer or on week- 
ends, students often flock 
to camps or retreats \o 
learn new skills or to just 
hang around with friends. 
This fall, sixteen stu- 
dents attended a retreat 
in Cummington, with 
Youth Fellowship, a time 
to just go away and be 
with friends. The range of 
activities included wiffle 
ball, trailblazing, and 
square dancing. It was a 
chance to have a good 
time with new and old 
friends. 

The yearbook staff 
spent two strenuous 
weeks at workshops at 
Bryant College and Am- 
herst College. They 
learned how to LOOK at 
yearbooks with a critical 
eye and how to improve 



their styles. 

Nina Turcotte's goal 
for the summer was to 
improve her endurance at 
running camp. Kristie 
Kisner, Ali Loper, Amy 
Currier, Kelli Walbridge, 
Christine Sarno, and 
Cara Peck all attended 
various soccer camps. 

The Communication 
Training class spent the 
last weekend of Septem- 
ber on an overnight trip 
to the Moses Scout Res- 
ervation in Russell. Un- 
der the direction of Rob- 
ert Kidd, director of the 
Boy Scout Camp's Pro- 
ject C.O.P.E. (Challeng- 
ing Outdoor Physical En- 
counter), the group par- 
ticipated in fifteen hours 
of group problem solving 
activities designed to 
build communication 
skills. 




WIFFLE Bats flying, Chris 
Tarantino and Chris Hanrahan 
skirmish at the Youth Fellow- 
ship retreat in Cumminton. 



10 CAMPS 



COMMUNICATIONS 

training at its finest. Front: Jen 
Ferrandino, Jen Breton, Pam 
Chase, Eric DeGray. Middle: 
Ann-Marie Zanfagna. Frances 
Truitt, Diane Danthony, Pam 
Zajac. Back: Bill Veideman, 
Joia Davis, Kay-Kay Sutton, 
Becky Takorian, Lori Richter, 
Lisa Anderson, Jen Harring- 
ton, Joe Wilson. 



ARTICIPANTS in the 

outh Fellowship retreat, 
ont: Jenny Arnoman, Todd 
humate, Melissa Dolaher, An- 
ea David, Teri Tousignant. 
ack: Robert Cowles, Rob 



Langdon, Chris Hanrahan, Bill 
Fridlington, Rob McDiarmid, 
Becky Orr, Chris Tarantino, 
Amy~JenRihsoh, Karen" Zahr, 
Bethany Sager. 




CHEERLEADERS exhib- 
it their trophy on the last day 
of camp. Front: Sandy Donnel- 
ly, Kristie Mitchell, Lori Es- 
trada, Kristen Falzone, Amber 
Quist, Kara Ruscio. Back: Erin 



LeRay, Betsy Ross, Coach Lois 
Mitchell, Camp Director Mike, 
Amy Kraus, Lynn Gil, Colleen 
Fitzgerald, Kim Forrant, Nikki 
Bluteau, Wendy Deshais. 



EXAMINING a yearbook 
at the Amherst College work- 
shop, Teri Tousignant and Me- 
lanie Sager critique its style. 



Monica Maltby, Sara Taylor, 
Bethany Sager, and Kara Rus- 
cio also attended. 



CAMPS 11 



FIELD HOCKEY captain 
Jenn Lynch participates in the 
contest. Jenn had to do a foot- 
ball drill during this event. 



ENTERTAINING the 

crowd, girls' soccer performs 
as cheerleaders. This gave 
them a chance to strut their 
stuff. 




12 PEP RALLY 



BEWARE of flying objects! 
Jim Troy vaults in the contest 
with help from Mr. Girotti. 





^motions stirring, 
oices screaming, 
\ands flying, feet 
tomping, eyes 
lancing-what else 
ould it be but a pep 
ally? 



The gym was 
packed, the halls 
and classrooms 
were empty, and the 
whole school, faculty in- 
cluded, was getting 
psyched for the first 
home football game. 
Screams pierced the air 
and confetti flew across 
the old gym floor, mark- 
ing the start of the 1990 
Pep Rally. 

The freshmen had no 
idea what to expect. Liz 
Agnew said, "It was fun 
because we had never 
done anything like this 
before." Breanne 
L'Heureux, another 
freshman, said, "It intro- 
duced the freshmen to a 
whole new part of high 
school life." 

Some said that last 
year's pep rally was bet- 
ter, but even so the obsta- 



CELEBRATING in the 

stands, the senior class shows 
their enthusiasm for the event. 
Many seniors wore green, 
which was their official class 
color for the 1990 pep rally. 



umping 
For Joy 



cle course was received 
with much enthusiasm. 
Some features of the ob- 
stacle course were cos- 
sack jumps, rolling a soc- 
cer ball with one's head 
while blindfolded, bounc- 
ing a ball on the top of a 
field hockey stick, and 
jumping over a gymnas- 
tics horse. 

The pep rally succeed- 
ed in bringing the student 
body together to get 
psyched for the first foot- 
ball game. Junior Chris 
Lynch said, "It gave ev- 
eryone a chance to get 
wild." In fact, many peo- 
ple lost their voices and 
went home with head- 
aches. Was it worth it? 
Yes! Most everyone 
would agree that the tra- 
dition of a pep rally 
should continue. 




NOTABLE 

NEWS 

October 3, 1990 

Iraq president Saddam Hussein makes 
his first visit to Kuwait since Iraq's 
invasion; the Red Sox win the Ameri- 
can League East; David H. Souter is 
appointed to Supreme Court by the 
Senate, 90-9. 

October 5, 1990 

The House of Representatives passes a 
stopgap spending bill to keep the gov- 
ernment running until October 12. 

October 6, 1990 

The Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off 
from Cape Canaveral, Florida, to send 
the Ulysses spacecraft on a surveying 
project to the Sun's polar regions. 

October 8, 1990 

David H. Souter is sworn in as the 
United States' 105th Supreme Court 
justice. 

October 9, 1990 

President Bush holds a news confer- 
ence to discuss the Middle East situa- 
tion; many questions arise about his 
evasion of leadership and his ability. 



BLINDFOLDED while at- 

tempting the girls' soccer ob- 
stacle, Jason Robinson is su- 
pervised by Mrs. Polchlopek. 
While blindfolded, Jason had 
to head the soccer ball across 
the mat. 



PEP RALLY 13 




MISS Royers' kindergarten 
class at Pines School. Front: 
Marybeth Liberty, Courtney 
Ware, Mandy Kober, Kathleen 
Hurley, Karen Cramer, Lynn 
Szczebak, Mary Wallace. Mid- 
dle: Kim Venne, Heidi Solaroli, 
Karrie Murphy, Scott Francis, 
Jason Robinson, Kevin Mor- 
iarty, Tony Beake. Back: Jim 
Anderson, Ralph Dill, Ted Ben- 
ren. 

SCHOOLMATES from 

the beginning, Amber Quist 
and Steve Meisner wait togeth- 
er before school. 

SWIMMING together as a 
relay team for the first time, 
Roger Brunelle, Phil King, and 
Rob Fortier pose in July of 
1981. The three Falcon swim- 
mers competed in the relay 
team championships at Look 
Park in Northampton. 



14 KIDS NOW/THEN 




STAYING together, Roger 
Brunelle, Phil King, and Rob 
Fortier, swam as a relay team 
for the last time in July of 
1990 at the Falcon Summer 
Park and Recreation relay 
team championships. 



NOTABLE 
NEWS 

October 10, 1990 

Roger Clemens is ejected from Game 4 
of the American League Championship 
Series for mouthing off to umpire Terry 
Cooney; the Red Sox were swept in the 
series by the Oakland Athletics. 

October 15, 1990 

Mikhail Gorbachev of the Soviet Union 
wins the Nobel Peace Prize. 

October 21, 1990 
Cincinnati Reds complete 4-game sweep 
of favored Oakland Athletics in the 1990 
World Series. 

October 24, 1990 

Pump price lags behind changes in oil 
market; gas price shows no signs of fall- 
ing despite drop in crude oil prices; self- 
service costs $1.45 a gallon; Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Dole resigns as Cabinet Secretary 
for a Red Cross post. 




V 





eems Like 
Yesterday 



Growing old while 
gro wing toge ther- 
those who can do it 
will feel the rewards 
forever 




rriends, good 
friends, are hard 
to find. But sen- 
iors Scott McFarland and 
Brad Burnette have been 
friends for a long time. 
Scott recalls Brad's annu- 
al "out of school" pool 
parties. "I have many 
memories from those par- 
ties. The countless water 
balloon attacks, water 
polo games, and killer 
basketball games were 
the best parts." Scott has 
also had long-lasting 
friendships with Clay 
Holdsworth and Teri 
Tousignant. 

Three other seniors, 
Rob Fortier, Phil King, 
and Roger Brunelle be- 
gan swimming together in 
1981. Nine years later, 
they are still swimming 




SHOWING OFF their 
smiles, Anne Berte and Keely 
Fitzgerald now dress in their 
own clothes. 



SHOWING OFF their dolls. 
Anne Berte and Keely Fitzger- 
ald dress up in their moms' 
clothes. 



together for the Falcons. 
Kara Welch and Tara 
Daly have been together 
in gymnastics and, be- 
cause of that, they have 
become very close. Kerry 
Manning and Sara Tay- 
lor have remained friends 
since their nursery school 
days at age 4. 

Monica Maltby and 
Cathy Gagnon have been 
friends for ten years. 
Monica says, "We talk on 
the phone almost every 
night for hours, even 
though we see each other 
all day. It's weird." Keely 
Fitzgerald and Anne 
Berte also have been bud- 
dies for years. They both 
recall dressing up in their 
mothers' clothes as little 
girls. Many others have 
also found true, lasting 
friendship. Hopefully, it 
will last through the years 
to come. 

SCHOOLMATES to the 
end, Amber Quist and Steve 
Meisner have still remained 
friends through the years. Now 
they await their separate fu- 
tures in college. 



KIDS NOW/THEN 15 



NOTABLE 

NEWS 

October 26, 1990 

Evander Holyfield defeats Buster Doug- 
las for heavyweight title; Holyfield wants 
to fight George Foreman next; Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts spends $6 mil- 
lion for jail in Ludlow; state welfare 
agency to lay off 100, cut pay of 240; Gulf 
crisis crimps home sales. 

October 28, 1990 

Congress approves budget bill and up- 
holds ban on coastal oil exploration; Bush 
says Pacific Ocean won't be a waste 
dump. 

October 29, 1990 

New England Patriots are off to their 
worst start in twenty years; Minnechaug 
visited by accreditation team. 

October 31, 1990 

A cord of wood costs $125.00. 

November 1, 1990 
Changes in SAT's announced by the Col- 
lege Board. 

November 2, 1990 

U.S. official seeks aid for Palestines. 




xpress 
Yourself 



Daring to be differ- 
ent, students ex- 
pressed themselves 
by dressing in their 
creative costumes 




DR. FEELGOOD'S nurses 
never looked as good as these 
two. Kara Welch and Erica Du- 
til appeared as the nurses that 
Motley Crue made famous in 
their "Doctor Feelgood" video. 



I think that the best 
costumes had to be 
the Minnechaug eva- 
luators," said Jessica Ly- 
don. Keely Fitzgerald, 
Anne Berte, Jennifer Lu- 
carelle, and Kerry Man- 
ning decided to be a little 
more creative in choosing 
their costumes this Hal- 
loween. They dressed up 
as younger versions of the 
evaluation committee 
members, and even vis- 
ited a few classes with 
their clipboards. 

As usual, many stu- 
dents showed their Hal- 
loween spirit by dressing 
in various costumes. They 
ranged from the tradi- 
tional baby to the risque 
flashers. 

'if I had to choose my 
favorite costumes, I 
would choose Kiss or the 



Harry Christeners," said 
Amanda Zepke. Man) 
people agreed with hen 
Chris Hanrahan, Erii 
Schmitt, Matt Nelsonr 
and Dan Truesdall 
looked like the much likk 
the rockers themselves 
"Jed Draper and Pain 
Mikuszewski bangin.i 
their tambourines was 
definite classic," sain 
Christine Logan. Miss 
Brewer even thought thas 
Jed was going crazy! 

Chad Brown and Scoti 
Hapgood looked cool ii 
their '50's costumes' 
Nurses to the rescue wen 
Erica Dutil, Kara Welch! 
and Tara Daly. You ha>a 
to watch out for "nerds^ 
Bill Fridlington and Jet 
Delisle. They might haw 
tripped over you! 




KISS takes a lunch break. 
Chris Hanrahan, Eric Schmitt, 
Matt Nelson, Dan Truesdale 
dressed as the rock group that 
was well-known for its make- 
up. 



DECKED out in his che; 
outfit. Art Tipaldi grabs the ; 
tention of his junior EnglL 
class. Mr. Tipaldi's costum 
are always a favorite amor' 
the faculty and student bod 



16 HALLOWEEN 



Miss Brewer's C Block Sen- 
Seminar, NanHee McMinn, 
d Burnette, and Keely Fitz- 
ald act out Senator 
Carthy's famous 1950's 
itchhunts." It was a mere 
ncidence that the media 
m skits occurred on Hallow- 




WITH BAT earrings and ever- 
ything else unique to a witch, 
Julie Wong enjoys a break 
from spell-binding. 



THE LITTLE MERMAID, 
Heather Brown, spends lunch 
reviewing notes before her 
next class. 



HALLOWEEN 17 



DANCING the night away. Will 
Squeglia and Kim Smith show 
of their smiles during the prom 
at Chez Josef. 

POSING in a friend's car, Dave 
Belcher and Jenn Lucarelle 
take time out for a picture be- 
fore leaving for the prom. 





LONGTIME loves Sue Within, 
ton and Bill Crocker sway I 
the music. 



PROM 




fter 18 years ofdream- 
ig about this night, the 
lass of 1990 finally had 
he chance to put on 
ieir dancing shoes 



on't Forget 
About Me 



The class of 1990's 
prom theme, 
"Don't You For- 
get About Me,' could no 
have been more appropri- 
ate for the occasion. They 
emerged from a line of 
limousines around 6 p.m. 
As each person climbed 
out of the limousines, 
their gowns and tuxedos 
were admired. Both the 
girls and the guys were 
dressed to impress. 
Friends then gathered ex- 
citedly in the lobby know- 
ing that in a few short 
days their relationships 
would have to stand the 
test of times. Many feel- 
ings were present that eve- 
ning, especially that of ca- 
maraderie. 

After posing for prom 
pictures, the spirited class 
of 1990 was seated for an 
outstanding dinner pre- 



pared by Chez Joseph. 
Following this, the eve- 
ning truly began when the 
D.J, Kevin La Croix, 
started playing popular 
hits and the seniors 
danced the night away. 
Nicky Blaser, Diane 
Alves, and Amy Davidson 
seemed to be having an 
excellent time doing the 
electric slide dance while 
the popular hit, "Elec- 
tric," spun on the turnta- 
ble. 

When the music ended 
at 12 a.m, it didn't mean 
the 1990 prom was over. 
The class still stayed to- 
gether and went to after- 
prom parties. The seniors 
just couldn't let go of their 
high school years when 
the prom itself ended. 
They stayed together both 
that night and also the 
next day. 



"r.; : 1 

M 

i I 

HP 


! f'TT 


•'pjj ! ,"" 


; ^^^^W^^^^^l 






ifc, J Wk 


^H ^Kr-^^HH JH 




Ks^W' 


',,£ '^Sl 


*■ ^BEt^a B ,: ^ J 


WW 


fflm 


» - 


nH 


HP 






^H 


K 








HL 


-4 




^JBk 



NOTABLE 

NEWS 

November 3, 1990 

Actress Mary Martin, best known for her 
portrayal of Peter Pan, died at age 76. 



November 5, 1990 

U.S. and Saudis agree on troops com- 
mand. 

November 6, 1990 
Republican William Weld captures the 
governorship of Massachusetts, beating 
Democrat John Silber 846,554 votes to 
821,318; William Bennett is Hampden 
County district attorney. 

November 7, 1990 

Weld fulfills his pledge by scrapping plans 

to build New Braintree prison. 

November 8, 1990 

Jail urged for illegal dumpers; Los Ange- 
les Dodgers sign free-agent Daryl Straw- 
berry for a five-year, $20.25 million con- 
tract. 

November 9, 1990 

President Bush orders more troops to 
Gulf duty; Boston Celtics handed their 
first defeat by the Chicago Bulls, 120-100. 




SHOWING the spirit of the 
senior prom at Chez Josef, 
Stephanie Crivelli, Michelle Duby 
and their dates share a group hug. 



SEATED for a picture: Jeff 
Mendrala, his date, Jen Mendrala, 
her date, Lynn Crafts, Krissy 



Albano, Dawn Mather, Julie 
Crafts, Dan Urledge, Bob Melcher, 
Chris Rocheford, and Julie's date. 



PROM 19 



CONGRATULATIONS are in 
order for these friends. Jen 
Lech, Tom Ruscio, and Earl 
Schofield get together for the 
camera. 



GRAND marshal of gradu- 
ation, junior Teri Tousignant 
solemnly leads the senior offi- 
cers to their place on stage. 

TOGETHER for one last time, 
graduates Cindy Robinson and 
Stacy Wilson pose for the cam- 
era. 






20 GRADL 




't was the best of times, 
t was the worst of times 
— but, most impor- 
antly, it was their time 







m H 



ne Last 
Time 



On the night of 
June 8, 1990, at 
Symphony Hall, 
something special was 
happening: young men 
and women were receiving 
their ticket to life beyond 
high school. 

In the pre-graduation 
program, Mr. Beeler con- 
ducted "El Capitan 
March," among other 
pieces; the choir, led by 
Mr. Drury, performed 
"What a Wonderful 
World" and a medley 
from "Les Miserables." 

The Grand March 
boomed, with soloists 
Scott Wyman and Chris 
Sala, as anxious seniors 
entered the chamber. 
Bryce Whiting's welcome 
speech praised independ- 
ence and diversity of the 
class of 1990. Principal 



Robert Johnson then pre- 
sented the Alumni Hall of 
Fame award to graduate 
Krissy Albano's mother, 
Roberta Albano, class of 
1963. 

Following a vocal selec- 
tion, "Go Out With Joy," 
Katie Razcka compared 
graduation to the begin- 
ning of a new era in a 
touching speech, "Open- 
ing Life's Doors." After 
this Molly Rihm praised 
the green and white and 
the falcon in "Minne- 
chaug Pride." 

The moment had ar- 
rived. Superintendent 
Brian Halloran presented 
the anxious seniors with 
their diplomas. Finally, 
"Pomp and Circum- 
stances" played as the 
class filed out of one of 
life's many doors. 



GIVE A CHEER! Chris Kuselias, 
Ken Kilduff, Noel Smith, and 
Katie Razcka celebrate. 

BUDDIES Ryan Huszar and 
Brent McKinnon show their happi- 
ness after graduation. 



U A- 1 i I W^9r 



NOTABLE 

NEWS 

November 10, 1990 
U.S. seeks showdown for Kuwait; un- 
leaded gas 1.45 at self-service station. 

November 11, 1990 
Mr. David Bernstein honored in Spring- 
field paper for involving parents in their 
children's work by assigning them 
books. 

November 13, 1990 

Saudi Arabian women drove cars to pro- 
test the prohibition on women drivers. 

November 14, 1990 
The Hampden- Wilbraham School Com- 
mittee accepted a donation of computers 
and supplies worth $10,276 from 
Flexcon Company, Inc. 

November 15, 1990 

Students at the Wilbraham Middle 
School were sent home after a water 
main broke on Stony Hill Road. 

November 17, 1990 

JCL won the catapult (shot put) contest. 
Chloris' fourteenth win in fifteen years! 



GRADUATION 21 



NOTABLE 

NEWS 



November 19, 1990 
The music group Milli Vanilli was 
stripped of its Grammy Award after it 
was disclosed that the singers lip- 
synched their album, "Girl You 
Know It's True.'' 

November 23, 1990 
On the day after Thanksgiving, shop- 
pers enthusiastically observed the 
busiest shopping day of the year. 

November 24, 1990 
At the Springfield Civic Center, the 
Villanova Wildcats defeated the LSU 
Tigers, 93-91, in the annual Hall of 
Fame Tip-Off Classic. 

November 25, 1990 
The 68th annual 'Toy for Joy" cam- 
paign to raise money for toys began 
with a goal of $90,000. 

November 27, 1990 
Iraq was issued a command to with- 
draw its troops from Kuwait by Janu- 
ary 15, 1991, before facing U.M. au- 
thorized military action. 

November 28, 1990 

A 30 year old man was trapped for 

more than two hours after falling 

into a narrow, 25-foot deep concrete 

hole under the Memorial Bridge in 

Springfield. 




BECKY BEACOM expresses 
her frustration with co-actor 
Chris Kerbel. Rob Fortier, not 
pictured, played Becky's fa- 
ther. 




resent 
tense 



The Best Play of the 
evening presented a 
realistic scenario for 
today's teenagers 



The One-Acts be- 
gan with some cul- 
ture from the Rus- 
sian play, "Marriage Pro- 
posal." The play was 
about a man, Ivan Vassi- 
livich, played by Chris 
Kerbel, who came to ask 
for the hand of his neigh- 
bor's daughter, Natalia 
Stephanova. Becky Bea- 
com, who played Natalia 
with a perfect Russian 
accent, took the award 
for best actress. Chris 
Kerbel won an honorable 
mention for this play and 
"Adaptation." 

The next play was 
"Sorry, Wrong Num- 
ber," by Lucille Fletcher. 
It was about a sick wom- 
an, played by Katie Lew- 
is, who overheard a mur- 
der plot on the telephone. 
Kellie Raczka won best 
supporting actress for her 
portrayal as a telephone 



operator in this play. 

"Present Tense," se- 
lected best One-Act of 
the evening, opened withh 
Jon Kerbel, who playedt 
Norm Prescott, askingt 
how many of the mem 
bers of the audience were, 
virgins. Jon was selectedc 
best actor and Lisa Lew 
is, who played his girl 
friend, Ann Allen, tookl 
an honorable mention.: 
Charlie Brown won am 
honorable mention for hisi' 
portrayal of Doug Wil-I 
lard, the typical high! 
school jock. 

The final play of then 
night was "Adaptation," 
a game show about life.i' 
Evan Coppola, who* 
played the games' masteri 
as well as Jerry Mel-l 
nicker in "Present 
Tense," won best sup- 1 
porting actor. 




PATIENTLY awaiting the 
judges' decisions are partici- 
pants in the One-Act Festival. 
From left are Rob Fortier, 
Chris Kerbel, Teri Tousignant, 



Becky Beacom. Katie Campi 
bell, John Fernandes, Christinei 
Sarno, Kellie Raczka, and Ge 
nevieve Dutil. 



22 ONE- ACTS 



'YES, a knife will be fine, 
tates" Jon Kerbel who played 
mysterious man who was in- 
olved in a plot to murder Mrs. 
.tevenson. 






WHILE Heather Brown lis- 
tens intently to the complaints 
of Mrs. Stevenson, portrayed 
by Katie Lewis, Kellie Raczka 
casually files her nails. Other 
Sorry Wrong Number cast 
members were Wendy Burk, 
Genevieve Dutil, Teri Tousig- 
nant, Jon Kerbel, and Becky 
Beacom. 

THE ANNOYING Jerry Mel- 
necker, portrayed by Evan 
Coppola, tells his best friend, 
Norm, played by Jon Kerbel, 
that his girlfriend, played by 
Lisa Lewis, is dating another 
guy. Charlie Brown, Hilary 
Brown, and Sarah McGahan 
were other members of the 
cast of Present Tense. 



ONE-ACTS 23 



NOTABLE 

NEWS 

November 29, 1990 
It was announced today that the 51- 
member 173rd Nedical Group, 
based at Westover Air Force Base, 
will leave by the end of the week to 
take part in Operation Desert Shield. 
Their eventual destination is secret. 

November 30, 1990 
Larry Bird, of the Boston Celtics, be- 
comes the fifth NBA player to score 
20,000 points and have 5,000 as- 
sists. 

December 1, 1990 
As part off the federal gas tax, al- 
ready high gasoline prices will be 
raised by five cents. 

December 2, 1990 

The Christmas tree in the center of 

Wilbraham had its annual lighting 

ceremony. 

December 3, 1990 
PVTA estimated they will save 
$96,000 by cutting trips to Wilbra- 
ham. Robert Page, the committee 
chairman, said they will only save 
money in the first year. 




History is much 
more than just a few 
dates 



enior 

Seminar 
s 




enior Seminar, 
taught by Ms. 
Mary Lou Brewer, 
provides an environment 
in which students learn to 
form and vocalize their 
own opinions on a wide 
range of contemporary 
topics, while also respect- 
ing what others have to 
say. The events between 
World War I and the 
Vietnam War make up 
only a small part of the 
class. 

Each week Current 
Events tests are given in 
order to keep the class in 
touch with today's head- 
lines. Also, a Senior The- 
sis is due from each stu- 
dent at the end of No- 
vember, a process which 
helps the pupils prepare 
for "the college environ- 
ment." 



r 

t! 



On October 31, st 
dents put on skits, whiii 
concern any aspect 
American history, calM 
"Halloween Happe: 
ings." The Titanic, Bea 
ties, Al Capone and tit 
Piano Player skits wee 
very popular. 

In November a Twee 
ties Day Dance was hel 
All students were 
quired to dress in 
garb of the era and to 
the Charleston. M 
Bruce Kenney, our res 
dent dance expert, pni 
fessionally judged t 
quality of the dancers. 

Not all of the activitii 
are confined to the claa 
room. Andrea Chechh 
organized a project call! 
"History Cares 
which students shippi 
goods to the soldiers. 




24 SENIOR SEMINAR 



FOUR is definitely not a 
crowd in Senior Seminar. All 
dolled up in Twenties garb are 
friends Jen Lucarelle, Vail Mo- 
sier, Keely Fitzgerald, and Ker- 
ry Manning. 



LOOK AT those faces! Tr 
are seniors Melissa Lutti 
Melissa Burk, Cathy Gagn 
and Vail Mosier acting 
their group skit in Hallow 
Happenings. 



AISS BREWER'S G-Block 
ienior Seminar class poses for 
group photo. The class had 
articipated in its Roaring 
wenties Day. 




A STYLISH Alexis Heede and 
Nate Root enjoy the activities 
of their peers during the Roar- 
ing Twenties Celebration. 



-OOKING very dapper in DRESSED EXTRAVA- 

he style of the Twenties is GANTLY in a variety of twen- 

'athy Gagnon, dancing to a ties styles are Rylan Grant. 

une. Brad Burnette. NanHee 



McMinn, Teri Tousignant, and 
Jed Draper. The five seniors 
are in Senior Seminar, G- 
Block. 



SENIOR SEMINAR 25 



BELONGING to the swirr 
team is not all glory. Jeff King, 
a freshman member of the 
team, spends his well-earnec 
half day practicing the breasi 
stroke. 









THE HALF DAY gave extra 
time to the technical crew of 
the One Acts. The job of pre 
paring the stage for four differ 
ent plays is time consuming 
Without the hard work of the 
behind the scene people 
things would not run as natu 
rally as the do. Cathy Sargent 
student director for the 1989 
production of The Curious Sav 
age, was a member of the tech 
nical crew for the 1990 One 
Act Festival, held on De- 
cember 7th. She spent the 
afternoon of the Half Day 
painting props. 





ENJOYING a leisurely 
game of checkers, Jason Gero- 
mini reacts enthusiastically as 
he makes his move. The half 



day provided time for student 1 
to get together and enjo 
things like board games. 



26 HALF DAY 




xtra 
Minutes 



faif Day! When the 
rords first reach 
ur ears, each of us 
as a different plan. 



T 



he three extra 
hours gained on a 
half day fill the 
minds of all with different 
possibilities. We polled 
students to see how each 
spent the half day of 
school on December 4th. 

Shawn Gralinski fond- 
ly remembered being 
stuck on Rockadundee 
Road after a tire blew on 
Jason Thomas' car. Oth- 
ers did not have such an 
explosive time. Some 
slept, watched television, 
or worked on homework 
assignments. 

Nicole LaPierre went 
over to a friend's house. 
Karen Zahr took her 
friends Bryan Christofori, 
Andrea David, Amy Jen- 
kinson, Trista DeSousa, 
and Jen Little to Pizzeria 
Uno's for lunch. 

Many went Christmas 



shopping, yet there was 
that one elite one, Beth- 
any Sager, who was out 
doing errands for Mr. 
Petzold. Bethany's job 
was to purchase trash 
barrels for the recycling 
centers now located with- 
in the school. 

During the morning 
classes, some of us had to 
endure the constant com- 
plaints of Kellie Raczka 
and Betsy Leritz who 
were "'looking forward" 
to a four and one-half 
hour ski practice. 

Many stayed after for 
practices. They brought 
picnic lunches and ate in 
the hallways as they wait- 
ed to begin. Kara Ruscio 
and Nicole Bluteau had 
cheerleading practice. 
Matt Casey and Mark 
Kulis had basketball 
practice. 



NOTABLE 
NEWS 



December 6, 1990 
Fall Sports' Awards night in the Audi- 
torium 

December 7, 1990 

The 49th anniversary of Pearl Harbor 

December 8, 1990 
Following Saddam Hussein's release 
of all foreigners in Iraq, the first peo- 
ple fly home. 

December 9, 1990 
Although Western Massachusetts 
business owners had permission to 
open before noon today, few chose 
to do so. 

December 11, 1990 
Retirement party for Luella Searles, 
the business secretary in the princi- 
pal's office, and Jeanne Wolford, the 
nurse. 

December 12, 1990 

The first day of Hanukkah, Minne- 

chaug had an all-school Career Day 




RELAXATION fit the bill 
for Jesse Warga and Dave 
Hanks. 



TAKING ADVANTAGE of 
extra work time.Lori Toman, 
Business Manager of the year- 
book, caught up on some re- 
cord keeping. 



HALF DAY 27 



Notable 

News 



December 14, 1990 

A Commerce basketball player shattered 
the Minnechaug backboard today 
postponing the Varsity game. 

December 15, 1990 

The Christmas Semi-Formal from 8:00 
to 1 1 :00 in the cafeteria. 

December 21, 1990 

Last day of school before Christmas 
Vacation. 

December 28, 1990 

The winter's first significant snowfall. 
Forecasters predicted 1 to 4 inches, but 
4 to 7 were reported. 

December 29, 1990 

Its official, after six months of hard 

times, the National Bureau of Economic 

Research has concluded that we are in a 

recession. 

January 4, 1991 

Three history teachers and a few history 
classes traveled to Central High School 
to witness Governor William Weld re- 
enact his inauguration. 

January 16, 1991 
The liberation of Kuwait has begun. 
Operation Desert Shield officially 
became Operation Desert Storm today. 
Indeed, as Thomas Paine stated, "these 
are the times that try men's souls." 




hristmas 
Stress 



CHRISTMAS 

VACATION is 

supposed to bring a 

break from school. 

But for most juniors 

and seniors it brought 

term paper burn out 




The freshmen and 
sophomores had a 
real vacation, but 
most of the juniors and 
seniors had the burden of 
"research papers" hang- 
ing over them all through 
vacation. Christmas Eve 
and Day no one worked 
along with New Year's 
Eve, but the words most 
heard were, "I've gotta do 
my term paper." 

Term papers weren't 
the only thing done. Peo- 
ple exchanged Christmas 
gifts, went to the movies, 
went out with their 
friends, and went to par- 
ties. 

The Wilbraham library 
was filled with students 
doing research for their 
papers. The movie lines 



were longer than usua; 
The malls were packet 
both before and aftfi 
Christmas with peopp 
buying and exchanging 
presents. 

Junior Kim Ingram vi 
ited her relatives am 
worked on her term p,p 
pers. Like many junic 
she had two papers to dd 
Kim says, "I had to tali 
an occasional breaks 
while thinking about til 
many times she went on 
during vacation. 

Many people receive 
lots of clothes for the hoi' 
day. One lucky junior gt> 
a car. On the other sici 
there was Nicole Blutee 
who got some stuff si 
didn't really want. 




LOOKING THRILLED 

about Christmas, Trista deSousa 
and her brother wait for their rela- 
tives to arrive. 



THE COMBINED Trei 

choir, Concert choir, and Madrii 
choir sing America the Beauti 
at the Winter Concert. 



28 CHRISTMAS VACATION 



LEBRATING the holiday 
son, Chris Tarantino and 
in Maltby set up a Christmas 
in the Maltby's livingroom. 





5tei 



C * 



* 



/ 



Br*** 



O' CHRISTMAS TREE, 

O' Christmas tree, how tilted you 
look to me. The deSousa 
family's tree leans over all the 
presents on Christmas day. 

GETTING INTO the 

Christmas spirit the day before 
Christmas vacation, Karen Zahr 
and Bonnie Hanson take time 
out from reading Christmas 
cards, to pose for a holiday 
photo. 



CHRISTMAS VACATION 29 



NO TIME TO SPARE 



eadlines to meet, meetings to hold 

Minnechaug clubs were always going for the gold 
Clubs worked together to strive 
To accomplish the 1990 Food Drive. 

rs. Sager wondered if it would ever wash 
$250,000 of groceries for a new Macintosh 

But whether it was accomplished or not 

At least the students gave it a shot. 



* 



fter hours of hard work and straining 
Peer mediators finished their training 

And it is necessary to mention 

Minnechaug's JCL held the state convention. 

here was much to do in every club 

And no escape from all the hubbub 
With time-consuming activities, students tore out their hair 
One thing was certain: there was NO TIME TO SPARE. 




30 ORGANIZATIONS DIVIDER 




• member of the school After years of nonexistence, 

^ store staff, Rita Trolio the school store was resur- 

grabs a sweatshirt off rected by Jay Deely and the 

rack for a potential buyer. Business Department. 



ORGANIZATIONS DIVIDER 31 



MOST of the Key Club worked 
hard setting up for the twister 
contest. Teri Tousignant, howev- 
er, was caught sleeping on the 
job. 



THE NEW ORDER 




As we all said our sad 
goodbyes to Mike 
Sargent and Chris 
Baer in the lobby of the 
Marriott, the 1989-1990 
Key Club year at Minne- 
chaug came to an end. Dis- 
trict convention, held in 
Springfield, left us with 
great enthusiasm and ex- 
citement for the coming 
year. Minnechaug did very 
well at District, leaving with 
a first place in oratory, sec- 
ond in talent, and a third in 
Outstanding Key Clubber. 

The new year is now un- 
der the direction of Sean 
Campbell, Kristen Falzone, 
Mike Jackson, Teri Tousig- 
nant and Cathy Sargent. 
Recently elected Lieutenant 
Governor, Nicole LaPierre, 
pledged to support her home 







club. All of the officers look 
forward to another great 
year of Key Clubbing at 
Minnechaug. 

Activities for the year in- 
cluded the annual carwash 
and a badminton tourna- 
ment. Members worked to 
help the homeless, volun- 
teering their time at Pros- 
pect House. At Christmas, 
members sold bread at the 
Springdale Mall to profit 
survival centers. Chmura's 
Bakery sold loaves of bread 
to the Club at cost so that a 
greater profit could be used 
to benefit needy people. 

The club meets every 
Thursday night at 7PM in 
the lecture hall. New mem- 
bers are always welcome 
and "dress code is in effect." 

KEY CLUBBER Mike Jackson, 
with a determined look on his 
face, displays his extraordinary 
talent at the Badminton Mara- 
thon. 

IT CERTAINLY WASN'T EASY 
to hang the large sign needed for 
the Twister Contest, sponsored 
by the Key Club. President Sean 
Campbell, however, made the job 
look effortless. 

KEY CLUB. Front: Melissa Do- 
laher, Lauren Troy, Sandra Don- 
nelly, Laurie Delisle, Sean Camp- 
bell, Nicole LaPierre, Mike Jack- 
son, Kristen Falzone, Terence 
Tousignant, Amy Kraus, Lori Es- 
trada, Kellie Raczka. Second: 
Amy Currier, Erin Burke, Alison 
Moore, Catherine Sargent, Kara 
Perkins, Tony Tranghese, Dean 
Rosenthal, Christopher Hebert, 
Wendy Deshais, Christine Sarno, 
Tara O'Connor, Melissa Morse, 
Heather Wholley. Third: Maureen 
Dempsey, Cathy Duffy, Jennifer 
Mackie, Brooke Sperry, Carrie 
Gentile, Kim Ingram, Sherry Deco- 
teau, Andrea David, Kim Wyzik, 
Julie Wong, Wendy Burke, Tina 
Fiore, Kristen Hughes. Fourth: 
Kelli Walbridge, Amy Hitchcock, 
Amy Spear, Elizabeth Leahey, 
Carrie Hapgood, Michelle Ledoux, 
Eric Brunelle, Michael Roberts, 




David Labadorf, Diana Dola 
Jody Michaelski, Betsy Lerit 
Bethany Sager. Fifth: Ann Tara 
tino, Amy Mikuszewski, Ange 
Brunelle, Gretchen Moody, Chri 
tine Logan, Maria Sartori, Eric B 
duch, Cynthia Brescia, Krist< 
Cavros, Mara Gaudette. Sixt 
Jennifer Herbert, Ryan Scott, Kl 
vin Maltby, Chris Tarantino, Ma 
Zaft-Weissman, Tania Fernanda 
Shawn Taylor, Denise Allan 
Amy Jenkinson, Karen Zahr, V, 
cole Boissonnault. Back: Tris 
DeSousa, Bonnie Hanson, Ka3 
Welch, Rachel Morton, Tara Dab 
Monica Maltby, Rylan Gran 
Mary Veideman, Kelly Pincinc 
Back: Michelle Laferriere, Jemi 
fer Shaw, Heather Rothschil 
Misty Foss, Nanhee McMinn. A 
drea Chechile, Courtney Wai; 
Candy Arslanian, Katie Lewis. 



32 KEY CLUB 





"It's a great way to give 
to charity. We have a lot 
of fun and do something 
worthwhile at the same 
time." 

■Mike Jackson. 
Key Club 




"I don't know what to 
say. It's just great. " 

■Cathy Sargent, 
Key Club 




"We got off to a rough 
start, but we're back on 
our feet, having a great 
time." 

■Kristen Falzone, 
Key Club 




KEY CLUB 33 



REAL WORLD, REAL ISSUES 



PREPARING FOR model 

Congress is a lot of work. NanHee 
McMinn, Alexis Heede and Brad 
Burnette show the dedication to the 
club by working overtime. 



If you possess the skills 
for speaking your opin- 
ions, drilling others, and 
fast thinking, Model Con- 
gress is the club for you. 

Model Congress is not a 
"blow-off club to make 
your college applications 
look good. Much work and 
research is put into the club 
by each member, but the re- 
sults can be extremely grati- 
fying. 

Returning members, Pres- 



ident Gerry McMahon, Ro- 
ger Brunelle and Jeremy 
Draper, along with first year 
member Eric Schmitt, repre- 
sented the school as dele- 
gates at American Interna- 
tional College, along with 
observers Andrea Chechile, 
Mary Wallace, Alexis 
Heede, NanHee McMinn, 
Bradley Burnette, Bethany 
Sager, Dean Rosenthal, 
Rebecca Beacom, and Drew 
Forcier. 



No awards were won ad 
AIC, but each student bene- 
fited from the experience, 
Adviser Mary Lou Brewei 
has led the club to numerous 
successes. Although this 
club may not sound fun. j 
most people are surprised al 
the fun they do have, whik| 
also obtaining the important 
skills of speaking, listening j 
to, and questioning different 
points of view. 




34 MODEL CONGRESS 




Mock Law 

FRONT Row: Kara Welch, Andrea 
Chechile, Gerry McMahon. Back Row: 
Courtney Ware, Tara Reavey, Alexis 
Heede. 

Model Congress 

FRONT Row: Bethany Sager, 
Betsy Leritz, Amity Simons, Dean 
Rosenthal. Second Row: Kim 
Ingram, Rebecca Beacom, Mary 
Kotomski, Brad Burnette, Mary 
Wallace, Jeremy Draper. Third Row: 
Cynthia Brescia, Kara Perkins, 
Shawn Gralinski, Matthew Glover, 
Andrew Forcier. Back Row: Tania 
Fernandez, Nanhee McMinn, Gerry 
McMahon, Alexis Heede, Andrea 
Chechile, Courtney Ware. 



Model U.N. 

FRONT Row: Cynthia Brescia, 
Mary Kotomski, Dean Rosenthal, 
Amity Simons, Robert Thorpe. Sec- 
ond Row: Katherine Bresette, Shawn 
Gralinski, Matthew Glover, Brad 
Burnette, Mary Wallace. Back Row: 
Tania Fernandez, Nanhee McMinn, 
Gerry McMahon, Monica Maltby, 
Alexis Heede, Tara Reavey, Jeremy 
Draper. 




IT'S going to be an 
awesome season. We have 
a good team and a new 
system for the people to 
learn what to do in a trial." 
-Courtney Ware, 
Mock Law 




"MODEL Congress is 
more than debate. It's right 
versus wrong. It's life ver- 
sus death. Besides that, it 
really has no meaning. 
Make debate, not war." 

-Jeremy Draper, 
Model Congress 




IT doesn't deserve my 
lack of sleep, but it looks 
good on a college applica- 
tion." 

-Gerry McMahon, 
Model U.N. 




MOCK LAW, MODEL CONGRESS, MODEL U.N. 35 




"We get to decide the 
fate of the student body. 
It gives us the sense of 
being overlords. " 

■Teri Tousignant. 
Student Government 




"I don't have to go to 
study!" 

■Seth Hedlund. 
Library Aide 




"It's great! You get to 
show force to the little 
freshmen and show 
them how things are 
done properly." 

■Matt Nelson. 
PE Leader 




Student 

Government 

Officers 



DIAMA Cerasa, Secretary; 
Alexis Heede, President; Keely 
Fitzgerald, Vice President; and 
Jennifer Lucarelle, Treasurer. 

Student 
Government 

FRONT Row: Diama Cerasa, 
Alexis Heede, Keely Fitzgerald, 
Jennifer Lucarelle. Second Row: 
Amy Currier, Monica Maltby, 
Catherine Oagnon, Robert Fortier. 
Andrew Clines, Vail Mosier, Ellen 
Sullivan. Third Row: Melanie 
Hsaio, Rachel Morten, Kara 
Welch, Tara Daly, Tania Fernan- 
dez, Sarah Hsaio, Amber Quist. 
Fourth Row: Rebecca Beacom, 
Tara Reavey, Candace Arsalan- 
ian, Bridget Baron, Jennifer Little, 
Jennifer Grono, Nicole Bluteau. 
Fifth Row: Rylan Grant, Mara 
Gaudette, Brian Borsari, Terence 
Tousignant, Bonnie Hanson, 
Christopher Lucarelle. Back Row: 
Gretchen Moody, Nicole LaPierre, 
Angus Jennings, Kevin Maltby, 
Amy Smith, Angela Brunelle, and 
Melissa Dolaher. 

Library Aides 

FRONT Row: Angela Hebert, 
Kim Ober, Cate Martin. Second 
Row: Heather Day, Christina 
Scagliarini. Back Row: Deborah 
Dutton, Timothy Grundstrom, 
Chad Graham, Chuck Savoy, An- 
drew Clines. 

Aides and PE 
Leaders 

FRONT Row: Keely Fitzgerald, 
Andrew Clines, Alexander Durzy, 
Cynthia Brescia, Mara Gaudette, 
Trista DeSousa, Phillip King. Sec- 
ond Row: Jennifer Lucarelle, Jef- 
frey Moore, Seth Hedlund, 
Shauna Sutton, Sandra Donnelly, 
Laurie Delisle, Melissa Laraway, 
Tara O'Connor, Christine Vec- 
chio. Third Row: Clarence Martin, 
James Dubord, Jenny Arnoman, 
Pamela Zajac, Sara Valentine, 
Christine Logan. Fourth Row: 
Nina Difilippo, Angela Brunelle, 
Nicole LaPierre, Rebecca Takor- 
ian. Griff Noble, Christopher He- 
bert. Back Row: Jeremy Draper, 
Tania Fernandez, Monica Maltby, 
Teri Tousignant, Vail Mosier, 
Brad Burnette, Rylan Grant. 



^W/j& 
















" ■ 












H - 








PL 1 


H^H 


E Tflfl 




_L 




f 










36 STUDENT GOVERNMENT/LIBRARY AIDES/AIDES AND PE LEADERS 




r 



* he purpose of student 
government is to re- 
present students' 
:ncerns. Each spring, elec- 
>ns are held to determine 
'io will represent the mem- 
:rs of each class. Those 
idents will form a core of 
uders who will help to 
;ild a better bridge of 
:mmunication between 
zdents and faculty. 
Without student govern- 
i;nt, the policies of the 
hool would only reflect 
p views of the faculty and 
iministration. No student 
but would be considered, 
ludents would not be justly 
•presented. 

Student government 
»rked as a team to im- 
:ove the school and to cre- 
)2 a better environment for 
I. The events planned and . 



accomplished by student 
government included the pe- 
rennial courtyard cleanup, 
the second annual home- 
coming dance, and the win- 
ter semi-formal. 

The student government 
is composed of four officers 
and eight representatives 
from each class who attend 
monthly meetings led by 
president Alexis Heede, 
vice-president Keely Fitz- 
gerald, treasurer Jennifer 
Lucarelle, and secretary 
Diama Cerasa. 

At the courtyard cleanup, 
everyone watched in amaze- 
ment as senior class presi- 
dent Brian Borsari battled 
against the forces of nature, 
destroying the tangled and 
ragged bushes that covered 
the sidewalk around the 
courtyard. NanHee 



McMinn and Tania Fernan- 
dez worked relentlessly to 
make the homecoming 
dance a success. 

At the semi-formal 
classes danced to the theme 
of Winter Wonderland on a 
starry night. Mary Wallace 
donated the three-dimen- 
sional silver stars that hung 
amidst the balloon clusters 
in the sky. The organization 
and diligence of the decora- 
tion committee, whose 
members included Nicole 
LaPierre, Chris Lucarelle, 
and Nicole Bluteau, was 
greatly appreciated. 

Thanks to the work of the 
officers, student govern- 
ment was able to involve 
both the student body and 
the community in all of its 
endeavors. 



THE HOMECOMING DANCE 
was a big success. Because king 
David Kozub was in absentia, Bri- 
an Oglesby was given the distinct 
honor of dancing with the queen. 
Vail Mosier. King and queen were 
chosen by ballots done in home- 
room. 

A FLEXED Amy Kraus demon 
strates a back bend to a sopho 
more gym class during the war 
mup before class. Amy is a phys 
ical educational leader for a co 
educational gym class which did a 
unit in gymnastics during the first 
term. 




RECEPTIVE to suggestions 
from his co-workers, Chris Lucar- 
elle asks if the balloon-filled bas- 
ket looks alright. With many other 
student government members. 
Chris helped set up for the suc- 
cessful homecoming dance. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT/AIDES 37 




I don't know. There's 
nothing to say about it. 1 
guess it's alright." 

-Diama Cerasa, 
Madrigals 




IT'S my most relaxing 
class. It's a lot of fun but 
it's also weird because I'm 
the only senior." 

-Monica Maltby, 
Treble Choir 




IT'S an easy way to get 

honors credits. Take me, 

for example, I can't play." 

-Jen Shaw, 

Band 




Madrigal Singers 

FRONT Row: Matthew Nelson, 
Christopher Hanrahan. Second Row: 
Brigitte Pelouze, Megan Kelley, Lisa Lewis. 
Third Row: Diama Cerasa, Katherine Lewis, 
Cathy Gagnon, Heather Brown. Back Row: 
Christopher Tarantino, John Kennedy. 

Concert Choir 

FRONT Row: Catherine Sargent, Alison 
Moore, Leah Kim, Rosemary Kirk. Second 
Row: Courtney Stilarznik, Hillary Brown, 
Kristen Cavros, Pam Zajac, Jennifer 
Herbert, Linda Walling. Third Row: Shauna 
Sutton, Bethany Sager, Jody Michaelski, 
Michelle Zhe, Colleen Fitzgerald, Amy 
Kraus. Fourth Row: Karen McCarthy, Wendy 
Deshais, Melissa Dolaher, Lauren Troy, 
Karrie Murphy, Johanna LaCamera. Fifth 
Row: Renee Gibson, Joshua Skiba, Jona- 
than Hanson, Julie Wong, Elizabeth Childs. 
Back Row: Eric Brunelle, Ryan Scott, Benja- 
min Muldrew. 

Treble Choir 

FRONT Row: Monica Maltby, Julie 
Wong, Elizabeth Tencza, Elizabeth Young. 
Second Row: Vanessa Fernandez, Megan 
Freed, Lauren Raffa, Sara Schofield, Tracy 
Bliss. Back Row: Pamela Zajac, Elizabeth 
Childs. 

Band 

FRONT Row: Maureen Dempsey, Sara 
Valentine, Gretchen Moody, Christine 
Vecchio, Michelle Ledoux, Anne Tarantino, 
Angela Brunelle, Christine Logan, Melissa 
Laraway, Jennifer Mackie, Julie Wong. Sec- 
ond Row: Erica Quinn, Hillary Brown, Lisa 
Marcelynas, Megan Nicoli, Natalie 
Prochnow, Amy Spear, Kevin Maltby, Eric 
Brunelle, Andrew Henshon, Thomas 
Gagnon. Third Row: Derek Gray, Michael 
Jackson, Griff Noble, Jill Gagnon, Jelly 
Pincince, Jarod Vermette, Christopher 
Smead, Kevin Sheran, Adam Winseck, Dan- 
iel Post, Kevin Smith. Fourth Row: Heather 
Brown, Terence Tousignant, Renee Gibson, 
Beverly Burke, Jeffrey King, Stephen 
Piecuch, Neil Eaton, Chris Bopp, Ryan 
Miller. Fifth Row: Robert Fortier, Michael 
Landry, Steven Meisner, Matthew Nelson, 
Kevin Moriarty, Mark Haryasz, Francis 
Truitt, Jill Turcotte. Back Row: Amanda 
Howells, Melissa Burk, Jen Shaw, Heather 
Rothschild, Andrea Chechile, Greg Mascaro, 
Jason Matthews. 



38 CHORUS AND BAND 




ASPECTS OF ... . 



AS A FUND RAISER, the 

band returned to selling oranges and 
grapefruits. Robert Fortier and his 
mother prepared the fruit before the 
pick-up rush. Much fruit had to be 
destroyed because of spoilage, but 
the bulk of it was excellent. 



Like last year, the 
three Minnechaug 
singing ensembles 
id, of course, Mr. Drury, 
rew a concert at the winter 
hool assembly and placed 
r ery member of the audi- 
tce in awe. 

Concert Choir's two ma- 
r successes were "Love 
hanges Everything" from 
spects of Love and a favor- 
i, "Let the River Run" by 
arly Simon. Concert Choir 
abbed the audience's atten- 
)n, and prepared them for 
uch more to come. 
The all-female ensemble, 
reble Choir, presented 
rhe Clouds" and "Sing a 
ibilant Song." The audi- 
ice was still very excited, 
:t their bodies were now 



relaxed against their seats, 
ready for the next part of the 
show. 

The twelve members of 
Madrigals glided onto the 
risers. They jumped off with 
"In These Delightful Pleas- 
ant Groves" and landed with 
"Winter Cantabile." It was 
now time for the Finale. 
With great pride and poise, 
the Concert Choir and 
Treble Choir joined the 
Madrigals in singing "Amer- 
ica the Beautiful." Brigitte 
Pelouze began the piece with 
jazzy taste, and everyone else 
joined in to produce a sound 
that no one could break. At 
that moment the audience 
gleamed with a sense of pride 
— just as the singers were 
doing. 








THE CHORAL GROUPS 

join at the Winter Choral Assembly, 
to give another strong performance 
for their classmates. Many of the 
songs they sang were from their ear- 
lier Winter Concert in which Renee 
Gibson sang a solo from America the 
Beautiful. 

FRANCES TRCIITT made 

District by excelling on the string 
bass. She participated in the Senior 
Festival at CJMass on January 1 9 with 
Heather Brown, Ken Wegiel, Steve 
Meisner, Jarod Vermette, Chris 
Smead, Amanda Howells, and 
Andrew Henshon. 




CHORUS AND BAND 39 




ALL around, the Drama 
Club shows how a profes- 
sional production would 
work." 

-Michael Jackson, 
Drama Club 




IT'S a club where stu- 
dents from all grades can 
get together and have a 
good time without the fear 
of not being accepted." 

-Katie Campbell, 
Drama Club 




"INTERNATION- 

AL Club has been the one 
extracurricular I've been in- 
volved with for 4 years. I'd 
like to leave it with a leg- 
acy." 

-Andrea Chechile, 
International Club 




International Club 

FRONT Row: Heather Rothschild, 
Kerry Manning, Andrea Chechile, 
Alexis Heede. Second Row: Mara 
Gaudette, Tara Reavey, Courtney 
Ware, Rachel Morton, Amber Quist, 
Diama Cerasa, Ryan Scott. Third 
Row: Cynthia Brescia, Becky 
Beacom, Nanhee McMinn, Tara Daly, 
Kara Welch, Dean Rosenthal. Back 
Row: Kim Ingram, Kathy Bresette, 
Shauna Sutton, Kristen Cavros, 
Megan Nicoli, Diana Dolan and Julie 
Wong. 

Drama Club 

FRONT Row: Elizabeth Tencza, 
Michael Jackson, Katie Lewis, Diama 
Cerasa, Jennifer Shaw, Linda Wall- 
ing, Sara Valentine. Second Row: 
Brigitte Pelouze, Lisa Lewis, Christine 
Sarno, Wendy Deshais, Teri 
Tousignant, Heather Brown, Julie 
Wong, Cathy Sargent. Third Row: 
Pam Zajac, Rob Fortier, Bethany 
Sager, Diana Dolan, Jody Michalski, 
Vanessa Fernandez. Back Row: Eliza- 
beth Young, Michelle Laferriere, 
Cathy Gagnon, Ryan Scott, and 
Lauren Raffa. 

Hosts and Hostesses 

FRONT Row: Ryan Scott, Melissa 
Laraway, Christine Logan, Maria 
Sartori, Judy Maleckas. Second Row: 
Jennifer Herbert, Diana Dolan, Jody 
Michalski, Jennifer Mackie. Back 
Row: Amy Currier, Kelli Walbridge. 

PAVAS 

FRONT Row: Adviser Mr. Richard 
Spencer, Tara Daly, Erica Dutil, 
Jennifer Lucarelle, Keely Fitzgerald, 
Vail Mosier. Second Row: Diama 
Cerasa, Rachel Morton, Lisa Lewis, 
Amity Simons, Melissa Laraway, 
Lauren Troy. Back Row: Andrew 
Clines, Misty Foss, Heather 
Rothschild, Mary Veideman, Kristen 
Falzone, Kelli Walbridge, and 
Vanessa Fernandez. 




^ \ ■ ■'" 



6 ^ M C 

y ' J ' f\ §1 ?% ^k 1* 









: 



40 DRAMA CLUB/PAV AS/HOSTS AND HOSTESSES/INTERNATIONAL CLUB 



- 




What club helps to 
sell tickets, dis- 
tribute programs, 
helps with refreshments, and 
act as school guides? HOST 
AND HOSTESSES club. 
These helpful students can 
be seen throughout the year 
helping out at such functions 
as the pops concert, the 
drama productions, Gradua- 
tion, Eighth grade orienta- 
tion, Syncho Show, concerts, 
open house, N.H.S. induc- 
tion, and the freshman first 
day of school. 

What club helps bring a 
cultural experience to the 
students at our school? 
DRAMA CLUB. This year, 
drama club's production is 
called "A Funny Thing Hap- 
pened on the Way to the 



Forum." Director Mark 
Sikes leads this talented cast, 
consisting of Chris 
Tarantino as Hero, Matt 
Nelson as Pseudolous, and 
Brigitte Pelouze as Domina, 
who are supported by Roger 
Brunelle, Nathan Root, Joao 
Fernandez, Heather Brown, 
Colleen Fitzgerald, Hillary 
Brown, Rob Fortier, and Sa- 
rah McGahan. This cast also 
consists of Proteans: Eliza- 
beth Tencza, Bethany Sager, 
Renee Gibson and Laura 
Raffa. The Courtesans are 
played by: Bonnie Hanson, 
Amy Kraus, Kelly Gilligan, 
Meghan Freed, Julie Wong, 
Linda Walling, and Cathy 
Gagnon. The soldiers are 
Ryan Scott, Tom Walling 
and Benjamin Muldrew. 



What club has helped send 
the Troops in Saudi Arabia a 
very large care package? IN- 
TERNATIONAL CLUB. 
This club participated in 
"Operation History Class" 
in conjunction with Ms. 
Brewer's history classes. 
This project was a relief ef- 
fort for those men and 
women over in the Persian 
Gulf, headed by officers: 
Andrea Chechile, David 
Kozub, Kerry Manning, and 
Megan Nicoli. 

These are only a few high- 
lighted clubs at Minnechaug. 
There are many other that 
we have not touched on. 
However, they need to be 
remembered and thought 
about when it comes to de- 
ciding what clubs to join. 



INTENTLY, Elizabeth Tencza 
watches Chris Tarantino as he prac- 
tices for the drama club's production 
of "A Funny Thing Happened on the 
Way to the Forum." Chris played 
Hero and Elizabeth portrays a pro- 
tean. 

CHEERFULLY, Kate McAleer 
helps out at the PAVAS bake sale. 
Helping to support the arts is an 
important part of PAVAS's plan. The 
money they earned went towards a 
charitable cause. 




HELPING WITH Operation 
History Cares, an activity to cheer up 
men and women fighting in the Per- 
sian Gulf, is Brian Borsari. This pro- 
ject took a lot of work, but was suc- 
cessful, thanks to the dedication of 
the International Club Members. 




— — 



HOST AND HOSTESSES, PAVAS, INTERNATIONAL CLUB 41 




WORKING TOGETHER 



In the past couple of 
years, the Smoke Signal 
has shown definite signs 
of growth and improvement. 
The publication slinked to a 
one page edition, but has 
grown rapidly since then. It 
is currently eight pages 
packed with the latest in 
school events, fashion devel- 
opments, student opinions, 
and sports. It also features a 
"Back Page," where any- 
thing goes. 

The faculty adviser of the 
newspaper is Mr. Greg 
Trimmer. He has been active 
with the newspaper since the 
seventies, and has accumu- 
lated much experience on the 
subject of high school news- 
papers. He is still troubled by 
this question: "What is the 



function of a high school 
newspaper?" His ideas clash 
with those of the editors once 
in a while, but that's what 
makes a good paper. 

The editors of the paper 
are Kathy Bresette, Becky 
Beacom, Shauna Sutton, 
Dean Rosenthal, Amy Liese, 
Ryan Trombly, Melissa 
Morse, and Brooke Sperry. 
The hardest job they have is 
getting people to write arti- 
cles for them, which is a lot 
harder than it sounds. 

The paper also has several 
noteworthy writers, such as 
Antonio Quisman, the Won- 
der Twins, Keely Fitzgerald, 
Tom Walling, Chris Lynch, 
Bob O'Neil, and Jen 
Lucarelle. 




COPE. Jen Ferrandino, Joe Wil- 
son, Bill Viedemen, Francis Truitt, 
Joia Davis, and Jen Breton. 



HELPING Jennifer Harrington are 
Pam Chase, Jennifer Ferrandino, Eric 
Degray, Lisa Anderson. 



PUTTING TOGETHER ideas 

for Emeralds are Tom Walling, 
Michelle Zhe, Heather Brown, and 
Erica Dutil. Miss Latino is the advisor 
for this literary magazine. Emeralds is 
published once a year at Minnechaug. 
Emeralds held a raffle to raise money 
to publish the magazine. 




42 SMOKE SIGNAL, EMERALDS, PEER MEDIATION, AND COUNSELING 




EMERALDS. Front row: Julie Wong, Erica Dutil, Heather Brown. 
Back row: Mary Plowe, Tom Walling, Sara Marvaso, Michelle Zhe. 





W~ "—J 








jS^ 










i 






Br ■ m 


i i 


% 


w. . ~ ■ 






ir* 


^ 


A,,, ll 



PEER COUNSELORS. Front Row: Anne Marie Zanfagna, 
Kay-Kay Sutton, Pamela Zajac. Back Row: Becky Takorian, Lori 
Richter, Carl Streeter, and Stacy Jacobs. 




SMOKE SIGNAL. Front 
Row: Ryan Trombly, Dean 
Rosenthal. Second Row: Amy 
Liese, Becky Beacom, Kathy 
Bresette, Shauna Sutton, Alexis 
Heede. Third Row: Michael Jack- 



son, Clarence Martin, Sara Valen- 
tine, Christine Vecchio, Linda 
Walling, Cynthia Allard. Back 
Row: Brooke Sperry, Nicole 
LaPierre, Katie Lewis, Tom Wall- 
ing, Jennifer Lucarelle. 



1 


f\jm- Jb_-^__ 


A©i 


liLf 


/V 


.-Ay 




-,>__fl 


_i__t_u 




1 ~ j_r -♦•■■ ■ W-"i 
i mm '''<? M_ 


■t '" r i 






ET V ' — §1 



PEER MEDIATION. Andy 

Henshon, Julie Wong, Rob 
Thorpe, Mandy Kober, Becky 
Takorian, Tom Gagnon, Heath 
Bleau, lisa Anderson. Russ 



Mooney, Stacy Jacobs, Pam 
Zajac, Kay-Kay Sutton, Lori Rich- 
ter, Juliet Greene, Alexis Heede, 
Jen Breton, AnneMarie Zanfagna. 




I hate deadlines!! Plain 
and simple." 

-Jen Lucarelle, 
Smoke Signal 




I like journalism. I also 
think we need a school 
newspaper. Without volun- 
teers, we wouldn't have 
one." 

-Shauna Sutton, 
Smoke Signal 




IT S a good experience. 
I hope the program will ex- 
pand after 1 leave. I'll be 
back to make sure." 

-Kay-Kay Sutton, 
Peer Counselor 




________ 




A GOOD newspaper reporter 
must spend some time in the halls 
talking to people. Meghan Freed, au- 
thor of Back Page Poll, interviewed 
many freshmen for her December 
article. 



SMOKE SIGNAL, EMERALDS. PEER MEDIATION AND 

COUNSELING 43 




I like the people. I like 
meeting with the kids from 
the other schools." 

-Bill Dean, 
Chess Club 




I feel FBLA will give me 
experience in different as- 
pects of the business 
world. I enjoy FBLA be- 
cause there are a lot of nice 
people involved in it." 

-Jessie Arabik, 
FBLA 




I want to help chapter 
members to promote busi- 
ness leadership skills and 
develop character." 

-Becky Takorian, 
FBLA 




CHESS CLUB 

ANDY Clines, Tom Walling, Mr. 
Francis Sersanti, Nathan Howells, 
and Bill O'Connell. 



PHOTO CLUB 

MR. Thomas Orzulak, advisor, Ul 
Mascaro, Amanda Howells, Wendy 
Poole, and John Davenport. 



FBLA Officers 

HEATHER Bleau, Secretary; Ed 
D'Amato, Treasurer; Becky 
Takorian, President; Norma Dinoia, 
Vice President. 

FUTURE BUSINESS 

LEADERS OF 

AMERICA 

FRONT Row: Tom Gagnon, Ed 
D'Amato, Norma Dinoia, Becky 
Takorian, Heather Bleau. Back Row: 
Adviser Joan Guziec, Scott Giles, 
Nikki Pepin, Rob Pridemore, Jim 
Anderson, Stephanie Burke, and 
Diane Jeserski, adviser. 




44 FBLA, PHOTO CLUB, CHESS CLUB 






HE WHO SEEKS FINDS REWARDS IN DEDICATION 



The Future Business 
Leaders of America 
(FBLA) is new to our 
school, but not to other 
schools around the world. 
Students traveled to Auburn 
in September where they 
participated in the induction 
rf Minnechaug as a chapter. 
The new organization is 
ed by President Becky 
Takorian and Vice President 
^Jorma Dinoia. According to 
3ecky, its members are 
'dedicated students, willing 



to succeed." She adds, 
"These motivated members 
have accomplished many of 
our set goals." 

A bottle drive was held in 
the fall to raise funds. In 
December, the members or- 
ganized the sending of over 
500 Christmas cards to 
American servicemen in the 
Persian Gulf. The sale of 
candy cane pens and candy 
bars strengthened the associ- 
ation's treasury. 

In the spring students will 



participate in competitions 
in the academic areas of Ac- 
counting, Business Law, Of- 
fice Procedures, Entrepre- 
neurship, Economics, Short- 
hand, Typing, Business 
Math, and Impromptu 
Speaking. 

The activities of the asso- 
ciation are designed to en- 
courage intelligent career 
choices, develop business 
skills, teach the value of 
community responsibility, 
and to strengthen self-confi- 



dence. 

President Becky Takorian 
affirms the value of belong- 
ing to FBLA. "Through my 
involvement in FBLA, I've 
come to realize the opportu- 
nities that lie ahead in the 
world of business." 



LEARNING to manage money and 
make decisions was on the agenda at the 
Eastern States Regional FBLA Conference 
in Baltimore, MD in November. Represent- 
ing Minnechaug were Mrs. Diane Jeserski, 
Rob Pridemore, Becky Takorian, Jim 
Anderson and Mrs. Joan Guziec. 




FUTURE BUSINESS LEADERS OF AMERICA 45 



IN THE PRESENT TENSE 



The Junior Classical 
League has much to 
be proud of. At the 
JCL State Convention, two 
of our peers were chosen as 
state officers. Rachel 
Morton, senior, is the State 
Publications Editor. Her du- 
ties include publishing a JCL 
newspaper for state-wide dis- 
tribution. 

Senior Monica Maltby 
was elected as President of 
the State Junior Classical 
League. She presides over 
the meetings and takes on 
the responsibility of hosting 
the State Convention which 
will be held here on May 1 1 . 

The annual Catapult Con- 
test was held here on No- 
vember 17, 1990. Our be- 
loved Chloris won its divi- 
sion for accuracy and dis- 
tance. In addition, the crowd 
witnessed Pittsfield break 
the national balista record 
with a shot that went from 
the back of the school into 
the woods. 

The club held many fund 



raisers to help pay for the 
state convention. These in- 
cluded the Battle of the Clas- 
ses Dance, the Homecoming 
Dance, and a T-Shirt Two- 
For sale. 

In March the faculty and 
students competed in a vol- 
leyball game, the proceeds of 
which are used to raise 
money for the students of the 
Lower Pioneer Valley Edu- 
cational Collaborative. Sen- 
ior Citizens' Day was also 
another project organized by 
JCL. The senior citizens en- 
joyed attending the classes 
and eating lunch with the 
faculty and students. 

Local President Jamie 
Clark, Vice President Tara 
Reavey, Secretary Laura 
Gravelin, and Treasurer Pe- 
ter Dowd with the member- 
ship, and adviser Mrs. 
Marilyn Ats, certainly have 
displayed by their actions 
that the Junior Classical 
League certainly functions 
with their feet in the present, 
not the past. 





ENTHUSIASTICALLY try- 

ing to pull the arm down on Chloris in 
preparation to shoot are Mark Kulis, 
Adam Winseck, Dave Sylvia, Mark 
Tromblay, John Albano, and Eric 
Sagalyn. Team cooperation is vital to 
producing the best results in catapult 
contests. 

ROYALTY does have its re- 
wards. President, Jamie Clark, is 
supported by JCL members, Rachel 
Morton, Kim Forrant, Denise Allard, 
Marie Courtney, Laura Gravelin, Tara 
Reavey, and Monica Maltby. 



JUNIOR CLASSICAL! 

LEAGUE. Front Row: Peter 
Rodgers, Jamie Clark, Monica 
Maltby, Rachel Morton, Tara Reavey, 
Laura Gravelin, Kimberly Forrant. 
Second Row: Greg Mascaro, Betsy 
Leritz, Elizabeth Tencza, Amber 
Quist, Sue Pierce, Diama Cerasa, 
Kara Welch, Cynthia Brescia, Carrie 
Boudreau. Third Row: Vanessa 
Fernandez, Amy Smith, Elizabeth 
Leahey, Amy Spear, Nicole LaPierre, 
Kara Perkins, Kimberly Wyzkik, Kimr 
Ingram, Nicole Boissonnault, 
Jennifer Grono. Fourth Row: Nathan- 
Howells, Shawn Taylor, Scott Smith. 
Mike Roberts, Kevin Gottehrer, Mi- 
chael Ketschek, Kevin Maltby, 
Melissa Morse, Christine Samo, Amyi 
Hitchcock, Allison Moore. Back Row:* 
Adam Winseck, Dave Sylvian 
Christopher Kerbel, Matthew 
Laraway, Mark Tromblay, 
Christopher Mosellen, Jennifer 
Kotomski, Brian Fitzgerald, Bridget 
Baron. 



3 



46 JUNIOR CLASSICAL LEAGUE 








"WHERE'S Monica, 
Cara Mia?" 

-Mascot, JCL 




"**-!*, I forgot to do my 
Latin!" 

-Laura Gravelin, JCL 




HOW do you work this 
thing?" 

-Tara Reavey, JCL 

Announcer of Catapult 

Contest 




JUNIOR CLASSICAL LEAGUE 47 




"It's more than just sit- 
ting around doing sci- 
ence problems. We have 
lots of fun, both in and 
out of the competitions. 
■Peter Rodgers. 
Science Olympiad 




"It's great! They give us 
good food during the 
meetings and even nerds 
make good company. " 
-Mary Wallace. 
Mathletes 




"When we were taping 
the show, we saw Bren- 
da Garten and Dave 
Madsen. For the first 
time, I realized how 
short they actually are. " 
■Andrew Henshon, 
As Schools Match Wits 



Science Olympiad 

FRONT row: Andrew Clines, 
Alex Durzy, Cynthia Brescia, 
Mara Gaudette, Griff Noble, Otis 
Thomas. Second Row: Jeffrey 
Moore, Seth Hedlun, Christopher 
Hebert, Jennifer Grono, Kara Per- 
kins, Dean Rosenthal. Third Row: 
Peter Rodgers, Cathy Duffy, Ma- 
ria Sartori, Amity Simons, 
Shauna Sutton, Nicole Bluteau, 
Jody Michaelski, Rebecca Gibb. 
Back Row: Mrs. Vickers, Caetano 
Rodamilans, Andrew Forcier, 
Brad Burnette, Rylan Grant, 
Kathy Bresette, Rebecca Beacom, 
Ryan Trombly. 





Mr. Don Bamford, Andrew 
Clines, Jeffrey Moore, Mary Wal- 
lace, Leah Soule, Nathan Howells, 
Alex Durzy, Mrs. Barton, Mrs. 
Barbara Sirois. 

As Schools Match 
Wits 

Front Row: Melissa Luttrell, 
Amity Simons. Back Row: Brian 
Borsari, Andrew Henshon, An- 
drew Forcier. 




48 SCIENCE OLYMPIAD/MATHLETES 






ONE FOR THE GIPPER 



Mr. Ray Mussel- 
man's hard work fi- 
nally paid off. 
Vfter four years of bad luck 
nd tough breaks, the As 
Ichools Match Wits team 
/on a match against Mt. 
tverett Regional. Mr. Mus- 
elman has watched some of 
le brightest students go 
own in undeserved defeat, 
ut this year, the team came 
ut ready to get their coach 
ie win he deserved. 
The students who com- 



peted were Melissa Lutrell, 
the resident sage on poetry, 
classical music, and the 
Presidents; Ryan Trombly, 
a pro with books and their 
authors, and also a sports 
expert; Drew Forcier, a his- 
tory buff; and Brian Borsari, 
a "jack of all trades" whose 
quirky knowledge helped fill 
in the gaps. Andrew Hen- 
shon was the alternate, al- 
ways willing and eager to 
lend a hand. There was 
great team spirit between 



these trivia buffs, and they 
all had one purpose: to bring 
home a victory for their 
coach. 

When the close match 
against Mt. Everett Region- 
al ended, Mr. Musselman 
walked slowly over to the 
Minnechaug booth and 
shook each of the team 
member's hands. He didn't 
say much, but the team 
could see the pride in his 
eyes. After many years, he 
was actually able to return 



the next night to tape an- 
other show. Although the 
team lost a tough match to 
Hampshire Regional, 110- 
130, they had the satisfac- 
tion of knowing that they 
had won one for their coach. 
It may not have been a 
championship, but it was 
good enough. 

BEFORE THE MATCH Drew 
Forcier, Brian Borsari, Melissa Lu- 
trell, Ryan Trombly, Andrew Hen- 
shon, Mr. Musselman, and host 
Phil Shepherdson pose for a pic- 
ture. 




■ 



AS SCHOOLS MATCH WITS 49 




"/ think it's really great 
that Roger and Brian are 
Co-Presidents. It shows 
that two people can 
work together without 
fighting in such an im- 
portant position. " 

■Rob Fortier, NHS 




"They're a good bunch 
of kids to work with. 
They are all high- 
achievers and the Phone- 
A-Thon is always a 
blast." 

Brian Borsari, NHS 






-MfcSfc. 


J 


r Tf 


I 




\ 


* - 



"Everybody else in NHS 

is almost as smart as 

me. That's why it's fun." 

-Rylan Grant. NHS 





50 NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 



national Honor 
Society 

rRONT Row: Tania Fernandez, 
. .mber Quist, Sarah Hsaio, Rylan 
brant. Vail Mosier, Erica Dutil, 
phristopher Hebert. Second Row: 
Monica Maltby, Catherine Gag- 
hon, Steve Belden, Alexis Heede, 
Matthew Glover, Seth Hudland, 
pric Boduch, Alex Durzy. Third 
ow: Bethany Sager, Betsy Leritz, 
eather Brown, Mary Wallace, Pa- 
ela Zajac, Sara Taylor, James 
ubord. Fourth Row: Rebecca 
eacom, Kathy Bresette, Mara 
Gaudette, Terence Tousignant 
JDenise Allard, Nancy Bigos, Rob 
Lrt Fortier, Brad Burnette. Back 
Row: Brian Borsari, Matthew Nel 
son, Sean Campbell, Kim Ingram 
Clay Holdsworth, Amanda 
Howells, Leah Soule, Kathy Col 
lier. 






PATIENTLY AWAITING their 
induction into National Honor So- 
ciety Mary Veideman and Jen 
Shaw enjoy a quiet conversation. 
Both girls are seniors and have 
worked hard, especially this past 
year, to get into the NHS. 

AT AN EARLY morning meet- 
ing, Betsy Leritz, Sara Taylor, and 
Mrs. MaryLou Sitnik make a val- 
iant attempt to organize the 1990 
Induction Ceremony. Thanks to 
hard work and organization, the 
ceremony was a tremendous suc- 
cess. 



HONORABLE LABORS 



It is an honor and a privi- 
lege to be a member of 
the National Honor So- 
ciety. Its members have 
shown that they are both ca- 
pable of involving them- 
selves in extracurricular ac- 
tivities as well as maintain- 
ing a high grade point aver- 
age. Once these students are 
inducted into NHS, they do 
not sit idle. Under the solid 
guidance of their advisor, 
Mrs. Mary Lou Sitnik, they 
involve themselves in a 
number of interesting, chal- 
lenging, and helpful activi- 
ties. 

Last March, Minnechaug 
set a record for all schools 
during the annual American 
Heart Association phone-a- 
thon, raising over five thou- 
sand dollars. A successful 
three week food drive 
helped support the Tri 
County Survival Center this 
fall. Students in each home- 
room brought in food and 
supplies for three Fridays. 
NHS recognized represen- 
tatives from the homerooms 



at the induction ceremony. 

In addition to these func- 
tions performed for the 
community, NHS also helps 
the students of Minnechaug 
as well. For example, its 
members put their knowl- 
edge to good use by tutoring 
other students, a practice 
which has been very useful 
over the years. Also, each 
year NHS gives out scholar- 
ships to some of its mem- 
bers. The recipients must 
exhibit exceptional leader- 
ship and academic qualities. 
The Hawaiian Dance, 
Peach Festival Booth, and 
the spring raffle provide the 
money for this practice. 
Last year, one $500 scholar- 
ship and two $250 scholar- 
ships were given. 

The National Honor So- 
ciety is far from being an 
inactive organization. They 
work hard to help the school 
and community, and in the 
meantime sharpen up the 
leadership skills that will aid 
them for the rest of their 
lives. 




NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 51 




In the varsity soccer 
season finale, Mike 
Spillane dribbles the 
ball toward Northampton's 



goal. Despite scores from Ja- 
son Robinson and Chris Berte, 
the Falcons lost their last 
game of the season, 3-2. 



52 SPORTS D. DER 







CAUGHT IN THE MOMENT 



fter a season of waiting for glory 
Athletes became legends in this story- 
Long, gruelling were often fought 
With each special moment being caught. 

*-*i uccess wasn't measured in fortune or fame 
*"^ But rather in the way they played the game 
Tireless effort and practice every day 
Sometimes the ball just didn't bounce their way. 





r-w-f he fans were behind them from day one 
A It made no difference how many games they won 
The fans' strong support never died 
Because of one thing: Minnechaug pride. 



SPORTS DIVIDER 53 



RACING to the net with ag- 
gression, Ten Tousignant returns 
his opponent's volley. Ten, a ju- 
nior, competed in his first season 
as a member of the boys' tennis 
team in 1990. 





A MEMBER of the first doubles 
team, Michelle Leung prepares to 
send the ball across the net. 
Michelle's doubles partner was 
Cathy Gagnon. 



Both teams were always 

LOOKING TOWAED THE SKY 



Again the girls' tennis 
team had another ter- 
rific season, tying with 
Agawam and East Long- 
meadow to win the Western 
Massachusetts division B title. 

The singles scene was led by 
co-captains Mary LaPierre and 
Diana Pabich, both of whom 
are veteran players. Playing 
first singles, Mary was 
undefeated throughout the sea- 
son and Diana held a strong 
second singles position. 

Sara Jenkins was the main 
third singles player. Kerry 
Manning, Cathy Gagnon, and 
Cynthia Brescia also had some 
third singles action. 

Michelle Leung and Cathy 




m 






u i 



DEFYING gravity, Matthew Nelson 
sends a blistering forehand return to his 
opponent. Matt played mostly second 
singles for the Minnechaug boys' team 
during the spring 1990 season. 



Gagnon played first doubles, 
while second alternated among 
Kerry Manning, Lori Estrada, 
Cynthia Brescia, Julie Nieder- 
fringer, and Linda Walling. 

At the head of boys' tennis 
were Tony Rys, Tim Sullivan, 
Matt Nelson, Brendan Hallo- 
ran, Alex Durzy, Dean Rosen- 
thal, and Kevin Goettherer. 
Brendan Halloran played first 
singles, while second singles 
was led by Matt Nelson. Kevin 
Goettherer competed in third 
singles. 

Tony Rys and Alex Durzy 
represented the team in first 
doubles, and Tim Sullivan and 
Dean Rosenthal played second 
doubles. 



Girls' Tennis 




Girls' Tennis 




Westfield 4-1 


4-1 


Agawam 3-2 


2-3 


Chicopee 5-0 


5-0 


Ludlow 5-0 


4-1 


ELongmeadow 2-3 


3-2 


Palmer 5-0 


5-0 


Holyoke 5-0 


3-2 


Final Record: 12-2 





Boys' Tennis 



Westfield 1-4 


0-5 


Ludlow 0-5 


2-3 


Agawam 1-4 


3-2 


ELongmeadow 2-3 


2-3 


Holyoke 0-5 


0-5 


Final Record: 1-9 







I 



54 BOYS' AND GIRLS' TENNIS 






IT'S A BIRD, it's a plane — no! It's a 
tennis ball, flying through the air at the 
speed of light! Tim Sullivan, holding his 
trusty racket, anxiously prepares himself 
to return the lob and hopefully, win the 
game. 




WITH A LOOK of determination of her 
face, Diana Pabich jumps in the air and 
aggressively attacks the ball, at the same 
time, attacking her opponent. Diana 
played second singles for the 1 990 sea- 
son. 

GIRLS' TENNIS TEAM. Front Row: 
Julie Niederfringer, Mary LaPierre, Diana 
Pabich. Second Row: Cathy Gagnon, 
Sara Jenkins, Michelle Leung, Lori 
Estrada. Back Row: Coach Gladys 
Grande, Linda Walling, Cynthia Brescia, 
Kerry Manning. 




BOYS' TENNIS TEAM. Front Row: Jennings, Dean Rosenthal, Brendan 

Matt Nelson, Tim Sullivan, Tony Rys, Halloran, Tony Desjardins, Griff Noble, 

Mike Sargent, Ten Tousignant. Second Al Durzy, Eric Brunelle, Kevin Goettherer, 

Row: Coach Tom Emery, Angus Steve Jack. 



BOYS' AND GIRLS' TENNIS 55 



DURING a syncho show re- 
hearsal, Amber Quist dances to 
"Batdance". 





Synchronized 
Swimmers 

SHOW 
THEIR 
STUFF 

Last year, the syn- 
chronized swim 
team had a suc- 
cessful and exciting show. 
The theme was "movies." 
The routines ranged from 
the slow song "Wind Be- 
neath My Wings" to the 
fast upbeat theme song to 
"Batman" in which Am- 
ber Quist played the joker 
along with her entourage. 
Seven seniors left the 
team after dedication and 
much effort put into the 
show. Seniors Nicole 
Brady, Molly Rihm, Ei- 
leen Blomberg, Lori Gil, 
Beth Gillen, Katie Racz- 
ka, and Tara Wholley 
were among those who 
choreographed the deck 
and water work. 

The show was per- 
formed for a good size 
audience who appreciated 
the swimmers and their 
technique. In fact, one 
gentleman appreciated the 
show so much that he 
joined the swimmers. He 
was quickly removed and 
the team was able to con- 
tinue without missing a 
beat. 







SYNCHRONIZED swimming. 

Front Row: Tara Wholley, Lori Gil, Molly 
Rihm, Beth Gillen, Nicole Brady. Second 
Row: Kara Ruscio, Amy Kraus, Tara 
Reavey, Jen Lucarelle, Amber Quist, 
Becky Beacom. Third Row: Karen 
McCarthy, Kristen Cavros, Sandy 



Donnelly, Ali Loper, Lynn Gil, Jodi Shep- 
ard, Kriste Zimmerman. Back Row: 
Collette Couture, Melissa Morse, Erin 
Gillen, Angela Brunelle, Christine Logan, 
Maria Sartori, Anna Tarantino, Carrie 
Hapgood, Wendy Burke. 



Their 8-5 record was proof that they could 

HANDLE THE ROUGH SPOTS 



The varsity golf team had 
a winning season this 
year, and were quite a 
feisty bunch. Although their 
play sometimes resembled 
"Caddyshack", coach Dave 
Barry "The Man," did a fine 
job of mending them into "re- 
sponsible, respectable golfers." 
They finished in the top five at 
the Western Massachusetts 
Team Championships, quite an 
achievement. At the # 1 posi- 
tion was Pat Galleher "Holly- 
wood," a fine golfer who also 
won the Wester Massachusetts 
Individual crown. The #2 man 
was Brian Bishop "The Ham- 
mer," who lived up to all expec- 
tations and always kept his cool 
out on the links. Sliding in at 
#3 was Scott Hapgood 
"Quickhands," whose uncanny 
ability to come through with 
crucial points helped the team 
immensely during the season. 
Brian Borsari "The Intimida- 
tor," settled nicely into the #4 
position, making some norm- 



ally collected players lose their 
cool (and the match). Steve 
Belden "The Machine," 
hummed away the #5 position, 
hitting his Executive 3-iron 
with deadly precision. Three 
players, Roger Brunelle "The 
Cat," Jon Albano "The 
Crusher," and Scott McFar- 
land "Big Foot" fought it out 
weekly for the #6 position. 

Junior Varsity Golf, coached 
by Mr. John Courtney, also had 
a good year. The team consisted 
of: T.J. Courtney "The Hawk", 
Andrew Henshon "The Tiger", 
Paul Kozub "The Spider", 
Chris Lucarelle "The Tiger", 
Greg Mascaro "The Owl", and 
Ben Muldrew "The Mauler." 
The J.V. team not only im- 
proved their golf game over the 
season, but also earned them- 
selves nicknames that they 
could be proud of. Because of 
the youth on the team (the team 
was made up entirely of under- 
classmen), they will continue to 
be a force in years to come. 






■ 



56 GOLF/SYNUiO 






Varsity Golf 




Longmeadow 

Ludlow 

WSpringfield 

South Hadley 

Agawam 

ELongmeadow 

Westfield 



4.5-13.5 

13.0-5 

14.0-4 

10.0-8 

7.5-10.5 

13.5-4.5 

3.5-14.5 



7.0-11 

9.5-8.5 

11.5-6.5 

14.0-4 

15.0-3 

9.0-9 



Final Record: 8-5 



JVGolf 




Cathedral 


0.5-17.5 


Westfield 


7.0-17 


WSpringfield 


17.0-1 


ELongmeadow 


13.0-5 


WSpringfield 


13.0-5 


Cathedral 


2.0-12 


Westfield 


5.0-13 


Agawam 


8.0-10 


ELongmeadow 


11.0-7 


Final Record: 


4-5 




VARSITY GOLF. Front row: Scott Barry, Steve Belden, Brian Borsari, Scott 
McFarland, Paul Kozub, Roger Brunelle, Hapgood, Brian Bishop, Pat Galleher. 
Jon Albano. Back row: Coach Dave 




JV GOLF. Front row: Ben Muldrew, 
Andrew Henshon. Back row: Coach 



BRIAN BORSARI attempts to get 
himself out of a precarious situation. 



John Courtney, T.J. Courtney, Greg 
Mascaro, Chris Lucarelle. 



GOLF/SYNCHO 57 



V. LACROSSE. Front: Larry Shay, 
Chad Brown, Bryce Whiting, Frank 
Flynn. Middle: Jason Robinson, Matt 
Glover, Dave Gibb, Steve Meisner, Kevin 
Hughes. Back: Coach Russ Mooney, Jim 
Troy, Jon Kerbel, Todd Shumate, Bill 
Veideman. 



ELCIDING a Northampton opponent 
in the junior varsity game is Michael 
McCurry (25). Minnechaug prevailed by a 
narrow margin of 5 to 4, sweeping the 
two games against Northampton. They 
ended the season with a 6-8 record. 




JV LACROSSE. Front row: Scott 
Sartwell, Jeremy Winn, Ted Furst, Doug 
Parke, Marcel Verdon, Dave Labadorf, 
Chris MacFarlane. Second row: Pete 
Rodgers, Sean Foley, Jay Gagliarducci, 
Michael McCurry, Mike Spillane, Doug 
Rose, Eric Hall. Back row: Joe Wilson, 
Bill Fridlington, Jeff Young, Derek 

Giordano, Eric Sagalyn, Ed Miner, Coach 
Marc Spinowitz. 



PLANNING HIS STRATEGY, Jason 
Robinson prepares to join the action in 
the game at Northampton. Minnechaug 
won by a score of 1 9 to 7. They also won 
the first game against Northampton, 1 0- 
9. 





A trip to the playoffs was cause for 

CELEBRATION 



This very successful sea- 
son, in which the Fal- 
cons scored their first 
playoff berth, was led by cap- 
tains Chad Meisner, Bryce 
Whiting, and Chad Brown. A 
highlight of the season was a 
near-victory over perennial 
state champion Longmeadow. 
The Falcons held strong 
through two overtime periods 
before finally bowing, 10-9. 

The talent level of this team 
was so great that several mem- 
bers were invited to compete in 



the Bay State Games. Chadd 
Brown, an all- Western Massa-i 
chusetts defenseman, Kevinn 
Hughes, Steve Meisner, andi; 
John Farrell represented' 
Minnechaug in this event. 

Midfielder Bryce Whiting 
and attacker Chad Meisner led 
the team in scoring, while 
defenseman Chad Brown and 
goalie Steve Meisner bolstered 
the defense. Although they lost 
their first playoff game, they 
showed much skill and power 
in getting there. 



V Lacrosse 



South Hadley 


9-4 


13-5 


Longmeadow 


9-10 


8-21 


Amherst 


23-3 


13-12 


Northampton 


10-9 


19-7 


Westfield 


8-10 


6-9 


Wilb. Monson 


11-8 




South Windsor 


19-10 




Final Record: 8-4 





JV Lacrosse 



WSpringfield 


2-9 2-4 


South Hadley 


10-8 12-5 


Longmeadow 


2-17 2-9 


Amherst 


0-3 2-5 


Northampton 


5-3 5-4 


Westfield 


2-9 4-8 


Wilb. Monson 


win by forfeit 


South Windsor 


4-3 


Final Record: 6-8 



58 V/JV LACRC 





PURSUED by a Northampton oppo- 
nent in the junior varsity game, junior 
Doug Rose circles the net like a hawk 
and prepares to shoot. 



CRADLING the ball, junior Jim Troy 
blows by his opponent in the varsity 
game. Jim played the midfielder po- 
sition for the Minnechaug varsity 
squad. 



MIDFIELDER Bryce Whiting, one of 
the best lacrosse players in Western 
Massachusetts, celebrates after scor- 
ing another goal. Bryce scored over 
30 goals on his way to an All-Western 
Massachusetts season. 



V/JV LACROSSE 59 



RANGING to his right, two- 
time all-league third baseman Mi- 
chael Ligarski (11) snags a high 
hop in a game at Minnechaug 
against Central High. Minnechaug 
won the game, 10-5. 




VARSITY BASEBALL. Front row: 
Jack Welch, Chris Kuselias, Mike 
Ligarski, Mark Haggerty. Second row: 
Noel Smith, Andy Hersman, Ken Kilduff, 
Jaime Connell, Jim Cowee, Oliver 



Asmar, Jason Carr. Back row: Coach 
Mike Ligarski, Jim Dubord, Bob O'Neil, 
Roy Legere, Eric White, Bryan 
Christofori, Neil Nordstrom. 




SECOND BASEMAN Bryan 
Christofori covers the base and 
receives the warmup throw from 
catcher Neil Nordstrom. 



With veterans and newcomers, varsity baseball 

HURLED SIX VICTORIES 




If the varsity baseball team 
had played every game at 
home, they would have 
been invincible. They had all 
six of their wins at Minnechaug 
for a 6-3 record at home. How- 
ever, the road woes got to them 
as they lost all nine of their 
away games. One early season 
highlight was a 6-5 victory over 
Cathedral, a highly-touted 
team in the preseason. 

The team was led by second 
time all-League third baseman 
Mike Ligarski and pitcher 
Chris Kuselias. Other senior 
contributors were Oliver 
Asmar, who came over from 
the track team and performed 
very well, Mark Haggerty, Jack 
Welch, Noel Smith, Andy 



Hersman, Ken Kilduff, Jamie 
Connell, and Jim Cowee. Jason 
Carr was the only junior mem- 
ber of the team. Several sopho- 
more newcomers, Jim Dubord, 
Bob O'Neil, Eric White, Bryan 
Christofori, and Neil 
Nordstrom, also made up the 
team. Freshman Roy Legere 
got valuable pitching experi- 
ence on the varsity. 

The team received consistent 
pitching and defense, but a lack 
of offensive power sometimes 
hurt them. In eight of their 
twelve defeats, they scored 
three runs or less. But with a 
young squad to work with, 
Coach Ligarski has a bright 
future before him. 







60 VARSITY BASEBALL 




VETERAN SENIOR PITCHER Chris 
Kuselias hurls the Falcons to victory in 
the Central game. Chris got the winning 
decision in the 10-5 victory, one of the 
Falcons' six wins over the course of the 
season. 



NEIL NORDSTROM attempts to 
block a Central opponent from scoring as 
the umpire stands ready to make the call. 
Neil told us later that he was saying, 
"Please don't run into me!" to himself 
during this play. 




Varsity Baseball 



Holyoke 


3-2 




Northampton 


0-4 




South Hadley 


0-3 




Cathedral 


6-5 




ELongmeadow 


3-7 




Chicopee Comp 


3-7 




Ludlow 


6-4 




Agawam 


0-11 




Central 


10-5 




Chicopee 


5-11 




Westfield 


1-11 


1-6 


Amherst 


4-17 


4-8 


Longmeadow 


5-2 


0-9 


WSpringfield 


7-13 


8-7 


Final Record: 6-12 





LEFT FIELDER Ken Kilduff unleashes 
a throw back to the infield. 



VARSITY BASEBALL 61 



*K'< 



■ ■.-"*■ 



JV BASEBALL. Front row: Mike Tranghese, Doug Bower. Back row: 
Poremba, Bill Brady, Matt Wallace. Sec- Coach Jon Starr, Eric Boduch, Andrew 
ond row: Adam Apple, Rob Thorpe, Tony Clines, Derek Gray, Rob Pridemore. 




FRESHMEN BASEBALL. Front Chris Bopp, Michael Ketschek. Back 

row: Nathan Howells, John Davenport, row: Jim McGrath, Michael Roberts, 

Jeff Wright, Michael Reich. Second row: Chris Wood, Coach Victor Berard. 
Brian Mondor, Michael DeFlorio, 



SMILING IN SATISFACTION, 
Nathan Howells hauls in a fly ball. 



KRISTIE KISNER gets ready for a 
ground ball at third base. Minnechaug 
lost to Ludlow, 13-11. 



62 





£«E»»a 




JV SOFTBALL. Front row: Anjana Kisner, Judy Maleckas. Back row: Amy 

Trivedi, Carrie Boudreau, Kellie Raczka, Spear, Kara Smith, Dana Shults, Sheila 

Stephanie Roj, Melanie Hsiao. Second O'Donnell, Stephanie Burke, Coach Dan 

row: Elizabeth Leahey, Jenn Pederzani, Balser. 
Trista deSousa, Erin Burke, Kristie 



Rising stars wouldn't stop until they were 



SATISFIED 



The JV Softball season 
was an experience for 
Coach Dan Balser. Not 
only did he have many experi- 
enced sophomores, but he re- 
ceived a new crop of freshmen. 
Among the sophomore stars 
were Kellie Raczka, Carrie 
Boudreau, Kristie Kisner, 
Sheila O'Donnell, and Trista 
deSousa. Promising freshmen 
included Melanie Hsiao, Amy 
Spear, Elizabeth Leahey, and 
Erin Burke. 

The team managed a 7 win, 



9 loss, and 1 tie season, which 
was better than the previous 
season's. 

With strong pitching and 
powerful hitting from Eric 
White, Doug Bower, Bob 
O'Neil, and Roy Legere, the 
team won some games, includ- 
ing a 20-0 romp over Chicopee. 

The freshmen enjoyed the 
intense hitting and skilled 
catching of Jim McGrath and 
the excellent fielding of Mike 
Reich. 



JV Softball 




Agawam 4-31 




Amherst 10-13 




Longmeadow 12-15 




ELongmeadow 6-22 




Chicopee Comp 19-8 


9-26 


Chicopee 23-6 


14-12 


Holyoke 17-9 


22-14 


Cathedral 7-22 


8-12 


Westfield 22-5 


16-7 


Ludlow 11-13 




WSpringfield 9-20 




Final Record: 7-9 





JV Baseball 




Holyoke 5-6 




Northampton 1 1-4 




South Hadley 6-5 




Cathedral 2-15 




ELongmeadow 3-5 




Chicopee Comp 8-8 




Ludlow 11-10 




Chicopee 20-0 




Westfield 4-12 


4-12 


Amherst 1-21 




1 Longmeadow 4-6 


3-9 


WSpringfield 6-7 


1-9 


Agawam 2-4 





Freshman Baseball 


Holyoke 1 1 


6 


Agawam 1 8 


3 4 2 


Ludlow 12 


11 6 4 


Chicopee Comp 12 


2 


East Longmeadow 7 


11 


Chicopee 4 


5 


Westfield 14 


4 


Amherst 1 8 





WSpringfield 8 


9 13 2 


Longmeadow 7 


11 1 5 


Final Record 5-9 



7*^ 




SETTING HIS SIGHTS on a 
fastball during a JV Baseball 
game against Cathedral, Bill 
Brady prepares to slam the ball for 
the win. 

AMY SPEAR looks across the 
diamond for the signs from Coach 
Dan Balser. 



JV SOFTBALL/JV AND FRESHMAN BASEBALL 63 



Varsity Softball 


Agawam 4-5 




Amherst 6-2 




Longmeadow 1-5 




E Longmeadow 16-1 




WSpringfield 0-3 


7-10 


Chicopee Comp 22-5 


12-2 


Chicopee 20-6 


10-7 


Holyoke 12-2 


10-0 


Cathedral 12-2 


6-0 


Westfield 15- 


9-4 


Ludlow 14 




22-0 




Final Record: 13-4 





SECOND BASEMAN Kristen 
Falzone (14) makes a tough, two- 
handed stop on a grounder. Kristen en- 
tered the game in the fifth inning. 




VARSITY SOFTBALL. Front 
R.row: Jen Samble, Amy Sullivan, 
Jodi Garceau, Lisa Kennedy. Second 
Row: Kristen Falzone, Sarah Hsaio, 
Stephanie Roj, Heather Wholley, 
Mandy Kober, Lauren Troy. Back 
Row: Nikki Bolek, Vail Mosier, 
Amanda Zepke, Amy Liese, Sara 
Taylor, Coach Art Tipaldi. 

LEFTFIELDER Vail Mosier (9) 
steps into the batter's box and anx- 
iously awaits the pitcher's delivery in 
a game against Ludlow. The Falcons 
easily beat Ludlow, 22-0, in five inn- 
ings. 



ROUNDING second base 

Heather Wholley pursues another 
homerun. Heather led the team in 
homeruns with three. 






;. 



64 VA 



SOFTBALL 




They rolled to a 13-4 regular season record, but when they 
met Agawam in the tournament, it was like 

RUNNING INTO A WALL 



It was only the top of the 
seventh inning, but the 
game was over. The spec- 
tators could feel it in the air — 
the Falcons didn't have any 
fight left in them. After giving 
it their all for 17 games, they 
just didn't have it on June 1, 
1990. 

The Agawam Brownies, 
their opponents, won the even- 
tual Western Massachusetts 
Championships and state run- 
ners-up. 

Agawam was angered by 
their seeding (fourth), which 
they believed was too low. They 
showed that they were right. 
From the first pitch, they domi- 
nated the Falcons, exploding 
for 11 runs. 

Even the presence on the side 
lines of Amanda Zepke, an out- 
fielder who had suffered a leg 
injury on May 22, failed to 
spark them. Rightfielder Amy 
Sullivan made an outstanding 
shoestring catch, but nothing 
would jump-start the stagnant 



offense. 

The Falcons managed just 
two runs against a tough 
Agawam defense. As they 
looked back to some of their 
regular season games, the hefty 
offensive outputs looked for- 
eign. A 22-0 victory over Lud- 
low and a 22-5 win against 
Chicopee Comp....both run to- 
tals seemed unattainable 
against an Agawam squad that 
was peaking just at the right 
time. 

As the game mercifully came 
to a close, Agawam relished an 
11-2 victory and the Falcons 
had nothing to celebrate. Senior 
Lisa Kennedy, who had just 
pitched her last high school 
game, fought back tears. Sure, 
they could seek solace in the 
fact that they'd had a successful 
13-5 season, something that 
many teams coveted. But solace 
would not give them a Western 
Massachusetts Championship, 
something they coveted. 







AMY SULLIVAN (16) strides 
into an offering from the pitcher. 
Teammates Kristen Falzone (14) 
and Lauren Troy (20) look on 
from behind the fence. 




A— -*■ 




SECOND BASEMAN Jodi 
Garceau (10) covers second base 
and takes a flip-throw from short- 
stop Jen Samble (19) during in- 
field practice. Jodi then turned 
and fired the ball to Heather 
Wholley (15). 

CATCHER Sara Taylor (12) 
awaits a warm-up pitch from Lisa 
Kennedy (18). Said Sara of her 
catching equipment, "It makes 
me look and fell like a Teenage 
Mutant Ninja Turtle." 



VARSITY SOFTBALL 65 



Despite a lack of experience, the girls' track team was 

SOMETHING TO FLIP FOR 



COACH Nikki Lyonnais shows 
her patented stare and hand posi- 
tion while intently watching the 
long jump competition in one of 
the afterschool meets. 




KELLI WALBRIDGE easily 
leads the pack in the 800m at the 
Northampton meet, which 
Minnechaug lost, 102-33. Kelli 
went to Western Mass for dis- 
tance. 



The girls' track team was 
young, but promising. 
The bulk of the team 
was made up of sophomores 
and freshmen. There was a gen- 
eral lack of experience on the 
team, but it was compensated 
for with fun. The memorable 
points of the season were 
Wendy Deshais taking a digger 
at the Chicopee Comp meet 
and Kelly Gilligan making her 
own course in the 440 yd. run. 
The track team is filled with 
promise and is something to 
look forward to in the years 
coming up. 



Western Massachusetts 
sprint qualifiers included 
Jessica Winn, Alexis Heede, 
Jana Tromblay, Sherry 
Decoteau, Kathy Bresette, 
Stephanie Pietryka, and Wendy 
Deshais. There was also a 
strong showing in distance by 
Kelli Walbridge and Amy Cur- 
rier. The throwers had support 
from Laura White, Jill 
Turcotte, Laurie Delisle, Kara 
Perkins, and Betsy Leritz. 

Most of the team will be 
returning to make the 1991 sea- 
son the best that it can be. 





GIRLS' TRACK. Front Row: Nancy 
Bigos, Laura White, Brandy Renn, Jen 
Sanders, Michelle Beaupre, Lisa Man- 
ning, Sue Withington, Jessica Winn, Jill 
Turcotte. Second Row: Stephanie 
Pietryka, Kelly Gilligan, Amy Cahill, 
Cathy Duffy, Barbara Fulton, Betsy 
Ross, Melissa Dolaher, Bridget Baron, 
Jana Tromblay, Jen Mackie, Jen Little, 



Heather Colclough, Wendy Deshais. 
Back Row: Coach Hal Miller, Maureen 
Dempsey, Betsy Leritz, Kathy Bresette, 
Laurie Delisle, Alexis Heede, Laura 
Gravelin, Kim Ingram, Sherry Decout- 
eau, Sara Marvaso, Amy Hitchcock, 
Amy Currier, Kelli Walbridge, Colleen 
Fitzgerald, Charity Manegre, Kara 
Perkins, Coach Nikki Lyonnais. 



66 GIRLS' TRACK 




JILL TURCOTTE ("Lady") anxiously 
watches the javelin soar through the air 
during her follow-through. Jill went to 
Western Mass. for javelin. And in addi- 
tion to throwing for the team, Jill also ran 
distance. 



J ANA TROMBLAY successfully com- 
pletes a practice jump before the long 
jump competition in one of the meets. 
Aside from the long jump competition, 
Jana qualified for Western Mass as a 
sprinter. 

AFTER easily clearing the first hurdle, 
Sara Valentine quickly prepares herself 
for the next one. Hurdling is one of the 
most difficult races in Track. Sara was a 
promising freshman who will help make 
this year the best ever. 




^"» .!_>.. 




Girls' Track 




Longmeadow 60 


70 


Westfield 47 


89 


Cathedral 25 


115 


Northampton 33 


103 


Agawam 80 


55 


WSpriBgfield 45 


91 


ChicopeeComp 68 


68 


Amherst 46 


90 


Final Record: 1-6-1 





HEATHER COLO-OUCH success- 
fully clears the bar during the high jump 
competition at one of the meets. Heather 
also ran distance for the team. 



GIRLS' TRACK 67 



With a great heritage before them, the boys' track 

team 

CONTINUED THE MOMENTUM 



The boys' track team had 
another very successful 
season. At the head of 
the team were multi-talented 
seniors Rob Kumming, Chris 
Baer, Ben Connell, Mark 
Isham, Jim DeForest and 
Randy Myers. 

The sprinting team was led 
by Brian Oglesby, Fred Hill, 
and Lee Atcheson. The dis- 
tance runners Rob Goettler and 
Ryan Trombly had a season 
marked with multiple suc- 
cesses. 

The field events were domi- 
nated by Sean Campbell, Gio 
Cirillo, Steve Schmuck, and Al 
Poremba. The track team had 
some very successful jumpers 



also. Fred Hill, Rylan Grant, 
and Walter Grono led this sec- 
tion of the team. 

The team competed very well 
all season. During Steel Relays, 
some very prominent talent 
showed through. 

There were victories in both 
Individuals and Western Mas- 
sachusetts. In order to compete 
in those two events, contestants 
must have met stringent re- 
quirements. Records were tied 
and some were broken. 

People came to support these 
athletes in rain and in shine. 
The boys' track team was A# 1 
in the eyes of its fans and hope- 
fully 1991's will only be better. 





FRED HILL runs to another victory in 
the 400 yard run during one of the 
meets. Fred also ran the 100m and did 
the long jump for Minnechaug. In fact, he 
was one of the leaders in the long jump. 

ROB KGMMING goes airborn for 
Minnechaug's track team in a meet 
against Central. They easily won the 
meet, 92-53. Rob was one of the multi- 
talented seniors leading the team to vic- 
tory. 






68 BOYS' TRACK 




QUICKLY GAINING MOMENTUM, 
Mark Isham prepares to hurl the discus 
through the air in a meet against Central. 
Minnechaug won the meet, 92-53. Mark 
was also one of the seniors leading the 
team. 



GIVING IT HIS ALL, Al Poremba 
pumps to beat his opponent in a tight 
race for the finish. Al was one of the 
leaders in the field events for the team, 
along with Steve Schmuck, Gio Cirillo, 
and Sean Campbell. 





!ci -*». 



Varsity Boys 


> 


Track 




Northampton 69 


76 


Holyoke 113 


32 


Longmeadow 94 


51 


Westfield 95 


45 


Cathedral 76 


69 


Agawam 90.5 


54.5 


Central 92 


53 


WSpringfield 101 


44 


ChicopeeComp 72 


73 


Final Record: 


7-2 



BS mt WE B 





A PRIVATE MOMENT TOGETHER is 
shared by Jim DeForest and Katie Lewis 
after the track meet. Jim was a talented 
senior who especially excelled in the dis- 
cus throw. 



CHRIS BAER hands off to Brian 
Oglesby during the 4x100 relay race. 
Chris graduated, but Brian will return in 
91. 



BOYS' VARSITY TRACK 
Front Row: Brian Oglesby, Steve 
Schmuck, Mark Is-ham, Randy 
Myers, Jason Bruno, Chris Baer, 
Jim DeForest, Rob Kumming, 
Ben Conneli, Fred Hill, Jed Dra- 
per. Second Row: Stephanie 
Ziobro, Robert Pafumi, Nathanial 
Emanual, Matt Zaft-Weissman, 
Clay Holds-worth, Gio Cirillo, Joe 
Sala, Ian Drenzek, Rylan Grant, 
Sean Overton, Walter Grono, Ja- 
son Matthews, Rob Goettler, 
Coach Jarvis. Back: Andrea Da- 
vid, Michelle Zhe, Jim Sullivan, 
Kenny Wiegel, Aaron Pilarcik, 
Charlie Beaupre, Nathania Scho- 
field, Jon Foumier, Scott Giles, 
Tom Gagnon, Brian Goodhind, 
Ray Bernard, Sean Campbell, 
Nathan Root, Adam Niziolek, Lee 
Atcheson, Henry Wawrzonek, 
Chris Smead, Caet Rodamilans, 
Bill Szafarowicz, Ryan Trombly, 
Al Poremba, Coach Bennett, 
Coach Dave. 



69BOYS' AND GIRLS' TRACK 69 




TACKLE Steve Croteau, guard 
Omar Asmar, and center Louis 
McCray strengthen the offensive 
line in front of quarterback Al Por- 
emba in the last few minutes of a 
close game. 



FANS Mara Gaudette, Sherry 
Decoteau, Carrie Boudreau, Sarah 
Demosthenous, Sarah McGahan, 
and Kim Ingram support the Fal- 
cons. 



70 VARSITY FOOTBALL 




/ARSITY FOOTBALL. Front: 
pan Skala. John Farrell, Steve 
Aeisner. Second: Al Poremba, Bren- 
Ian Daly, Jim Sullivan, Steve Cro- 
eau, Omar Asmar, Bryan Oglesby, 
Steve Schmuck, Ralph Dill, Ryan 
icott, Peter Dowd. Third: Eric White, 



Jim Dubord, Peter Rodgers, Tony 
Desjardins, Henry Wawrzonek, Jeff 
Young, Chris Hebert, Doug Albee, 
Louis McCray, Matt Glover. Fourth: 
Chris Wright, Mike Ketschek. Mike 
DeFlorio, Joe Sala, Jeff Murphy, 
Adam Niziolek, Jon Albano, Mike 



Poremba, Bill Brady, Derek Gior- 
dano. Back: Head Coach Dave Ben- 
nett, Kevin Maltby, Chris Tarantino, 
Sean Overton, Ray Bernard, Coaches 
John Morrissey, Junie Golfieri, and 
Russ Mooney. 



Varsity Football 


Longmeadow 




21-18 


Mt. St. Joseph 




14-21 


Northampton 




10-24 


Chicopce Comp 




7-0 


Holyoke 




6-13 


Agawam 




14-0 


Cathedral win by 


forfeit 




Westfield 




12-30 


Central 




16-18 


E. Longmeadow 




28-8 


Final Record: 5-5 







With a strong running game, the Falcons 

FOUGHT ANOTHER SEASON 
IN THE TRENCHES 



Minnechaug football 
again placed well in 
the AA conference, 
he team had a league record 
»f 3-3 and an overall record of 
i-5. The team was brought to- 
gether by senior captains Dan 
Jkala, John Farrell, and Steve 
4eisner. Dan Skala set a 
chool record with both num- 
>er of yards run and touch- 
lowns. He rushed for over 
500 total yards and was also 
he leading scorer in the AA 
inference with 94 points. He 
vas selected the Sunday Re- 
publican male athlete of the 
iveek during the season. 
Strong support on offense 
nd and defense was provided 
y Omar Asmar, John Farrell, 



Steve Croteau, Steve Meisner, 
and Steven Schmuck. There 
was plenty of talent with the 
juniors: quarterback Al Por- 
emba, end Eric White, center 
Louis McCray, center Matt 
Glover and running back Jim 
Dubord. Sophomores Bill 
Brady and Mike Poremba 
were also members of the team 
that could be relied on. 

The team played eventual 
Super Bowl champions Ho- 
lyoke tough, losing by only one 
touchdown. The game was 
played in the pouring rain, 
making the field a mud pit. 
Another well-played contest 
was the opening 21-18 victory 
over Longmeadow. 






LINEBACKER Mike DeFlorio 
fights through a block at the line of 
scrimmage against Cathedral. The 
game was played at Springfield Col- 
lege. 

QUARTERBACK Al Poremba 
calls the play in the offensive huddle. 
Minnechaug lost to Cathedral, 21-7, 
but was later awarded a forfeit victo- 
ry for the game. 



ATHLETIC TRAINER Jim Poulin 
patrols the sidelines at the Cathedral 
game. Jim was a valuable member of 
the football staff in helping the Fal- 
cons overcome injuries. 

PURSUED BY the Cathedral de- 
fense, quarterback Al Poremba pre- 
pares to pitch the ball to tailback Dan 
Skala. 



VARSITY FOOTBALL 71 



DEFENSIVE standouts George 
Colclough and Scott Korzon await 
the snap to the opposing quarter- 
back. The freshman football team, 
coached by Minnechaug graduates 
Bill Scatolini and Todd Bennett, fin- 
ished the season with a respectable 
5-3 record. 



PROMISING freshman quarter- 
back Matt Laraway surveys the field 
before receiving the snap from cen- 
ter. Offensive guard Chris Quinlivan 
and offensive tackle Tim Hebert pre- 
pare to set blocks on the opposing 
Ware defensive linemen. 







FRESHMAN FOOTBALL. Front 
row: Bryan Weller, Chris Mosellen, 
Dave Sagalyn, Dan Stevenson, Ethan 
Binns, Chris Dynak, Vesal Dini, Matt 
Laraway. Second row: Chip Chappel, 
Chris Quinlivan, Scott Korzon, Chip 
Perkins, Bill Gagnon, David Ten- 



i%tte*-i5g&% &£&*&& 



brook, George Colclough, Roger La- 
voie, Jason Kosek. Back row: Coach 
Bill Scatolini, Ryan Noonan, Mike 
Merigian, Tony Brunetti, Mark Har- 
yasz, Keith Kilduff, Jeff King, Tim 
Hebert, Corey Matthews, Coach 
Todd Bennett. 



JV FOOTBALL 


Longmeadow 


13-12 


Chicopee 


20-8 


Northampton 


0-6 


Chicopee Comp 


20-12 


Agawam 


. 22-6 


Cathedral 


0-19 


Ware 


0-6 


Ludlow 


25-8 


Final Record: 


5-3 



FR. FOOTBALL 


Longmeadow 


16-12 


Northampton 


8-12 


Chicopee Comp 


22-0 


Holyoke 


38-6 


Agawam 


30-14 


Cathedral 


33-6 


Westfield 


12-18 


Central 


20-12 


Final Record: 


5-3 




With talented young players, they 

BURST TO WINNING 
RECORDS 



Throughout the season, 
the J.V. football team 
experienced many 
hard-fought wins and some 
heart-breaking defeats. Quar- 
terback Bill Brady took con- 
trol of the offense, leading the 
team to a 5-3 record. Bill led 
the team in touchdowns, while 
Chris Tarantino and Tony 
Desjardins caught two and one 
touchdown passes respectively. 
Tailbacks Mike Poremba and 
Jim Dubord fortified a power- 
ful running attack. Diveback 
Jeff Murphy gave crushing 
blocks to spring the ball carri- 
er. Fullbacks Derek Giordano 
and Mike DeFlorio gave power 
to the short yardage situations. 
The linemen, Peter Dowd, Pe- 
ter Rodgers, Louis McCray, 
and Chris Hebert, deserved 
much credit for their skilled 
blocking. Other members of 
the team, Joe Sala, Chris 
Wright, Ray Bernard, Adam 
Niziolek, and Mike Ketschek, 
also gave Coach Russ Mooney 
a team that he could be proud 
of. 

The freshman football team 
also went 5-3. Coaches Bill 
Scatolini and Todd Bennett 
led the way in the winning sea- 
son. Under their guidance, the 
team showed their Minne- 



chaug pride and really kickk 
the "bunk" out of the opposiii 
teams. 

The backfield, with fullba 
Scott Korzon and tailback D 
vid Tenbrook, plowed up ail 
down the field with authorit 
The starting quarterbac 
Matt Laraway, showed 1 
stuff during the season. N» 
only did he lead the backfiei 
through the defense, but 
also completed several toucJ 
down passes and conversioi 
The offensive and defensi 
lines showed their strength a 
their size. Mark Haryasz a j 
Tim Hebert clearly dominat 
at tackle, and guards Cri 
Perkins and Chris Quinliv^ 
although most of the time thH 
were being yelled at for oil 
thing or another, performil 
well for the team. Center K* 
Myers used his brute streng^ 
to plow out gaping holes 
the seemingly unstoppal 
"30-slam." 

The team definitely had 
ups and downs, but Coa, 
Scat and Coach Todd tauj 
them about Minnechaug tra 
tion, style, and pride throui 
all of their stories. The coacl 
made the season one to 
member. 



72 JV/FROSH FOOTBALL 




;»■ 






JUMPING ON the pile. Chip Per- 
kins assists his teammates on a 
tackle of a Ware opponent. Minne- 
chaug lost a tough game to the Ware 
freshman squad, 60. 



CRADLING the football. Bill Gag- 
non bursts through the line after re- 
ceiving the handoff from quarterback 
Matt Laraway. Bill's run was set up 
by good blocking from Tim Hebert 
and Chris Quinlivan. 



JV/FROSH FOOTBALL 73 







*m*-m* 



BOYS' VARSITY SOCCER. 

Front row: Ten Tousignant, Jim Troy, 
Rylan Grant, Jason Robinson, Jim 
Anderson. Second row: Ray Royer, Mi- 
chael Spillane, Scott Sartwell, Doug 



Paige, Kevin Gottehrer, Todd Burger. 
Back row: Coach Art Tipaldi, Steve 
Chechette, Todd Shumate, Doug Bower, 
Chris Berte, Brendan Halloran, Matt 
Casey, Charlie Farrah, Bob O'Neil. 



With steady improvement over the past few years, 
boys' soccer will soon be 

BOOTING THEIR WAY TO 
VICTORIES 



Boys' Varsity Soccer was 
led by tri-captains Jim 
Troy, Rylan Grant, 
and Jason Robinson. A team 
dominated by youth improved 
from one win in '89 to four wins 
in '90. Rylan Grant's patented 
throw-ins were always a crowd 
favorite throughout a season 
that was sometimes frustrating. 
The Falcons were shut out in 
ten of twelve losses. Young 
players who joined the tri-cap- 
tains and other seniors Teri 
Tousignant and Jim Anderson 
were juniors Todd Burger, 



Todd Shumate, Doug Bower, 
Brendan Halloran, Matt Casey, 
Charlie Farrah, and Bob 
O'Neil; sophomores Ray 
Royer, Mike Spillane, Scott 
Sartwell, Doug Paige, Kevin 
Gottehrer, and Chris Berte. 
Freshmen Tom DeNucci and 
Eric Dolaher also saw varsity 
action. 

The JV soccer team scored 
their first winning record in 
several years. They went 8-7-1 
over the season, a vast improve- 
ment over their previous 
winless season. 




_ 

'FIELD Tom DeNucci looks to drill 
;s to a teammate in a 2-1 victory 
over Chicopee. 



74 BOYS' SOCCER 



VARSITY SOCCER 


Longmeadow 


0-3 


Agawam 1-0 


Chicopee Comp 


0-3 


Central 0-5 


Cathedral 


0-4 




Chicopee 


4-2 


0-2 


Amherst 


0-3 


1-0 


ELongmeadow 


1-0 


0-1 


WSpringfield 


0-5 




Ludlow 


0-5 




Westfield 


1-4 




Holyoke 


0-1 




Northampton 


2-3 





?J.zot 




h 








*■ 



I L 



i^M0 




VARSITY goalie Ray Royer 
blocks a shot on goal and boots 
the ball away. The varsity soccer 
team beat Chicopee's boosters, 
4-2, in a home game. 



JV SOCCER. Front row: David 
Labadorf, Bill Szafarowicz, Eric Boduch, 
Neil Nordstrom, Eric Dolaher. Second 
row: Chris MacFarlane, Matthew Emerle, 
Tom DeNucci, Steve Jack, Scott Giles, 



Kevin Smith. Back row: John Davenport, 
Jeremy Winn, Nathan Howells, Scott 
Liese, Jason Thomas, Craig Stitsinger, 
Greg Moore, Manager Jennifer Herbert, 
Coach Willie Jenkins. 




FRESHMAN SOCCER. Front 

row: Joshua Skiba, Shawn Motyka, 
Bryan McFarland, Dana Graham. Sec- 
ond row: John Lempart, Alex McGill, 



Brian Grondalski, David Provencher, Pe- 
ter Moon. Back row: Bill Metzger, Andre 
Piscioneri, Eric Baron, Jason Candage, 
Matt Dean, Coach Don Snow. 





1 JV SOCCER 




Longmeadow 


2-1 


Agawam 


0-4 


Chicopee Comp 


1-1 


Ludlow 


o^t 


Cathedral 


0-4 






Chicopee 


2-1 


0-3 




Amherst 


2-0 


1-0 




ELongmeadow 


1-0 


0-2 




WSpringfield 


0-1 






Central 


0-5 






Westfield 


0-3 






Holyoke 


1-0 






Northampton 


2-0 







IN THE VICTORY over Chicopee, 
Chris Berte beats a Chicopee opponent 
to the ball. 




IN A THROW-IN, fresh- 

man player Eric Baron locates a 
teammate downfield and prepares 
to hurl the ball to him from the 
sideline. 



BOYS' SOCCER 75 



TAKING on the Central goalie, 
Sarah Demosthenous attempts to 
beat her one-on-one. Despite her 
shot on goal, Minnechaug lost to 
Central, 4-0. 




mo 






mw ^wm m* 







VARSITY SOCCER. Front row: 
Mandy Kober, Christine Sarno, Amy Bar- 
ber, Anne Berte. Second row: Karen 
Granaudo, Kristie Kisner, Alexis Heede, 
Kerry Manning, Kathy Bresette, Kandy 



.***■# 



Belcher. Back row: Ali Loper, Michelle 
Derosier, Lani Hsiao, Rebecca Harris, 
Lauren Troy, Kristin Nelson, Lianne 
Cronin, Coach Jay Deely. 





JV SOCCER. Front row: Amy Cur- 
rier, Jen Little, Kealy O'Brien. Second 
row: Amy Beacom, Barbara Fulton, 
Elana Kingsbury, Pam Chase, Emily 
Blume, Sara Morton, Courtney Trombly. 



^ 



1 



IN THE CONTEST against 

league opponent Central, junior 
Kristie Kisner boots the ball from 
midfield toward her opponent's 
goal. 



VARSITY SOCCER 


Holyoke 


1-3 


0-3 




ELongmeadow 


2-3 


3-2 




Central 


0-4 


1-5 




Northampton 


2-3 


West Side 


0-6 


Cathedral 


1-4 


Westfield 


0-2 


Comp 


2-0 


Chieopee 


2-3 


Longmeadow 


3-5 


Agawam 


0-8 


Amherst 


3-1 


Ludlow 


0-9 



Back row: Kerry Amsden, Angela 
Hebert, Cara Peck, Kelly Gilligan, Kelli 
Walbridge, Amy Wright, Erin Gillen, Amy 
Hitchcock, Coach Dan Balser. 





JV 




Holyoke 


3-2 0-0 




ELongmeadow 


4-5 4-2 




Central 


3-0 2-1 




Northampton 


2-0 West Side 


0-2 


Cathedral 


0-2 Westfield 


3-1 


Comp 


3-0 




Longmeadow 


2-0 Agawam 


2-3 


Amherst 


9-0 Ludlow 


3-0 



76 GIRLS' SOCCER 





PREPARING to send the ball out of 
her end, sophomore Lauren Troy concen- 
trates on kicking the ball to the varsity 
offense downfield in the Central loss. 



After another disappointing season, the varsity soccer 
team looks for 

THE LIGHT AT THE END OF 
THE TUNNEL 



The varsity soccer team 
looked to improve over its pre- 
vious two-win season. The team 
did accomplish that goal, but 
not to their satisfaction. They 
won only three games over the 
course of the season. A strong 
nucleus of underclassmen and a 
JV team that recorded ten vic- 
tories give the varsity soccer 
program hope for the light at 
the end of the tunnel. 

The team was led by seniors 
Amy Barber, Vail Mosier, 
Mandy Kober, Alexis 
Heede, Sarah Hsiao, Anne 
Berte, Kerry Manning, and Sa- 
rah Demosthenous. Junior con- 
tributors were Kristie Kisner, 
Kandy Belcher, Karen 
Granaudo, Kathy Bresette, and 
Ali Loper. Rounding out the 
team were sophomores Lani 
Hsiao, Christine Sarno, 
Michelle Derosier, Rebecca 




Harris, Lauren Troy, Kristin 
Nelson, Lianne Cronin, and 
freshman Elana Kingsbury. 

A rash of injuries sent the 
Falcons reeling early in the sea- 
son. Sarah Hsiao suffered a bro- 
ken collarbone, Kristin Nelson 
severely sprained her ankle dur- 
ing tryouts, and Sarah 
Demosthenous and Vail Mosier 
both required crutches to ma- 
neuver after spraining their an- 
kles. The ankle bug also got to 
Lani Hsiao before the season 
even started, and it found vic- 
tims in both Michelle Derosier 
and Amy Barber. By far the 
worst injury was a broken leg, 
suffered by Kealy O'Brien in 
her varsity debut. Hopefully 
the team can overcome the bad 
luck of this season and the inju- 
ries will not haunt the team in 
seasons to come, in which they 
hope to be victorious. 




HQHH 



THE JV soccer team gathers for a 
cheer before their game against Central. 
They recorded a 3-0 shutout for one of 
their ten victories over the course of the 
season. 

HURLING the ball in-bounds is fresh- 
man JV player Kerry Amsden. The JV 
team, coached by Dan Balser, ended the 
season with a 10-4-1 record. 



GIRLS' SOCCER 77 



SECOND year member of 
the team Elizabeth Leahey 
shows her sophomore spirit for 
the gymnastics team. 





GYMNASTICS TEAM. Front 
row: Amy Jenkinson, Co-captain 
Kara Welch, Co-captain Tara Daly, 
Bonnie Hanson. Back row: Manager 
Kristin Belcher, Elizabeth Leahey, 



Lori Pyzocha, Melissa Dolaher, 
Breanne L'Heureux, Christine Logan, 
Tara O'Connor, Sharon Belcher, 
Manager Angie Durant. 




TEAM member Melissa Do- 
laher strikes a pose. As a soph- 
omore, Melissa made the sec- 
ond-team all-Western Mass. 



With team unity and will power, they reached 

THE WESTERN MASS. 
CHAMPIONSHIPS 



A wailing scream rang 
throughout the Cathe- 
dral gym as one of 
their gymnasts broke her an- 
kle. Luckily, the Minnechaug 
gymnastics team was able to 
make it to the Western Mass. 
Championships without suffer- 
ing any injuries as horrible as 
this. However, knee syn- 
dromes, dislocated thumbs, 
hand "rips," pulled muscles, 
and strained hip flexors found 
victims on the team. 

The eleven girls on the team 
proved to be strong, always 
pushing themselves just a little 
bit harder. The team was led 
by co-captains Kara Welch 
and Tara Daly. Extra will- 
power coupled with all-around 
abilities gave them nothing to 
be ashamed of when they 
earned a fourth-place finish in 
all of Western Mass. 

Junior Amy Jenkinson said. 



"We had a lot of new contribu- 
tors to the team. We all 
worked very hard in achieving 
the fourth-place position at the 
Western Mass. Champion- 
ships. I hope we can beat Ca- 
thedral next year!" 

"I'm really going to miss 
gymnastics and the team when 
I leave. I'm glad everyone got 
along so well. It was a team 
effort and we worked really 
hard. I wish the team the best 
of luck next year," said senior 
co-captain Tara Daly, whose 
favorite event was the floor. 

Freshman Sharon Belcher, 
whose favorite events were the 
floor and the bars, added, "I've 
been doing gymnastics for sev- 
en years and I've never felt 
more a part of a team than I 
did this year. Everyone sup- 
ported everyone else and that 
really helped to bring the team 
together." 



78 GYMNASTICS 




CO-CAPTAIN Tara Daly was a 
four-year member of the team. She 
was selected to second-team all- 
Western Mass. 



COMPLETING her third year on 
the gymnastics squad, junior Bonnie 
Hanson was a valuable member of 
the team. 

SELECTED to the second-team 
all-Western Mass. team as a fresh- 
man, Sharon Belcher showed her tal- 
ent. 





GYMNASTICS 


Cathedral 106-114 




Chicopec Comp 1 12-84 


121 1-122.6 


Amhcrsl 107.1-118.1 




Pitlsfield 107.1-107.4 


1 14.7-109.8 


Hampshire II 1.6-1 15.5 


1 19.85-1 20.75 


Central 116.35-84.45 




W Springfield 116.35-79.50 




South Hadlcy 1 14.7-101.3 


119.85-106.7 


Longmeadow 120.6-87,5 





A HASTY tape-job by trainer Jim 
Poulin has Kara Welch ready to prac- 
tice. Kara was an all-Western Mass. 
gymnast despite suffering a hand in- 
jury. 



GYMNASTICS 79 




BOYS' CROSS COUNTRY. Front 
row: David Selvia, Ryan Trombly, 
Rob Goettler, Kevin Sheran, Colby 
Smith. Second row: Jeff Moore, Rich- 
ard Ng, Andy Henshon, Tom Gagnon, 



****?& 



Mark Tromblay, Chris Smead. Back 
row: Coach Marty Barrett, Aaron Pi- 
larcik. Ken Wegiel, Rob Pridemore, 
Rob Thorpe, Griff Noble, Manager 
Carrie Talbot. 



Boys' 




Cross Country 




Northampton 


18-45 


Central 


15-50 


Cathedral 


27-28 


Amherst 


30-25 


Palmer 


19-42 


Chicopee 


15-50 


Longmeadow 


23-34 


Westfield 


25-32 


E Longmeadow 


25-32 


Chicopee Comp 


21-40 


W Springfield 


1 6-45 


Holyoke 


26-29 



Girls ' Cross Country 


Northampton 


32-24 


Central 


20-39 


Amherst 


50- 1 5 


Cathedral 


50-15 


Palmer 


37-18 


Chicopee 


22-35 


Westfield 


47-15 


i Longmeadow 


44-16 


E Longmeadow 


38-18 


Chicopee Comp 


1 3-44 


W Springfield 


20-37 


Holyoke 


25-33 





GIRLS' CROSS COUNTRY. Front 
Row: Jill Turcotte, Mara Gaudette, 
Kim Ingram. Back Row: Sara Valen- 



tine, Hilary Brown, Nina Turcotte, 
Maureen Dempsey, Alison Moore, 
Coach Hal Miller. 



80 CROSS COUNTRY 



With sixteen wins between the two cross 
country teams, they showed how 

TO BE DYNAMOS 



Boys' cross country re- 
turned again to excel- 
lence. The biggest team 
in recent memory was led by 
junior co-captains Rob 
Goettler and Ryan Trombly. 
They finished off the regular 
season with an impressive 11-1 
record, falling only to defend- 
ing Western Mass champion, 
Amherst. The highlight of the 
season was a victory over Ca- 
thedral in dual meet competi- 
tion for the first time in 24 
years. 

The team capped off the 
season with a 2nd place finish 
at the Western Mass Coaches 
Invitational Meet, bowing 
once again to Amherst. What 
led to the team's success was a 
mixture of improving veterans, 
quality newcomers, and hard 
work. Goettler maintained his 
tradition of excellence, and 
Trombly, although new to 
cross country, quickly learned 
the ropes. Aaron Pilarcik, 
Chris Smead, and Kevin 
Sheran turned in consistent 
seasons to help the Falcons. 
Although he was the self-pro- 



claimed JV captain, Rob 
Thorpe improved greatly to 
come up with some key points 
for the varsity. Other contribu- 
tors included Tom Gagnon, 
Andy Henshon, and Mark 
Tromblay. The team figures to 
continue its dynamic reputa- 
tion. 

The girls' cross country 
team was young with infinite 
potential. New runners, Nina 
Turcotte, Hilary Brown, Sara 
Valentine, and Kim Ingram 
turned in fine performances. 
The team was led by captains 
Jill Turcotte and Mara Gau- 
dette, along with other return- 
ee, Maureen Dempsey. 

Nina Turcotte and Mara 
Gaudette were the top finish- 
ers on a squad that often sang 
while they ran. According to 
Mara, the scariest meet was 
against Holyoke. "We were 
warned about bears, forced to 
cross a wide and very deep 
stream. We then ran up a hill 
with about a one-and-a-half 
foot space between steep 
drops." 




ON HER WAY to a great finish, 
speedy Nina Turcotte shows the 
form that earned her a varsity letter 
as a freshman. In the tri-meet, Minne- 
chaug beat Chicopee but lost to 
Palmer. 



INTENTLY checking the team's 
stats, distance dynamos Kevin 
Sheran and Tom Gagnon look at 
Coach Marty Barrett's figures to see 
the score and their times. 



KEEPING pace together are 
distance dynamos Matt Nelson 
and Griff Noble. Matt and Griff 
both ran for the JV boys' cross 
country team. 





CO-CAPTAIN of the girls' 
cross country team Mara Gau- 
dette is well ahead of her oppo- 
nents in a tri-meet against Chi- 
copee and Palmer. 










SENDING the ball down the field, 
junior Stephanie Roj shows her defensive 
ability. Despite a good defensive effort, 
Minnechaug lost to East Longmeadow, 
2-0. 

CO-CAPTAIN Candy Arslanian 
fights past her East Longmeadow oppo- 
nents. Candy completed her fourth sea- 
son on the varsity. 




82 FIELD HOCKEY 



V FIELD HOCKEY 

WSpringfield 0-0 0-2 

Southwick 0-6 1-9 

Longmeadow 0-2 1-2 

Holyoke 1-1 

Agawam 0-0 0-2 

ELongmeadow 1-1 

Westfield 0-2 0-0 

Athol 2-3 

Final Record: 2-7-5 



JV FIELD HOCKEY 

WSpringfield 0-1 0-0 

Southwick 0-2 0-4 

Longmeadow 0-1 0-2 

Holyoke 1-1 

Agawam 0-1 0-1 

ELongmeadow 0-0 1 -0 

Athol 1-1 

Final Record: 1-7-4 




2^n^L^ 








I g^ y^^ , ^ B , 




RSITY FIELD HOCKEY Simons . Back row: Manager Kara 

-AM. Front row: Jennifer Lynch. Perkins, Amy Spear, Cynthia Brescia, 

cond row: Cathy Gagnon, Ellen Stephanie Roj, Betsy Leritz, Heather 

llivan, Tara Reavey, Tania Fernandez, Colclough, Stephanie Pietryka, Jana 

san Pierce, Angela Brunelle, Amity Tromblay, Coach Sharon Flagg. 




V FIELD HOCKEY TEAM. 

ont row: Erin Burke, Vanessa 
ernandez. Second row: Gretchen 
oody, Carrie Hapgood, Nikki Potvin, 



Kimberly Ober, Linda Walling. Back row: 
Meghan Freed, Amy Smith, Stephanie 
Burke, Shura Gural, Christine Vecchio, 
Coach Lisa Crum. 



Trying to live up to expectations was difficult, but the 
season gave hope to the 

CHICKS 
WITH STICKS 



The Falcon field hockey 
team was a spirited 
group. They started the 
season with grueling tryouts on 
those hot summer days, having 
high hopes of making the tour- 
nament for the second year in a 
row. Throughout the beginning 
of the season, Coach Sharon 
Flagg and the team worked 
extremely hard to try to achieve 
their goal of back-to-back tour- 
nament berths. When they real- 
ized that this would not hap- 
pen, they pulled together as a 
team unit and made the season 
a worthwhile one. 

The offense, comprised of 
seniors Candy Arslanian, 
Jennifer Lynch, Cathy Gagnon, 
Tania Fernandez, juniors Jana 
Tromblay, Heather Colclough, 
Stephanie Pietryka, Cynthia 
Brescia, sophomores Angela 
Brunelle, and Amy Spear, was 
constantly putting in the effort 
to score a goal, but managed 
only ten goals in fourteen 
games against the stingy de- 
fenses of other Western Mass. 
field hockey teams. Seniors 
Susan Pierce, Tara Reavey, 
Ellen Sullivan, juniors Betsy 
Leritz, Stephanie Roj, and 
sophomore goalie Amity Si- 




mons built a strong wall to 
defend the Minnechaug goal, 
giving up an average of only 2 
goals per game. 

The coaching corps, led by 
head coach Sharon Flagg, re- 
ceived help from first-year JV 
coach Lisa Crum. Kara Perkins 
handled the managerial work 
with ease. 

Even though the field hockey 
team did not have a winning 
record, they had a lot of fun in 
this memorable season. No one 
will forget the days the field 
hockey players came to school 
with pigtails (they even 
PLAYED with the pigtails!), 
face paint, bright green knee 
socks, slippers, and stuffed ani- 
mals. Hard work and intensity 
make another tournament sea- 
son a realistic goal for the 
young team. Although the team 
is losing seven seniors, the nine 
sophomores and juniors look to 
return Minnechaug field 
hockey to the top once again 
with help from the JV team. 
The team left its mark, how- 
ever, and no one will forget the 
tremendous spirit and will of 
the Falcon "chicks with 
sticks." 



IN THE VICTORY over East 
Longmeadow, Christine Vecchio looks to 
pass the ball to the offense for a scoring 
opportunity. The JV team won their last 
home game against East Longmeadow, 
1 -0, for their first hard-fought victory of 
the season. 



OFFENSIVE standouts Cynthia 
Brescia and Cathy Gagnon pursue the 
ball around midfield, looking to push the 
ball toward opponent East 
Longmeadow's goaJ. Despite their effort, 
Minnechaug was shut out in their final 
home game of the season. 



FIELD HOCKEY 83 



FCJLL OF ENERGY, Jen Mackie 
cheers on the Falcons. Even the cold 
weather doesn't stop the J.V. cheer- 
leaders from calling out the cheers. 

GO! FIGHT! WIN! Erin LeRay 
shouts cheers to the Varsity Football 
Team. Her enthusiasm encourages the 
Falcons to beat Cathedral. 



FRIENDS THROUGH IT ALL 

Kristie Mitchell, Lauren Troy, and Betsy 
Ross are still able to smile during the cold 
November weather. 





Long hours of practicing routines, and choreographing 
dances, make the cheerleaders 

SOME KIND OF WONDERFUL 



To kick off this year, var- 
sity cheerleaders at- 
tended the Universal 
Cheerleading Association 
camp. There were a lot of 
sleepy eyes and sore muscles. 
Their determination brought 
them first and second place rib- 
bons, along with a spirit stick 
and trophy. Kara Ruscio com- 
mented, "Camp helped us to 
get to know each other better, 
to work together better as a 
squad." 

This year's squad, except for 
senior captain Amber Quist, 
were all new. When Amber was 
asked if it was hard to work 
with a whole new squad she 
said, "Yes, but it was definitely 
rewarding! We have come such 
a long way; definitely a team to 



be proud of." Making the jurtn 
from J.V. to Varsity took sonr 
getting used to. Lynn Gil agre I 
by saying, "There is much mo 
unity and requires more won 
but, in the end it's all won 
while because of competition 
Although the majority may 1 
inexperienced, it won't stc 
them from competing in Febr: 
ary and March. 

The J.V. squad is also fro 
scratch. Andrea David sail 
"We had to start from the b 
ginning and teach them the b 
sics ..." Teaching the majori 
of the squad what cheerleadh 
is all about is a tough job f 
coach Gail Raczka, but tl 
girls are giving it their all, ar 
it shows! 



DURING HALF TIME 

cheerleading coach Lois Mitchell and 
Mrs. Genest talked about the football 
game. They discuss whether 
Minnechaug has a good chance of beat- 
ing Cathedral. 



VARSITY CHEERLEADING. 

Front row: Lori Estrada, Kristen Falzone, 
Amber Quist, Amy Kraus. Middle row: 
Nicole Bluteau, Sandy Donnelly, Kim 
Forrant, Erin LeRay, Lynn Gil. Back row: 
Kara Ruscio, Colleen Fitzgerald, Wendy 
Deshais, Betsy Ross, Kristie Mitchell, 
Coach Lois Mitchell. 



84 CHEERLEADING 




AfeiiS . 





JUNIOR VARSITY CHEER- 
LEADING. Front Row: Sara 
McCurry, Jennifer Mercure, Captain 
Andrea David, Becky D'Amato, Jennifer 
Chiecko, Middle Row: Kay Moriarty, Sara 
Bennett, Jennifer Mackie, Jessica 
Mercure, Jennifer Patullo. Back Row: 
Coach Gail Raczka, Jodi Sheperd, 
Rachael Bannon, Shiloh Napolitan, Tif- 
fany Drenzek. 



GETTING the crowd to join in. Am- 
ber Quist, Kristen Falzone, and Kristie 
Mitchell lead the squad in a cheer during 
half-time. As they know, psyching up the 
crowd isn't an easy job. 



CHEERLEADING 85 



HUSTLING down the court, 
Chris Berte drives to the baseline 
with a left handed move by his 
opponent. 





VARSITY BASKETBALL. 

Front row: Jason Carr, Chris Berte, Chad 
Brown. Second row: Neil Nordstrom, 
Brian Bishop, Adam Apple, Walter 



Grono. Back row: Coach Tom Cebula, 
Dan Truesdale, Kevin Burger, Rob 
Pridemore, Paul Kozub, Chris Lynch. 



W- **" 




CONCENTRATING on 

reading the defense, sophomore 
forward Paul Kozub looks to make 
a move by his opponent. 



Their record may not be the greatest, but they are 

LEAENING TO WORK AS A 
TEAM 



The boys' varsity basketball 
team has faced a very tough 
season. They have played many 
aggressive teams, such as Cen- 
tral, Cathedral, and Com- 
merce. But through it all, this 
team was able to keep their 
spirits high, and they managed 
to have a very enjoyable season. 

Many members of the team 
remember all the fun that they 
had on the bus rides, with a 
musical extravaganza led by 
Chris Lynch, the jukebox. They 
also remember the excitement 
when they won their first game. 
Another memorable moment 
for players and fans alike oc- 
curred in the home opener. As 
a player from Commerce drove 
to the basket for a slam dunk, 
he shattered the glass back- 
board. It took two weeks to 
replace the broken backboard! 

The team was led by co-cap- 
tains Chris Berte, Chad Brown, 
and Jason Carr. Seniors Kevin 
Burger, Dan Truesdale, Adam 



Apple, and Brian Bishop were 
also members of the team. They 
were joined by juniors Chris 
Lynch, Rob Pridemore, and 
Neil Nordstrom, and sopho- 
mores Walter Grono and Paul 
Kozub. 

Chris Berte was the leading 
scorer in the league, but an 
injured thumb kept him out of 
action for a game. Before his 
injury, the team gave the home 
crowd a thrill in a last minute 
victory over West Springfield, 
winning 55-53. As West Side 
came down the court at the end 
of the game looking to tie, 
Walter Grono stole the ball and 
scored on a lay-up. 

A bright future awaits the 
Falcons, who have a number of 
sophomores and juniors on the 
squad. Co-captain and top 
scorer Chris Berte is only a 
sophomore, and other starter 
Rob Pridemore and Chris 
Lynch are juniors. 



am 

1 



86 BOYS' BASKETBALL 




TO SPEED the game up, Rob 
Pridemore sprints down court for the 
lay-up. The varsity lost this game against 
Holyoke 85 to 53. 




V BASKETBALL 


Commerce 


0- 


Amherst 


0- 


South Hadley 


0- 


Northampton 


0- 


Holyoke 


53- 85 


Central 


47-111 


Cathedral 


59-110 


Ludlow 


63- 50 


Putnam 


0- 


Longmeadow 


67- 63 


WSpringfield 


0- 


Agawam 


0- 


Chicopee Comp 


0- 


Westfield 


0- 



IN AM ATTEMPT to fool the op- 
posing center, center Chad Brown, a 
senior co-captain, pump fakes and drives 
down the lane for a lay-up against his 
Holyoke opponents. 

A LIGHTNING-quick pass to the 
middle around the Holyoke defense is 
delivered by junior point guard Meil 
Nordstrom. 




THE TEAM pulls together during a 
time out and listens attentively to the 
strategy of Coach Tom Cebula. Coach 
Cebula, a Minnechaug graduate, finished 
his first season as head coach. 

SHOWING good form and concen- 
tration, junior forward Chris Lynch 
shoots from the foul line. Sophomore 
guard Chris Berte looks on, pulling for his 
teammate. 



BOYS' BASKETBALL 87 



JUNIOR forward Matt Casey 
makes a quick move past an am- 
bitious Holyoke player. With this 
basket, Matt helped maintain his 
season average of 8 points per 
game. 





STANDING POISED, 

freshman Mark Tromblay shoots 
a free throw. The basket closes 
the margin of victory in the Ludlow 
game. 



Although the refereeing was terrible and the opponents 

talented, 

JV PULLED OFF A WIN 



On January 15, the JV 
basketball team com- 
peted against Ludlow 
at home. To that date the team 
was a depressing 0-8, but, as 
Matt Casey put it "Good things 
come to those who wait. We 
just happen to wait longer than 
everybody else." 

The waiting did pay off and 
we won 42-38. Center Mark 
Kulis got the opening tap. The 
pace slowed down, the score 
was 14-8 in the first eight min- 
utes. The group gained more 
composure with a few fast- 
breaks, but a lack of rebound- 
ing on the Falcolns allowed 
Ludlow to attain a 22-18 
halftime lead. 

After Coach Crawford's in- 




ATTEMPTING to start the night off 
right, junior Mark Kulis jumps amazingly 
high for the opening tap of the game. 



spirational halftime speech, 
Minnechaug exploded with a 
10-0 run. Neil Nordstrom and 
Scott Liese added great defense 
to keep that team from scoring 
late into the second half. The 
score was tied 36-36. Matt 
Casey was fouled and sunk 
both his free throws, putting 
the team on top. The victory 
was capped by 2 plays by Andy 
Henshon, one, a baseline 
jumpshot, the other a 30 foot 
high celebration throw of the 
ball in victory even though the 
time hadn't expired. 

In the immortal words of 
Mark Tromblay at the end of 
the game, as quoted by his sis- 
ter, "Here we come NBA." 



J V Basketball 


Commerce 


45- 63 


Amherst 


50- 97 


South Hadley 


54- 57 


Northampton 


37- 67 


Holyoke 


55- 67 


Central 


43-103 


Cathedral 


50- 75 


Ludlow 


42- 38 


Putnam 


62- 67 


Longmeadow 


58- 79 


WSpringfield 


63-70 


Agawam 


60-78 


Chicopee Comp 


52-66 


Westfield 


53-46 



Freshman Basketball 


ELongmeadow 


47-56 


Amherst 


37-54 42-69 


Chicopee Comp 


41-79 


Cathedral 


39-71 


Ludlow 


47-54 


Longmeadow 


43-42 


WSpringfield 


36-38 


Agawam 


29-61 


Chicopee 


39-52 





JV/FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 




JV BASKETBALL. Front Row: Henshon. Back Row: Henry Wawrzonek, 

Mark Tromblay, Mark Kulis, Matt Casey. Eric White, Scott Liese, Roy Legere, 

Second Row: Ryan Trombly, Tom Coach Crawford. 
Gagnon, Jay Gagliarducci, Andy 








FRESHMAN BASKETBALL. 

Front Row: Mike Mageau, Dave Sagalyn, 
Bill Metzger, Jeff Burr, Kevin Sheran, 
Alex McGill, Dana Graham. Back Row: 




Coach Russ Mooney, Robert Tromblay, 
Chris Kerbel, Colin Schmitt, Tim Hebert, 
Matt Laraway, George Colclough, Brian 
Musiak. 

CONFIDENT that his team will 
score a win, coach Bob Crawford glances 
at the scoreboard. 



THE ARMS of the opposition are 
flying everywhere as junior Eric White 
reaches for a loose ball. Eric's playing 
time was cut short this season be- 
cause of an injury. 



JV/FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 89 




GIRLS' VARSITY BASKET- 

BALL. Front row: Jill Turcotte, Jen 
Grono, Sara Taylor. Second row: Kristie 
Kisner, Courtney Trombly, Stephanie 



Belcher, Manager Peter Rodgers. Back 
row: Coach Dave Bennett, Amy Liese, 
Kerry Amsden, Laura Gravelin, Kealy 
O'Brien, Allison Geldart, Manager Clar- 



Pietryka, Elana Kingsbury, Kandy ence Martin. 





pLil 


H**ll 


i ® ft T ClTEL 




1 \J ^CJW jr-^i. mbmUk 






1 ■**** i 






> i/\ Js%| J " !i 1 


M jk. 





GIRLS' JV BASKETBALL. 

Front row: Erin Burke, Jessica Lydon. 
Second row: Nina Turcotte, Kelli 
Walbridge, Rosemary Jackson, Pam 
Lessard, Janet Bishop. Back row: Coach 



Bill Griffith, Manager Clarence Martin, 
Courtney Stolarcyk, Hillary Brown, Jen 
Kotomski, Manager Peter Rodgers, 
Assitant Coach Kelly Burke. 



DURING an out-of-bounds play, 
Allison Geldart looks for the open outlet. 
Allison scored a three-point basket at the 
buzzer as the Falcons narrowly lost, 44- 
41, to Chicopee Comp. 




fc=S 



v fl 



90 GIRLS' BASKETBALL 





w* 



The effort was always there, but 

THE BALL BOUNCED 
THE OTHER WAY 



High hopes preceded the 
girls' basketball sea- 
son. Coach Dave 
Bennett expected that team 
speed would overcome a lack of 
height. Unfortunately, shooting 
woes ended any hopes of a win- 
ning season. One area in which 
the Falcons improved was on 
defense. Most points scored by 
opponents were on offensive 
rebounds. 

The team was led by junior 
captain Jen Grono. Seniors 
Sara Taylor and Jill Turcotte, 
along with junior returning 
lettermen Amy Liese, Kandy 
Belcher, Laura Gravelin, 
Allison Geldart, Kristie 
Kisner, and Kealy O'Brien also 
comprised the team. Freshman 
Courtney Trombly started ev- 
ery game and proved to be an 
impact player. Two other fresh- 
men, Kerry Amsden and Elana 
Kingsbury, were able to gain 
valuable varsity experience. 

JV coach Bill Griffith and 
assistant Kelly Burke were able 
to help Coach Bennett spark his 
troops. Kelly, a soccer player 
who graduated from 
Minnechaug, was able to give a 
few pointers on soccer, anyway. 





V BASKETBALL 


Monson 


33-51 




Wilb.Mons. 


41-13 




ELongmeadow 


38-44 




Holyoke 


29-37 




Chicopee Comp 


41-44 




Cathedral 


16-53 




Chicopee 


17-50 




WSpringfield 


32-51 




Westfield 


26-59 




Northampton 


32-68 


24-65 


Longmeadow 


24-56 


25-63 


Central 


31-51 


45-52 


Agawam 


22-44 


28-71 


Amherst 


30-61 


19-60 



Bill immortalized the line "cry 
me a river" when he told 
Allison Geldart to do that. He 
was also a fashion expert, with 
white socks and penny loafers. 
He openly expressed dislike for 
tie-dyed shirts and granolas, 
only a term Coach Bill would 
use. Peter Rodgers, Clarence 
Martin, and Rosemary Kirk 
managed the team ably and 
provided an extra cheering sec- 
tion for the team. Pete even 
tried to take over the coaching 
job once in a while, but Coach 
Bennett stood his ground, bad 
knee and all! 

A disappointing season 
wasn't helped when Allison 
Geldart suffered two ankle in- 
juries, one at the beginning of 
the season and one in the mid- 
dle of the season. Kealy 
O'Brien was still recovering 
from that freak soccer injury in 
which she broke a bone. JV 
players Janet Bishop and Erin 
Burke each injured a finger. 
Perhaps the worst moment of 
the season occurred when the 
team bus left Westfield High 
without Hillary Brown. You 
can be sure the girls will keep 
on truckin' down that court. 



JV BASKETBALL 


Monson 


27-31 


ELongmeadow 


30-23 


Holyoke 


40-25 


Chicopee Comp 


29-49 


Cathedral 


14-43 


Chicopee 


17-23 


WSpringfield 


17-38 


Westfield 


33-19 


Northampton 


13-42 


Longmeadow 


26-36 


Central 


17-28 


Agawam 


11-38 


Amherst 


26-27 



AFTER the referee (not pic- 
tured) blows the whistle, Courtney 
Trombly looks to see what the call 
is, hoping that it's not against her. 
The other referee and a Comp 
opponent also awaited the call. 




L 


#4 


B, X;'J| 


#15 i 

t, | J 




1 






m 


N 

1 





ON A FAST break, center 
Kerry Amsden drives by the Comp 
team to the hoop for a lay-up after 
a defensive rebound. The JV team 
lost to Chicopee Comp, 49-29, to 
put their record at 3-2 after the 
first five games. 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL 91 



IN THE GIANT slalom, ju- 

nior skier Sherry Decoteau hides 
behind her goggles and shows her 
exceptional form as she flies by 
one of the slalom gates in an early 
season Berkshire East competi- 
tion. 





LOOKING AHEAD 

Courtney Ware finishes a sharp 
turn on the Slalom course. 

JUNIOR Betsy Leritz demon- 
strates her great ability as she 
skis at Berkshire East in a Giant 
Slalom course. 




BOYS' SKIING. Front row: Chris 
Mosellen, Lane Wuerthele, David Selvia, 
Doug Paige. Second row: Todd 
Shumate, Michael Reich, Eric Sagalyn, 
Griff Noble, Greg Mascaro, Bill 



Fridlington. Back row: Assistant Coach 
Brian Howard, Jim Troy, Jim Blondek, 
Brendan Halloran, Ted Furst, Coach 
Stephanie Quirk. 





GIRLS' SKIING. Front row: Kellie 
Raczka, Michelle Derosier, Lauren Troy, 
Alison Tipaldi. Back row: Assistant 
Coach Brian Howard, Sherry Decoteau, 



Courtney Ware, Sarah Demosthenous, 
Betsy Leritz, Kathy Bresette, Coach 
Stephanie Quirk. 




92 BOYS' AND GIRLS' SKI TEAMS 




TRYING to psych himself up, Bill 
Fridlington concentrates hard on his up- 
coming race. Ski racing involves total 
concentration both before and during the 
race. 



GIANT SLALOMS can be diffi- 
cult. Gritting her teeth on a difficult 
course, Lauren Troy rounds a gate. 



1 






I 




' -*.- - 




MH^H ,-■ *$? 


gl 




y^^^^t 





■ 



^r 





Tests for the Ski Team cannot be held in a regular 
classroom. Good winter conditions are a must. 

LET'S THINK SNOW 



The Ski Team puts in a 
lot of time and effort to 
their season. Besides 
running stairs and doing wall 
sits within the vicinity of our 
physical plant, the Ski Team 
spends many nights practicing 
on skis at Berkshire East. 

The team began the season 
with crushed hopes of actual 
snow. When the snow finally 
fell (during Christmas vaca- 
tion), the skiers were psyched 
to qualify for the State Champi- 
onships. 

The Girls' Ski Team was led 
by Betsy Leritz, Kathy 
Bresette, and Courtney Ware. 
Michelle Derosier surprised ev- 
eryone with some of her times, 
while Kellie Raczka, Sarah 
Demosthenous, Sherry 
Decoteau, Lauren Troy, 
Allison Tipaldi, and Sarah 
McGahan also had good times. 



Betsy Leritz and Kathy 
Bresette were both seeded in 
Western Mass Championships. 

The Boys' Ski Team, led by 
Doug Paige, Jim Troy, Bill 
Fridlington, Ted Furst, and 
Jim Blondek, tried hard to 
overcome their troubles. They 
were backed up by Mike Reich, 
Eric Sagalyn, Chris Mosellen, 
Griff Noble, Greg Mascaro, 
Lane Wuerthele, Dave Selvia, 
and Todd Shumate. Doug 
Paige, Jim Troy, Ted Furst, Jim 
Blondek, and Mike Reich were 
all seeded for the Western Mass 
Competition. 

The Ski Team had a lot of 
spirit and put in a great amount 
of effort. New coaches 
Stephanie Quirk and Brian 
Howard pushed the team to do 
their best. Look for both teams 
next year at the State Champi- 
onships. 



GIRLS' AND BOYS' SKI TEAMS 93 




ENJOYING their last swim sea- 
son, Juliet Greene and Anne Berte have 
strong bonds in and out of the water. 
They have swum together for four 
years. 



AS she pulls herself through the water, 
Kristin Nelson helps Minnechaug win an- 
other one. 

JUNIOR Charity Manegre concen- 
trates on the dives that await her. 

GIRLS' ALL STAR TEAM. 

Heather Colclough, Kristin Nelson, Amy 
Mikuszewski, Anne-Marie Berte, Juliet 
Greene 



94 Gil LS' SWIMMING 




HRLS' SWIMMING. Angela 
runelle, Amy Mikuszewski, Juliet 
reen, Anne Berte, Kristin Nelson, Maria 
artori, Cathy Duffy. Kelly Gilligan, 
athy Mack, Heather Colclough, Anita 
alamone, Kristel Zimmerman, Angela 



Hebert. Coach Pat Cascio, Dena 
DeForge, Jamie Galvin, Coach Pat 
McDiarmid, Elizabeth Leahey, Breanne 
L'Heureux, Charity Manegre, Vanessa 
Fernandez. 



With skill, disciplined practice, and awesome team 
spirit, the girls' swim team was 

SOMETHING TO CHEER FOR 



rhe Girls' Swim Team 
continues their winning 
tradition with many 
2W, talented swimmers. Cap- 
lin Anne Berte and Julie 
reen, seniors, were top twelve 
Western Mass. contenders 
iroughout high school. They 
( elped lead the team in the 
print freestyle events. 
I Junior Heather Colclough 
mtinues to show her winning 
ays, as Kristel Zimmerman 
id Anita Salamone continue 
i improve and score points, 
lso a junior, diver Charity 
[anegre is ranked in the top six 
Western Mass. 
The sophomores were led by: 



Amy Kikuszewski, a versatile 
swimmer; Maria Sartori, a top 
sprint freestyler; Kristin Nel- 
son, a point-producing 
breastroker; Cathy Mack filled 
in capably as a distance 
freestyler; Angela Brunelle 
added to the points also; and 
Cathy Duffy has proved to be a 
strong flyer. Also adding talent 
to the team is diver Elizabeth 
Leahey. 

The girls won Western Mass 
in an upset over Amherst and 
placed second in the State meet. 
Amy Mikuszewski won the 500 
free in the Western Mass finals 
and in the State finals. 



WHILE AIRBORNE, freshman 
diver Breanne L'Heureux shows her con- 
sistency as a first year diver. 




GIRLS' SWIMMING 


Cathedral 


77-16 


Longmeadow 


61-32 


Amherst 


86-100 


Central 


68-21 


Agawam 


56-16 


South Hadley 


53-40 


ELongmeadow 


52-41 


Northampton 


53-37 


Cathedral 


133-53 


Longmeadow 


118-68 


Amherst 


44-49 





AS SHE CHCIRNS up the wa- 

ter, freshman Jamie Galvin swims the 
100 yard backstroke. 

OTHERWISE KNOWN AS 

"the motor," Amy Mikuszewski wins 
yet another race for Minnechaug. 



GIRLS' SWIMMING 95 



IT ISN'T EASY to dive in front of 
a large crowd, even though sophomore 
Andy Smith makes it look like it. Andy 
does an inward pike. 



After a string of early season wins, the boys were 

SWIMMING IN THE FAST LANE 



BOYS' SWIMMING 


Cathedral 


55-38 


East Longmeadow 


52-41 


Amherst 


107-91 


Northampton 


51-36 


Central 


56-37 


Agawam 


107-76 


South Hadley 


59-34 


Longmeadow 


48-45 


Cathedral 


104-79 


Longmeadow 


95-91 


Amherst 


64-29 






BOYS' SWIMMING. Front row: 
Rylan Grant, Captain Paul Mikuszewski, 
Rob Fortier, Phil King; Second row: 
Steve Piecuch, Jeff King, Evan Coppola, 
Andre Piscioneri, Rob McDiarmid; Back 



row: Coach Pat Cascio, Eric Brunelle, 
Matt Zaft-Weisman, Bryan McFarland, 
Scott Topor, Coach Pat McDiarmid, 
Andy Smith, Sean Overton 



The world stood up and 
took notice of the Boys' 
Swim Team at the start 
of the season. The Springfield 
Union-News interviewed last 
year's Western Mass champi- 
ons and asked them if they 
thought that this season would 
be as successful as last. 
Whether or not they would re- 
peat as champions, the swim- 
mers all agreed that it would be 
a great season. 

The team was led by captain 
Paul Mikuszewski, who 
quickly re-established his num- 
ber one position in the 200 and 
500 freestyles. He was also 
named athlete of the week early 
in the season. This reflects the 
great spirit and hopefulness the 
team had in looking forward to 
the coming season. 

Several other seniors helped 
the Falcons' great success. Ro- 
ger Brunelle, Rob Fortier, Phil 
King, and Rylan Grant were 
top scorers. In addition to 
swimming, Rylan also dove for 
the team. 

Juniors Drew Forcier and 
Scott Topor were also valuable 
point scorers. In addition, the 
team also received two new 
sophomores. Eric Brunelle 
joined Matt Zaft-Weisman in 
swimming, and Sean Overton 
joined Andy Smith in diving. 

The team was also aided by a 
large number of freshman new- 
comers. Bryan McFarland was 



one of the top scorers on t 
team. Other valuable membe 
were Evan Coppola, R< 
McDiarmid, Jeff King, And 
Piscioneri, and Steve Piecuc 
The new freshman had hi 
hopes of helping the team ha 
a winning season and proved 
be a great addition. 

Although the team only k 
three seniors last year, the tee. 
needed to take on new strai 
gies for the season. It wasi 
enough for the swim team to i 
fast. They had to be smart, ali 
Days of research and planni' 
went into the line-up of mai 
meets, and some swimmers s& 
rificed themselves to the 55 
free in order to help the teai 
It was this strategy that allow\ 
the team to have such a succee 
ful season. 

MRHS won Western MI 
for the second consecutive yet 
Paul Mikuszewski won fii 
place in the 200 and 500 f 
races there. The Boys' All S^ 
team consisted of Rob Forti 
Roger Brunelle, Pa: 
Mikuszewski, Rylan Grai 
and Bryan McFarland. 

But wherever they swami 
whatever they wore, the be 
swim team definitely learn 
the value of teamwork tl 
year, and their outstanding pr 
formance and attitude pro'' 
it. 




96 BOYS - SWIMMi. 





THE 200 YARD FREE isn't 

an easy race to swim. Freshman Jeff 
King struggles through the water as 
he tries to gain the lead. 



SENIOR SWIMMERSphil 

King, Roger Brunelle and captain 
Paul Mikuszewski pose together for a 
final group shot. 



BOYS' SWIMMING 97 





VARSITY HOCKEY. Front row: 
Jon Stachelek, Mike Donovan, Scott 
Smith, Tim Camerlin, Eric Dolaher. Sec- 
ond row: Brian Dolaher, Ryan Camerlin, 



Jason Carter, Jason Kertenis, Chris 
Wright, Coach Marty Kibbe. Back row: 
John Rigney, Kevin Hughes, Jon Albano, 
Jim Sullivan, Pat Moriarty, Chip Perkins. 



VARSITY HOCKEY 


Easthampton 


4-6 


Holyoke 


2-6 


Chicopee 


8-2 


WSpringfield 


8-9 


Amherst 


2-8 


Cathedral 


2-9 


Agawam 


4-8 


WSpringfield 


7-1 


Amherst 


1-5 


Westfield 


4-6 


WSpringfield 


0-7 


Agawam 


3-3 


Cathedral 


0-11 


Westfield 


1-0 


Agawam 


2-4 


Westfield 


5-8 


Amherst 


0-9 


Cathedral 


o-i : 



DEFENSEMAN Pat Moriarty 
stickhandles in the open ice to lead the 
break out against Chicopee. Pat was one 
of four freshmen to make the varsity 
hockey team. 

GQALTENDER Steve Bidus 
stares down the Chicopee offense and 
makes the save on the shot. Steve, new 
to Minnechaug, immediately contributed. 



JV HOCKEY 




Ludlow 


2-6 


Amherst 


1-6 


Ludlow 


1-6 


Cathedral 


0-6 


WSpringfield 


2-3 


Amherst 


0-5 


Ludlow 


0-6 


Cathedral 


2-6 


Amherst 


1-5 







HOCKEY 




COACH Marty Kibbe watches his 
team intently from the bench, looking to 
pick up any mistakes. Coach Kibbe, a 
veteran coach, was always supportive of 
his team. 




JV HOCKEY. Front row: Bill Brady, 
Ryan Cubin, Mike Edery, Ray Bernard, 
Kevin Tabb. Second row: Coach Jim 
Ziemba, Steve Mikolajczuk, Mike 



Merigian, Steve Jack, Scott Grzedowski, 
Chad Fidalgo, Tony Brunetti. Back row: 
Mike Roberts, Dave Hanks, Sean Foley, 
T.J. Courtney, Ray Royer. 




THE BEST WE CAN 



The best we can, that's all 
I ask," said Coach 
Kibbe. With the change 
of divisional teams and the loss 
of ten varsity lettermen, it 
would be a tough season. But as 
the team said last year, "We 
never say never." 

In the fall, it was obvious 
that hard work and determina- 
tion would be necessary for a 
good season with a tough fall 
season and 1 1 up-and-coming 
rookies added to the squad. 
Freshmen Ryan Camerlin and 
Eric Dolaher joined their 



brothers, returning seniors Tim 
Camerlin and Brian Dolaher. 
Other first year players in- 
cluded freshmen Chip Perkins 
and Pat Moriarty, sophomores 
Jason Kertenis, Jon Albano, 
Chris Wright, and senior Jon 
Stachelek. 

In the opener against 
Easthampton, the team com- 
peted against one of the best 
teams of the season. The team 
realized that it had a chance to 
place high. 

Veteran coach Marty Kibbe 
returned to the helm ably as- 



sisted by JV coach Jim Ziemba. 
Hours of practice and encour- 
agement helped the young team 
maintain an even keel. In goal, 
sophomores Steve Bidus and 
Scott Smith have showed prom- 
ise and dedication. The offense 
was provided by senior for- 
wards Mike Donovan, Brian 
Dolaher, and Jim Sullivan. Ju- 
nior Kevin Hughes and sopho- 
more John Pvigney rounded out 
forward lines. The defense was 
anchored by senior Tim 
Camerlin and junior Jason 
Carter. 




FORWARD Kevin Hughes winds up 
to start the attack as Chicopee defenders 
put on the pressure. Minnechaug won the 
game in a blowout for their first victory of 
the season. 



HOCKEY 99 







STRETCHED TO THE LIMIT 



pp he year began not without fuss 
■*• For an 89.99 was ruled a B + 
And there was yet another rule for the masses: 
The administration required five classes. 

r-p, he FALCON staff could work as a team 

Because the yearbook class fulfilled a dream 
Students doing poorly had a surprise in store 
Progress reports were more positive than before. 

^i ome things remained the same at the school 

^*^ Requirements such as English and pool 
There was homework to do at every turn 
Students found out they had much to learn. 

TAT eekends would come for a welcome relief 

But school time in between caused students much grief 
Students gave about all they could give it 
But there was no doubt they'd been STRETCHED TO THE LIMIT. 




100 ACADEMICS DIVIDER 




'rj anging on for dear life, 
Andy Smith partici- 
pates in Project Ad- 
'nture. This is a sophomore 
liysical education program 



that encourages students to 
engage in challenging activi- 
ties that might normally 
frighten them. 



ACADEMICS DIVIDER 101 



PRIMPING herself before 
Math class, Bridget Baron pre- 
pares for another school day. She 
sits waiting for class to begin but 
uses the extra few minutes to 
freshen up. 

LAB PARTNERS, Sara 
McCurry and Erin Vonflatern write 
up their lab reports for Mrs. Gor- 
don. Earth Science is a required 
course for most freshmen. 




MRS. BARTON'S D block 

class gets their books out while 
listening to directions. Ryan 
Camerlin and Brian Grondalski 
don't look very happy about it. 



102 AC OEMICS 




CAREFULLY COGNT- 

IMG lentil beans in Chemistry, 
Brendon Halloran tries to concen- 
trate. He shows how frustrating 
some labs can be in Mr. 
Sternberg's C block class. 



LISTENING to Mrs. 

Radwilowicz lecture, Kim Wyzik 
prepares to take notes. Having 
Chemistry last period of the day 
makes concentrating hard, but 
Kim shows that she can deal with 
it. 




AND EQUATIONS 

How are they important? 



Let's start with the 
obvious, all of us 
must complete at 
least two years of a science 
to graduate. Is anyone in- 
terested in Physics? If so, 
more power to you. But 
you'll have to take earth 
science, biology, and 
chemistry first. Earth sci- 
ence is the ever-popular 
study of geology with por- 
tions of astronomy and 
rock identification com- 
bined. Biology sends the 
participant reeling 
through the wide world of 
chromosomes, photosyn- 
thesis, and rat dissection 
lab. Chemistry is an as- 
sortment of atoms, ele- 
ments, and molecules. 
Physics teaches students 
to look at things from a 
more physical perspective. 
Math and science go 
hand in hand, students 
taking these courses will 
agree. Although many 



students may complain 
that these classes can be 
boring, it may not be too 
difficult to make them 
more interesting. Erin 
LeRay comments, "Sci- 
ence courses can be made 
more fun if teachers in- 
crease the number of ex- 
periments. It teaches stu- 
dents through hands on 
experience." Amanda 
Zepke agreed but sug- 
gested a way to improve 
math classes, "If teachers 
relate math to other sub- 
jects by using examples, I 
think students will be- 
come more interested and 
want to learn." 

Students may argue 
whether they will ever use 
the knowledge from their 
math or science classes 
but they will agree that in 
the meantime these two 
courses are important to 
take now. 



ACADEMICS 103 



TURN BACK the clock. During 
a history debate, junior Alan 
Poremba expresses his point 
through a colonial view. Ms. 
Brewer wants students to get into 
the part. 



LAUGHING AWAY before 
history begins, Eric Dolaher and 
John Lempart wait for their 
teacher to give them directions. 
John was a little camera shy. 



TEAMWORK is the main fo- 
cus in this activity. The peer coun- 
seling class participated in a 
weekend retreat at Camp Moses 
in Russell, Massachusetts. 




THE PEER counseling adviser is 
AnnMarie Zanfagna. Taking a 
break from the activities, she 
watches as the students go 
through training. 




PREPARING FOR yet an- 
other activity are Lisa Anderson, 
Jen Breton, and Pam Chase. The 
purpose of the retreat was to have 
fun while learning to trust each 
other at the same time. 

SHE'S GOT the whole world in 
her hands. Mrs. Connie Shea 
holds the globe up for her geogra- 
phy class to find Saudi Arabia and 
Kuwait. 



104 ACADEMICS 




STRONGLY making a 

point during a debate, is junior 
Mara Gaudette. She clearly dis- 
agrees with the other team's 
statement in A block. 




WHAT INCREDIBLE 
STRENGTH! Junior Becky 
Beacom lifts a desk high over her 
head during her A block Honors 
OS History class so she'll have a 
place to sit. 




YOUR MIND 

Is it all worth while? 



About three years 
ago Peer Coun- 
seling was started 
by AnnMarie Zanfagna 
and Diane Danthony. The 
first semester is devoted to 
getting to know yourself, 
learning how to express 
feelings, and working on 
assertiveness skills. Dur- 
ing September the group 
goes away for a weekend 
of training. All the skills 
they learn that weekend 
are based on trust. 

The second semester 
deals with stress manage- 
ment, and adolescent is- 
sues. It gives a student the 
background needed for 
peer counseling. Peer 
counseling is an interest- 
ing class that attracts a 
diverse group of people, 



and it also teaches the stu- 
dents wonderful commu- 
nication skills. 

Enter the door of K-13 
and Mr. Stephen 
Castonguay will welcome 
you to the world of psy- 
chology. The class is of- 
fered to seniors only. The 
atmosphere of the class is 
very laid back. The class 
deals with people and 
their experiences. It's a 
course about living and 
learning from one an- 
other. 

The class has a lasting 
impact on many students. 
Our exchange student, 
Jenny Arnoman "discov- 
ered" psychology here in 
the United States. She has 
worked with great zeal. 



ACADEMICS 105 



ART TAKES a lot of skill and a 
steady hand. Ms. Robinson's D- 
block art class is learning just 
what it takes to apply their skills 
to paper. 



CLARINETS, saxophones, 
drums, and trumpets are just a 
few of the instruments that help 
consist to the band. Heather 
Rothschild does her part by play- 
ing the clarinet. 





ALENTS GALORE 



IS IT CREATIVITY 

At Its Best? 



Both yearbook and 
art class require 
patience, skill, 
and creativity. Both in- 
clude the concept of put- 
ting ideas onto paper. 

"I was interested in 
yearbook, but never had 
the time after school to 
participate. The class al- 
lowed the opportunity to 
see what yearbook was all 
about," said Jen Little. 

Few students in the 
class had worked with lay- 
outs, picture-taking, cap- 
tion writing, and other 
yearbook techniques. 
Nikki Bluteau com- 
mented, "Working on the 
yearbook wasn't what I 
expected. I thought it was 
just a bunch of pictures 
with articles. Realizing it 

DURING D block, the different 
choruses join to sing together. 
Heather Brown, Nate Root, Ben 
Muldrew, Chris Hanrahan, and 
Chris Tarantino take their talent 
seriously. 



was a lot more work, I had 
more respect for the peo- 
ple who did it." 

Art in isn't just sketch- 
ing and painting. Students 
have created a number of 
different projects. Terri 
Pajak brought in an ordi- 
nary chair, and, using 
some paint, a zebra, and 
her imagination, turned it 
into a piece of art. Other 
students have created a 
variety of clay sculptures. 
Bridget Baron and Char- 
ity Manegre spent many 
hours constructing busts, 
and Charlie Brown and 
Stephanie Ziobro pro- 
duced a series of arms. 

Both art and yearbook 
bring out creativity at its 
best! 








106 ACADEMICS 




AS A MEANS OF self expres- 
sion, art can be very gratifying. 
Bridget Baron gazes at her paint- 
ing which is on the wall of the Art 
Gallery in E-8. 





YEARBOOK takes a lot of 
concentration and patience. Dur- 
ing her yearbook class, BonnieJo 
Hanson works on an article in 
order to complete the December 
deadline for the sophomore sec- 
tion. 

A MAJOR PROJECT for art 
classes was the construction of 
large scale Japanese Torii Gates. 
Closely following the directions of 
visiting artist, Susan Boss, 
Genevieve Dutil leams what to do 
as she cuts paper. Ms. Boss was 
here as an Artist-in-Resident be- 
cause art teacher Meg Robinson 
wrote a successful grant from the 
Cultural Education Collaborative. 



ACADEMICS 107 



MAKING SURE she knows ex- 
actly what to do Kristie Mitchell 
gets help from her classmate 
Derek Giordano. Project Adven- 
ture builds confidence in yourself 
as well as with others. 



THIS CAR has been an excite- 
ment for many Minnechaug stu- 
dents. Most of the students 
throughout their high school years 
have had the experience to be 
behind this wheel. 




PACING BACK AND FORTH 
with her racket, Sue Pierce waits for 
the serve. Many students took the 
opportunity to learn how to play bad- 
minton during the second term of this 
school year. 




HEADING OUT for his first 
driving lesson, Michael Wing gets 
behind the wheel. Mr. Barrett has 
had the opportunity to success- 
fully teach many students the 
rules of the road. 

GETTING READY to serve the 
ball, Kevin Moriarty shows off his 
racquetball talents. Racquetball 
can be a lot of fun, providing you 
don't mind wearing goggles. 




n t 



■J 



! 




// 



108 ACADEMICS 




NOT TO BE LATE to gym 
class, Ellen Sullivan hurries to get 
changed. Having only four min- 
utes to get changed can some- 
times be a hassle. 



7 




SITTING AND SUPERVIS- 
ING the juniors, Mrs. Polchlopek 
watches as the students play bad- 
minton. Badminton is just one of 
the sports she teaches. 




IMPORTANT LESSONS; 

What are they? 



P.E. is a subject that 
every student at 
Minnechaug must 
take. Freshman pool is a joy 
for girls. Shiloh Napolitan 
commented that she wished 
they gave more time to get 
ready. When lifesaving 
comes around, sophomores 
are more prepared. 

Project adventure is fun if 
you're not afraid of heights. 
Karen McCarthy said, "It 
was scary doing high stuff 
and looking down at every- 
one." Junior year brings a 
big change. "I enjoy 



PARTICIPATING in his 

project adventure class, Heath 
Bleau attempts to walk "the log." 
Climbing from the tree to the log 
is the hardest and scariest part. 



gym more because I 
have control over what 
class I have to take, and 
I only have to take it 
twice a week," said 
Sara Taylor. 

Juniors are also in- 
troduced to a sex edu- 
cation class. "I guess 
sex education should be 
taught in school," said 
junior, Jeff Palone, "It 
has to do with us. If 
people are having sex, 
they have to learn it 
somehow." 

Although students 
are required to take 
four years of physical 
education to graduate, 
most of them leave with 
more knowledge and 
experience. 



ACADEMICS 109 



TAKING A BREAK from their 
D-block shorthand class to pose 
for a picture are Jodi Sheperd, 
Alicia Gutride, Heather Bleau, 
Kay-Kay Sutton, Stephanie 
Thiffault, and Michelle Watts. 




WORKING HARD to com- 
plete her assignment, junior Jodi 
Sheperd demonstrates her typing 
skills. Computer classes are great 
for teaching students skills that 
can be used in future careers. 

WHILE WORKING together 
with Mrs. Diane Rooney, Heather 
Bleau, finds the time to smile for 
the camera. The business courses 
offered at Minnechaug teach stu- 
dents many useful skills. 






1 10 ACADEMICS 





NGLISH 



AND MORE; 

How much is there to learn? 



Most people think 
having to type a 
book report, or a 
term paper is horrifying, 
and just another problem 
added to the assignment. 
Taking a typing, word 
processing, keyboarding, 
or computer class would 
help solve these extra 
problems. No matter 
whether half year or a full 
year of typing is taken, the 
basics of typing are 
learned. 

In the process of typing, 
grammar and punctuation 
are dealt with, which is a 
good review for English 
class. As the year pro- 
ceeds, speed and accuracy 
of typing skills improve 
dramatically. Soon, typ- 
ing reports and other as- 




signments is not a prob- 
lem anymore because of 
faster typing skills. Learn- 
ing to type and under- 
standing the difficulties of 
various computers will 
most likely help sometime 
in the near future, 
whether it be in college, or 
in a future career. 

Once one learns to type, 
he can easily work a com- 
puter. Once he knows how 
to run a computer, he can 
take a business course. 
Typing helps one write 
letters, reports, etc. 
Knowing how to run a 
computer makes life easier 
in the business world. 
Business courses prepare 
students for the "outside 
world." 

IN COMPUTER CLASS Mrs. 
Diane Jeserski looks over Jennifer 
Harrington's work before it is 
handed in to be graded. This class 
has become much more popular 
over the past few years. 



SITTING in her economics 
class Andrea David concentrates 
on her work. She rushes so she 
doesn't have any homework that 
night. 



ACADEMICS 1 1 1 



wr. 



MR. KIBBE'S electronics 
class is a class that requires a 
great deal of logic and skill. 
Brian Smith will surely agree 
that it takes a lot of know how. 



ENJOYING their snack, 
the E-Block Child Study class 
eats their Jello Jigglers. Kim- 
berly Venne and Sage Chaffee 
sit back and relax. 





LEARNING to keep their 
hands clean, the daycare chil- 
dren line up for their turn at the 
sink. Good hygene is only one 
of the things the children are 
taught. 




M 1 



112 ACADEMICS 







IN E-Block Home Economics 
class, Rob Langdon places his 
home made pie in the oven. 
Home Economics takes a lot of 
work and Rob displays the re- 
sult of his craftsmanship. 




DILIGENTLY working on 
her project, Jen Ferrindino 
tries to finish it during elec- 
tronics class. Jen is proof that 
course isn't just for guys. 





FUN AND GAMES 

So What Exactly Is It? 



The Child Develop- 
ment N ursery 
School is part of 
the Home Economics 
program. The school pro- 
vides an opportunity for 
high school students en- 
rolled in a child develop- 
ment course to have prac- 
tical experience with 
young children. Under 
the guidance of the home 
economics teacher, the 
students will gradually 
assume responsibility for 
planning and directing 
activities with the chil- 
dren. 

The nursery school 
class consists of twelve 
children, half from 
Hampden and the other 
half from Wilbraham. 
This year there are two 



groups of nursery school 
children. The four and 
five year olds meet on 
Tuesday through Thurs- 
day and the three and 
four year olds meet on 
Monday and Friday. 

The students taking 
this course have the re- 
sponsibility to plan and 
structure the activities 
which help prepare the 
children for upcoming 
nursery school or their 
kindergarten year. This 
class is not only a great 
program for the children, 
but it is a learning exper- 
ience for all students who 
take it. Many students 
who study child develop- 
ment and take part in the 
nursery school continue 
their study. 



ACADEMIC 113 



AP ENGLISH looks great for 
college, but it's not easy. Jon 
Kerbel and Kim Ingram will 
agree that the many books 
read and essays written are 
very time consuming. 




DOING WELL on a test re- 
quires a lot of concentration. 
Courtney Ware takes the pres- 
sure in stride while taking a 
Spanish test. Courtney is a stu- 
dent of Spanish 4. 

STANDING in front of his Eng- 
lish class, Rob Thorpe acts out 
a part in King Lear. Oral inter- 
pretation is just one aspect of 
E-Block Honors English. 



114 ACADCM1CS 




AND MORE 

How Much Is There To Learn? 




Foreign languages 
are an important 
part of our educa- 
tion. America is a coun- 
try whose streets are 
made of gold. The fact 
that thousands of immi- 
grants swarm here per 
year makes America one 
of the, if not the most, 
multilingual countries in 
the world. 

If you want to go any- 
where in life, communi- 
cation is a major help. 
Knowing a foreign lan- 
guage allows you to com- 
municate with people of a 
different nationality. A 
foreign language looks 
great on college entrance 
forms, job resumes and 
can be a tremendous help 




in many business transac- 
tions. The bottom line is 
this: knowing a foreign 
language is incredibly im- 
portant in today's world. 

English, a major 
course, is required for all 
four years of high school. 
Grammar, vocabulary, 
essays, literature are the 
fun parts of English. But 
seriously, English is the 
language we speak. 
Shouldn't we speak it cor- 
rectly, intelligently? 

Language is something 
frequently taken for 
granted. Only after we 
graduate do we realize 
that we should have stri- 
ven for more proficiency 
while it was easy for us in 
our high school classes. 



WHERE can you find a new 
batch of boppers each year? 
Mr. Musselman's freshman 
English class. Eric Baron 
works in freshman English. 



BEFORE class begins, Kim 
Forrant takes a short rest. She 
prepares herself for another in 
depth Latin discussion. 



ACADEMICS 115 



AS WE ALL KNOW, lunch is 
the most relaxing time of the 
day. Bryan Cristofori enjoys a 
discussion with his friend Jon 
Kerbel during lunch. 



WITH ONLY one block left 
to study, the pressure is really 
on. Griff Noble is cramming for 
a G-Block Chemistry test dur- 
ing his study period. 





REE TIME 



WHEN WE HAVE 
SO LITTLE 

What Should We Do? 



The hall is a place 
where friends get 
together before 
homeroom or to enjoy be- 
tween class chats with 
passerbys. The hall is the 
perfect hangout for those 
who get to school early, 
especially for those who 
arrive before their home- 
room teacher. Every 
place one looks, different 
groups are crowded to- 
gether sharing gossip. 

The only times one can 
find the hallways bare is 
at lunch. Lunch! Every- 
one enjoys lunch. Each 
day it begins with a race 
to see who can be the first 
in line. The message 
board shows the daily 
menu along with brief 
messages. 

Commenting on the 
message board, an addi- 
tion to the cafeteria since 
the spring of 1990, Lynn 
Gil said, "I think it's 
helpful because it pro- 



vides information on the 
events of the day." Disa- 
greeing, Pete Rogers 
said, "First of all, it was a 
waste of money. I think it 
could have been used for 
more important things. 
The only thing I use it for 
is to find out the day's 
lunch." 

And, of course, there 
are always those who 
won't eat school lunch, 
but prefer to bring their 
own. 

Study hall can be a life 
saver for the busiest of 
students. Or i.t can be the 
most boring forty-five 
minutes of one's life. Kel- 
lie Raczka commented, 
"I just think that people 
should be able to talk and 
be social. It would be nice 
to have a separate area 
for those that need to 
study." Either way, study 
hall is a break from the 
regular academic classes. 




16 ACADHf 




WHAT A MESS! Becky Bea- 
com tries to find the book she 
needs for her next class with- 
out being late. As we all know, 
it's not always easy. 




STUDIES AREN'T AL 
WAYS a waste of time, as ev- 
eryone thinks. Dean Rosenthal 
takes advantage of his time 
and does his homework for his 
next class. 



TRYING SOMETHING for 
the first time, Kerri Dowling 
makes a face while eating the 
school lunch. Amused, Lynne 
McGranahan along with oth- 
ers, sit and watch. 



WW*i 




SOMETIMES Lunch is 

just a time to take a break. 
Jody Kasten and Liz Ross re- 
lax on the bench outside Cafe- 
teria 1 and enjoy each other's 
company. 






<3 



ACADEMICS 117 



TIGHT TIES 



H 



igh school is more than an educational endeavor 
For it is where friendships will be joined forever 
Friendship is most important, without a doubt 
Everyone is happier with friends than without. 



T 



here are good times and bad times through the years 



Times of laughter and times of tears 
Homework, tests, and a research report 
Friends were always there to lend support. 



w 



ith enrollment decreasing the student body was small 
But that didn't keep them from standing tall 
Those who had thought otherwise had a surprise in store 
For students were even more spirited than before. 



^-«j o far the trip through this book has been fun 
^"^ Seeing Minnechaug in the year 1990-91 

Remembering the "hellos" and the "good-byes" 

Through it all keeping TIGHT TIES. 




118 PEOPLE DIVIDER 




*ase Call for Hel 



Matt Nelson makes a 
plea for assistance on 
the Massachusetts 
Turnpike. Matt, traveling to 
the James Taylor concert at 
Tanglewood with Andrea 
Chechile and Amy Giantris, 
was in dire straits because his 
car broke down. 



PEOPLE DIVIDER 119 



SENIOR 
SAYS 



W hat is the wildest thing you've 
ever done? 

"I went to the mall with a group 
of friends and took a poll of how 
many single guys believed in pre- 
marital sex." 



Stacy Jacobs 

"Nothing, I'm a perfect student." 

Scott Hapgood 

"Sat on my friend's sunroof while 
going down the highway." 

Stacey Kurpaska 




Describe your most memorable 
moment at Minnechaug. 

"Freshman year when I got lost 
and stayed in the bathroom for 
one whole block." 

April Isham 

"The day I made the honor roll." 

Chad Brown 

"The food fight in second 
lunch." 

Jim Anderson 



120 SENIOB 



STEPPING UP 



On May 23, the 
Class of 1991 of- 
ficially "stepped 
up." The time had finally 
come when we would be 
the oldest members of 
Minnechaug. To celebrate 
the day, the class met in 
Cafeteria 3 and feasted on 
an array of doughnuts, 
muffins, and juice. While 
the students ate, they lis- 
tened to speeches given by 
the Class of 1991 officers. 
President Brian Borsari 
was given some words of 
advice from Class of 1990 
President Bryce Whiting. 
Vice President Alexis 
Heede delivered an enthu- 



siastic speech, to rally the 
spirits of the members of 
the class. Class advisor, 
Mr. Gary Petzold, also 
spoke to the students and 
gave them an overview of 
what was to come. 

It was decided that 
there would not be a Sen- 
ior Kick-Off Dance, in or- 
der to save more money 
for prom activities. 

May 23 was a day in 
which the Class of 1991 
could be recognized. It 
was also a chance for the 
class to join together to 
make decisions, show 
their spirit, and simply 
have some fun! 




SMILING FOR THE CAMEu 
during lunch block are Lft 
Tienken and Jen Harrington 1 1 
will be their last year of eating 
the Minnechaug cafeterias. 



■ 




Denise Allard 
James Anderson 
Adam Apple 
Jenny Arnoman 
Candace Arslanian 
Ascolillo, Emily Ascolillo 



Omar Asmar 
Lee Atcheson 
Deanna Bailey 
Keith Bailey 
Amy Barber 
Xenophan Beake 



Steven Belden 
Eric Belliveau 
Anne Berte 
Kristopher Bertelli 
Nancy Bigos 
Brian Bishop 





TAKING TIME OC1T, Brian 
stops to chat with his mother, 
Judy Borsari, a guidance coun- 
selor. 

WHILE LAUGHING at the audi- 
ence's remarks, Roger Brunelle 
tries to get his point across. 



SENIORS 121 



AS A JUNIOR, Roger Brunelle disguised him- 
self as a Salem witch. He was preparing to 
participate in a trial. 




He's Got 



LEGS 



^1 







)R, Roger Brunelle is dressed to 
: ; es apparel. He claims that he 
iginality". 



122 SENIORS 



REUNIONED? 



It was a lovely evening 
at the Student Gov- 
ernment Reunion 
held on June 4, 2001. Ev- 
eryone was having a great 
time dancing and remi- 
niscing about the exploits 
of their days in 
Minnechaug. The whole 
affair was being held in 
the courtyard, rated "The 
Best Looking Courtyard 
in the Nation" by Better 
Homes and Gardens. Mr. 
Gary Petzold had been 
very pleased with the arti- 
cle, and was heard to ex- 
claim several times, "See, 
I told Borsari it was the 
right decision to chainsaw 
those huge bushes near 



the art room!" 

Halfway through the 
evening, Mr. Petzold took 
the disc jockey's micro- 
phone and proudly an- 
nounced that Student 
Government was still go- 
ing strong. It still held the 
annual Homecoming and 
Semi-Formal dances, but 
had added three new ac- 
tivities: Environmental 
Day, The Save the Ozone 
Layer Dance (at which no 
one wore any hairspray), 
and a Land Fill Conserva- 
tion Breakfast. These were 
extremely popular and 
successful, and helped the 
Wilbraham and Hampden 
pollution situation. After 



announcing these activi- 
ties, Mr. Petzold let the 
disc jockey get back to 
work and nobbled off the 
stage. The rest of the eve- 
ning was enjoyable, not to 
mention out of control. 

As all the ex-students 
left to go back to their 
prosperous lives, they 
took pride at having been 
part of the Minnechaug 
Student Government. 
They had the satisfaction 
of knowing that it had 
changed with the times 
and was continuing to do 
good work for the school 
and community. 






BADMINTON anyone? 

Seniors Monica Maltby and Tim 
Camerlin stop to take a picture 
after a tiresome game of badmin- 
ton. 

STOPPING in the hallway are 
seniors Bryan Oglesby, Deanna 
Minnon, Matt Nelson, and Kevin 
Moriarty. 




James Blondek 
Nicole Bolek 
Brian Borsari 
Michael Briotta 
Chad Brown 
Charles Brown 



Heather Brown 
Roger Brunelle 
Kevin Burger 
Melissa Burk 
Bradley Burnett 
Tim Camerlin 



Kristen Campbell 
Sean Campbell 
Jennifer Candage 
Jason Carr 
Ronald Carr 
Diama Cerasa 



SENIORS 123 



Molly Cesan 

Patricia Charles 

Andrea Chechile 

Elizabeth Childs 

Cathleen Collier 

Colleen Coupal 



Scott Croteau 

Steven Croteau 

Brendan Daly 

Tara Daly 

Christopher Daniele 

Sarah Demosthenous 



Ralph Dill 

Norma Dinoia 

Brian Dolaher 

Michael Donovan 

Jeremy Draper 

Erica Dutil 





V|| I ■ 




DAZED AND CONFUSED, 
Jen Lucarelle shows the pressures 
of being a senior during senior 

study. 

STUDYING in the Media Cen- 
ter are Dan Skala and Amber 
Quist both of whom take advan- 
tage of the library during their free 
blocks. 









GRADUATION TIME 



^SEARCHING for model 

ngress, NanHee McMinn 
:nds some free time in the li- 
bty. 



When does a stu- 
dent actually 
consider him- 
self graduated? Is it 
when he takes his last 
final exam in June? Or is 
it when he receives his last 
official Minnechaug re- 
port card? Has a student 
finally graduated when he 
has walked across the 
stage and received his di- 
ploma? 

Alexis Heede feels that 
a student has graduated 
when he has a diploma in 



his hand with his name 
written on it. "A diploma 
is concrete evidence that a 
student has graduated." 

Kerry Manning feels 
that once a student has 
had his last day of classes, 
he has finished high 
school. "Finishing your fi- 
nals is like an ending to 
your high school career." 

No matter how one 
feels, graduating is a very 
important time in a stu- 
dent's life. 



SENIOR 
SAYS 



"High school is an interesting pe- 
riod. Everyone complains about it 
at the time, but they also know that 
in the future they'll long to return to 
their high school lifestyle. I mean, 
how tough can life be when your 
greatest worry is whether Mr. 
Scharl is going to give you a deten- 
tion for talking in the library?" 

-Brian Borsari 

"The edge is determined by those 
who go a step beyond." 

-Rylan Grant 

"If no one is there to hear Alexis 

talk, does she still make a sound?" 

-Sean Campbell 

"Zah, the real force behind phys- 
ics." 

-D-Block Physics class 

"I'd really like to do a 13th year." 
-Monica Maltby 

"What did you say?" 

-Rachel Morton 

"What is physics like? In Mr. 
Kenney's words of wisdom, 'No 
brag, just fact.' Physics is great. 
Between his 'Arnold' pictures, and 
his 'Physics of toys,' the whole class 
goes wild, including Mr. Kenney. If 
you go into physics, make sure 
you're mathematically inclined. 
There is a lot of math and it can be 
confusing. Physics is probably my 
most favorite class, and a "psycho" 
teacher helps, too." 

-Scott McFarland 



SENIORS 125 




IT'S A BIRD, it's a plane, it's 
Dan Truesdale. Dan identifies 
himself after a project. 

WHO'S THAT CHICK? It's 
Dan Truesdale waving hello to Mr. 
Tipaldi's English class. 




Michael Edery 

Erica Ellis 

Kristen Falzone 

John Farrell 

Joao Fernandes 

Tania Fernandez 



Adam Field 

Heather Fitt 

Keely Fitzgerald 

Sean Foley 

Robert Fortier 

Misty Foss 



Rejinald Fiveman 

William Fridlington 

Edward Furst 

Catherine Gagnon 

Jill Gagnon 

James Galleher 




■ 



A DAY IN THE LIFE 



John Doe begins his 
day at 6:30 am 
when his radio 
blasts into his ear. He 
stumbles to the bathroom 
and gets ready for school. 
At 7:15, he emerges from 
the bathroom a well- 
dressed student. 

John trudges through 
his first four classes. By 
now, he knows whether it 
is going to be a good day. 
Since all four of his teach- 
ers have assigned a lot of 
homework, it is going to 
be a bad day. 

Lunch provides a 
needed break from the 
burdens of schoolwork. 



John sits at a table with 
some of his friends. The 
talk is the basic high 
school fare: who did what 
last weekend, who's going 
out with whom, etc. 
Lunch ends and John and 
his friends leave. 

John now goes to his 
last three classes. By now, 
he is tired and wants to go 
home. He loses a game of 
badminton which doesn't 
brighten his day much. In 
fact, it puts him in a bad 
mood. He drifts through 
his classes, answering all 
questions with a distant 
"Huh?" 

Finally, the day ends 



and John gets home. As 
soon as he eats a snack 
and watches television, he 
starts calling people to see 
what's going on. By the 
time he finally sits down 
to do his homework, it is 
10:30 pm (there was a 
great movie on Channel 
8). John works for a while, 
and then decides that he 
can do the rest in senior 
study (forgetting that it is 
his last class). He goes to 
sleep at 11:00, but listens 
to the radio for at least 
forty five minutes. 

The life of a high school 
senior. 




SENIOR 
SAYS 



1M/ . hat is the dumbest thing 

W you've seen a freshmen 
do? 

"I've seen some of them run from 
class to class carrying these bags of 
books." 

-Rob Fortier 

"It must have been when a fresh- 
men was crying in the middle of 
K-hall because he didn't get the 
highest grade on a test." 

-Treena Makuch 

"The dumbest thing I've seen a 
freshmen do was get stuffed into a 
trash can." 

-Ted Furst 



¥ f you could add any senior 
1 privilege, what would it be? 

"I think students should be able to 
use the faculty parking lot." 

-Cathy Gagnon 

"Not getting in trouble for any 
tardies; not counting them." 

-Stephanie Hupfer 



"Open campus." 



-Shawn Blair 



SENIORS 127 



=tt-; _ ~lzhz .-, 1MM ; 



SENIOR 
SAYS 

1M/ . hat is the strangest thing 

W you've seen in some- 
one's locker? 

"Copies of old yearbooks." 

Scott McFarland 

"Although I haven't yet seen one 
in a locker, I wish I would. I'd 
love to find a battery for my car 
in someone's locker so that I 
could make it home on those 
cold, late basketball nights." 

Sara Taylor 

"The strangest thing I've seen in 
someone's locker is books." 

Mm Sullivan 



11/. What do you think the 
W future holds for you? 



"College and to get my masters 
degree in Elementary Educa- 
tion." 

Anne Berte 

"An obscene amount of money." 

Sara Taylor 

"Becoming a golf pro." 

Brian Bishop 



128 SENIORS 




THE FINAL COUNTDOWN 



We've waited 18 
years for this 
year. From 
September to December, 
it is utter chaos. There are 
college applications, inter- 
views and tours, senior 
thesis, physics, a job, 
sports, plus everything 
else that one does in an 
average week. 

After January the fun 
begins. Soon everyone 
knows what college he is 
attending and the next 
four years are decided. 

In May there the senior 
banquet is held at High 

LCJINCHTIME conversation is 
enjoyed by Karen Truitt and Jill 
Turcotte. 



Meadows. There are grad- 
uation speaker tryouts 
and cap and gown checks. 
By the end of May, classes 
are over and only finals 
are left. 

With June comes the 
long awaited night of the 
Senior Prom, and gradua- 
tion excercises at Sym- 



phony Hall. On June 
the big night has arriv 
Graduation. No one 
wait to graduate, butt 
the back of everyon 
head lies a bit of apj| 
hension about leaving: 
safety of his home. 





Peter Galvin 
Gauthier, Lisa 
Gawivn, Brian 
Steven Gralenski 
Rylan Grant 
Juliet Greene 



Alicia Gutride 
Christopher Hanrahan 
Scott Hapgood 
Jennifer Harrington 
Thomas Hebert 
Alexis Heede 



Steven Hertz 
Clay Holdsworth 
Amanda Howells 
Sarah Hsaio 
Kelli Hudson 
Stephanie Hupfer 





KEEPING to the beat of the 
music are dancing partners Erica 
Whittle and Mr. Dave Bennett. 

AWAITING tryouts for Dis- 
trict, Rob Fortier and Heather 
Brown practice. 



SENIOR 
SfiYS 

S ENIOR CLASS OF 1991 



C arly morning breakfasts at 



Abdow's 



N 



o more teachers, no more 
books! 



i ntimidating to freshmen 



O 



verworked, overstressed, 
over high school 



R eunited in 2001 



| nvasion of the college 
* applications 



|| imes to remember 



am invincible! 



5 o long, Minnechaug! 




SLICK Sean Campbell slides 
into the drivers seat. 



130 SENIORS 



WHAT'S IN A NICKNAME? EVERYTHING! 



Jennifer. Heather. 
Brian. Names 
don't come much 
plainer than these. A nick- 
name can add some spark. 
Usually people do not 
make up their own nick- 
names. They must pa- 
tiently wait for someone 
to give them one. 

Rob Fortier got his 
nickname from the swim 
team. "They gave me the 
name 'Lamb Chop' fresh- 
man year," he says, "but 
over the years, its been 
shortened to 'Chopper.'" 
Some people get their 
names by accident. Take, 
for an example, Nancy 
Bigos or Erica Dutil. Mrs. 



Radwilowicz called 
Nancy "Judy" by mistake 
one day, and its been her 
nickname ever since. Er- 
ica Dutil's nickname came 
from the mispronuncia- 
tion of her last name. "My 
dad couldn't pronounce 
'Dutil'," explained Tara 
Daly, "He said 'Doodle' 
by mistake, so we started 
calling her (Erica) that." 

Similarly, Jennifer 
Lucarrelle, ("Lukie"), 
Scott Hapgood, ("Haps"), 
and Jim Sullivan, 
("Sully"), acquired their 
nicknames from their last 
names. 

Some people are given 
nicknames because of 



their physical characteris 
tics. Chad Brown's nick 
name, "Hopper," come: 
from his long legs 
Heather Brown was givet 
her nickname because o ■:' 
her red hair. "I like hav 
ing a nickname," shttj 
claims, "because there am 
simply too many 'Heath 
ers' in this school and hav 
ing a name like 'Red' dis 
tinguishes me from thd 
rest of the bunch." Both 
Brian Borsari and Brian 
Bishop, (Bo and Boo, re< 
spectively), use their nick-, 
names to distinguish 
themselves from thtt 
crowd. 






ENJOYING post show ap- 
plause are Katie Lewis and Diama 
Cerasa. Diama directed Best Play 
of the Evening, Present Tense. 

TOUGH GUYS always wear 
shades. Scott Hapgood and Chad 
Brown demonstrate this on Hal- 
loween. 




Kurt Ingram 
April Isham 
Stacy Jacobs 
Philip King 
Samantha Kober 
Brett Koppelmann 



Mary Kotomski 
David Kozub 
Dale Kritzky 
Stacey Kurpaska 
Johanna LaCamera 
Michelle Laferriere 



Michael Landry 
Lisa Leccese 
Katherine Lewis 
Lisa Lewis 
Maribeth Liberty 
Jennifer Lucarelle 



Paul Lussier 

Melissa Lutrell 

Jen Lynch 

Kathleen Lynch 

Kiina Maharme 

Treena Makuch 



Monica Maltby 

Kerry Manning 

Jennifer Markham 

Jennifer McCarthy 

Scott McFarland 

Sarah McGahan 



Gerald McMahon 

Nanhee McMinn 

Steven Meisner 

Darren Melcher 

Paul Mikuszewski 

Deanna Minnan 





BEFORE SPRINTING to the 
lunch line, Sarah Demosthenous 
and Jen Lynch stop for a pose in 
H-hall. 

THE FLASH of a camera 
interupts Stephanie Hupfer and 
Jennifer Harrington as they work. 




TZn 




THROUGH THE YEARS . . . 



Freshman year we 
enter high school 
with our nerves on 
edge. Will my locker 
open? Will I ever find G- 
hall? Most importantly, 
will I fit in? 

By sophomore year, the 
school isn't so intimidat- 
ing. Walking through the 
halls is no longer such a 
scary experience, and now 
we can watch the new 
freshmen suffer the way 
we did. 

Junior year. Finally, 
we're upperclassmen! We 
feel confident and relaxed, 
and begin to settle in for 
our last two years of high 



school. College is on our 
minds; we realize these 
grades on our report cards 
really do matter. 

Entering Minnechaug 
the first day of our senior 
year is an exhilarating 
feeling. It's rather difficult 
to believe this will be our 
last year in these halls, 
these classrooms, and 
with these teachers we 
have grown so accus- 
tomed to. No more long 
hikes from hall to hall, 
and no more teachers to 
stop us for passes in the 
halls. 

Our schedules are hec- 
tic. We try to juggle clas- 



ses, a job, college applica- 
tions, and still try to have 
a social life. Yet, we 
wouldn't trade this year 
with any other. 

Amy Barber, Lisa 
Lewis, and Kelli Hudson 
have all put in their fair 
share of hours working at 
the Gap. One can also 
spot Bill Fridlington a few 
stores down at Sackett's. 
Pam Zajac has certainly 
put her time in working 
hard at Stop and Shop. 

Senior year means re- 
ceiving more privileges, 
gaining more respect, and 
experiencing the best time 
of our lives! 



SENIOR 
SRYS 



WHAT'S GOOD, 

WHAT'S BETTER, 

WHAT'S BEST 



*Results of Student 
Responses 



Radio Station: 102.1 FM 

Female Singer: Paula Abdul 

Male Singer: Billy Joel 

Rock Group: Motely Crue 

Song: Unchained Melody 

Music Video: Cradle of Love 

T.V Show: Cheers 

Movie: Pretty Woman 

Soap Opera: Days of Our Lives 

Actress: Julia Roberts 

Actor: Mel Gibson 

Store: Gap 

Restaurant: Pizzeria Uno 

Food: Pizza 

Drink: Diet Coke 

Magazine: Rolling Stone 

Comic Strip: Calvin and Hobbs 

Car: Lamborghini Countach 

Teacher: Mr. Hanscom 

Subject: History 

Word: Sweet 




DURING a New Year's Eve party, Andrea 
Chechile and Dave Kozub enjoy each other's com- 
pany. 



SENIORS 133 




SANTA LUCIA acquired a new 
significance for the Thibodeau 
family when Jenny prepared saf- 
fron rolls, ginger bisquits and cof- 
fee on December 13. Santa Lucia 
is a traditional Christmas celebra- 
tion. 

WORKING on yearbook lay- 
outs, Jenny indulges herself in a 
course unknown in Sweden. 



ssfSS 



Robin Miodowski 

Kevin Moriarty 

Rachel Morton 

Vail Mosier 

Karrie Murphy 

Erik Nelson 



Matthew Nelson 

Troy Norcross 

Gregory Nowakowski 

William O'Connell 

Bryan Oglesby 

Robert Pafumi 



Luke Parker 

Rinku Patel 

Brigitte Pelouze 

Nicole Pepin 
Lori-Ann Perotti 

Susan Pierce 




HEJ MINNECHAUG 



Hi! My name is 
Jenny Arnoman. 
I was born on 
August 17, 1973, in Stock- 
holm, Sweden. Two years 
ago I decided that I 
wanted to become an ex- 
change student for a year 
in America. 

I have been here for 
almost five months now 
and I am really enjoying 
my stay. I'm staying with 
a wonderful family. I was 
very confused with 
Minnechaug in the begin- 
ning, but now everything 
is just fine. 

There are so many 



things that are different 
from my school in Swe- 
den. In Sweden our 
schooldays are longer. We 
have to take many more 
classes. We have much 
more freedom, (which can 
be both good and bad . . . ) 

The food is different. 
We eat much more fish 
and vegetables at home in 
Sweden. 

You have to be eighteen 
to get your driver's li- 
cence, and it would cost 
you around $1500- $2000. 
Here you can get it when 
you are sixteen. That is 
much better! 



I really like Wilbraham. 
I'm so glad I came here. I 
have made lots of friends. 
I go to dancing and to 
youth-fellowship in my 
spare time. 

I had a fun part in one 
of the school plays a few 
weeks before Christmas, 
and I was on the cross- 
country team in the begin- 
ning of the school year. 

Finally, I just want to 
thank EVERYBODY for 
making this year wonder- 
ful for me! 

I love America and I 
will definitely come back! 




SENIOR SAYS 



Seniors were not meant to 
have . . . 

ALL WORK 




TAKING ADVANTAGE of senior study, Tara 
Reavy does some homework in the library. 



AND NO PLAY! 




DURING a trip to the circus, Mary Wallace and 
Nancy Bigos take a ride on an elephant. 



SENIORS 135 



SENIOR SRYS 



"If you have built your 
castles in the air; if your 
work need not be lost; 
that is where they 
should be; now put the 
foundations under 
them." -Henry David 
Thoreau 




FOLLOWING the Persian 
Gulf news, Karen Truitt and 
Melissa Luttrull watches CNN as 
dreams of peace are destroyed. 





ADVENTURES IN J7 



STRUGGLING with a ban- 
ner for PAVAS, Keely Fitzgerald 
wonders whether participating in 
clubs is a trick or a treat. 



The mystique of sen- 
ior study. No one 
really appreciates 
or disdains it until one has 
experienced it. Of course, 
many refuges are avail- 
able. 

There is the "quiet 
room," where the decibel 
level is actually tolerable 
and homework that re- 
quires little thought can 
be completed. 

The "talking room" de- 
fies all of the noise control 
laws in the town of 
Wilbraham. There is no 
feasible way to concen- 
trate on anything other 
than gum-flapping in this 



room. 

A third option is the 
media center. At the be- 
ginning of each study hall 
there is a mass exodus to 
the media center. A quick 
flash of an I.D. ensures a 
senior of a block at the 
library. The chairs are 
comfortable, the floor is 
carpeted, and there are 
underclassmen to torture. 
For many seniors, the me- 
dia center is their most 
attractive option. 

Then there is always the 
guidance department, al- 
ways cordial to seniors, 
rolling out the proverbial 
red carpet for them. 




THIS COSTUME is the 
tional dress that girls wear in i 
dia. On Halloween, Rinku Pfi 
wore this dress, which is nr 
common in Crujrat, India. Indi|« 
girls wear this particular dress l 
til they are married. After wedlo 
they wear another dress called 
"saree." Unlike American te 
agers, they rarely wear jeans. 



136 SENIOR 




Kelly Pincince 
Amber Quist 
Tar a Reavey 
Lori Ritchter 
Jason Robinson 
Brendan Rohan 



Nathanial Root 
Douglas Rose 
Annette Ross 
Jennifer Ross 
Elizabeth Ross 
Heather Rothschild 



Robert Royer 
David Rugger i 
Eric Schmidt 
Stephen Schmuck 
Ryan Scott 
Jennifer Shaw 




VEGGING OUT in senior 
study, Tom Walling sits, waiting 
for the bell to ring. 

CATCHING UP on the gossip 
are Erica Dutil, Kara Welch and 
Courtney Ware. 



1. 

2. 

3. 
4. 



SENIOR 
SRYS 



TOP FIVE 
COLLEGE 
CHOICES 



* Results 

of 

Student 

Responses 



WNEC 

STCC 

Harvard 

UMASS 

UCONN 

Providence College 

HCC 

Northeastern 

Bay Path College 

UVM 

Westfield State 




THE EARLY BIRD GETS THE WORM! 



I'M ACCEPTED! Brigitte Pelouze 
is doing a victory dance during a 
New Year's Eve party. 



138 SENIORS 



The senior year has 
the notorious rep- 
utation as a time to 
sit back, relax and wait for 
graduation. In reality, be- 
hind this carefree facade, 
every senior is filled with 
anxiety awaiting the re- 
sponse, rejection or accep- 
tance, from college. De- 
cember always marks a 
period of hasty college ap- 
plication writing, the 
dreaded college essay 
hated by all. It's tough, 
but that is only the normal 
application process. 

The senior who chooses 
early decision faces even 
greater anxiety than those 



who go the normal route. 
Early decision is only for 
the student who knows 
definitely the college he or 
she wants to attend. If 
you're acccepted through 
this program, you must 
attend that school. The 
early decision applicant 
must have all of his forms 
in before November, 
which is an incredible 
crunch having just re- 
turned from summer va- 
cation. 

All right, you've done 
early decision, you have 
all your forms in. Now, 
the worst part begins, the 
wait for notification. The 



student doesn't receive a 
response until mid-De- 
cember. All during this 
time, you wonder if what 
you did was right. Do you 
really want to go to this 
school? Are you good 
enough to get in? What if 
I'm deferred, or worse, 
rejected? The questions 
plague you until that fate- 
ful day when either a thin 
envelope or a thick enve- 
lope arrives in the mail- 
box. 

Brad Burnette, who 
was accepted early deci- 
sion at Duke, stated that 
"It was well worth the 
effort." 






TAKING A QUICK break from 
studying during senior study are 
Brigitte Pelouze, Brian Dolaher, 
and Chad Brown. 

DURING a college visit at 
(JMASS Lisa Lewis and Rachel 
Morton pose for a quick picture. 




Daniel Skala 
Brian Smith 
Tarn Smith 
Heidi Solaroli 
Susan Solzak 
Leah Soule 



Jonathan Stahelek 
Martin Stone 
Carl Streeter 
Amy Stuart 
Ellen Sullivan 
James Sullivan 



Lynn Szczebak 
Rebecca Takorian 
Carrie Talbot 
Sara Taylor 
Lisa Tienkin 
Lori Toman 





SHOULD I STAY, OR SHOULD I GO? 







140 SENIORS 



TRYING TO SEDUCE the camera 
with her sexy stance, Andrea 
Chechile poses with pride in front of 
the boys varsity soccer field. 



When the war in 
the Persian 
Gulf started on 
January 16, 1991, many 
seniors became concerned 
about history repeating it- 
self with the government 
proposing a draft as they 
did with Vietnam. 

Some senior boys were 
asked what they thought 
about the possibility of a 
draft, and whether they 
would go. There were 
many mixed emotions. 
Neil Whitfield went so far 
as to volunteer his services 
because he believes in the 
ideas behind the war. On 
August 16, 1991, he will 



leave for basic training in 
the Navy. 

Another pro-war opin- 
ion came from Jim 
Sullivan. "I'd enlist before 
the draft so I would have 
a choice in what I would 
do." Omar Asmar stated, 
"Sure, I'd go. It's for a 
good cause." Tara Reavy 
received a R.O.T.C. schol- 
arship to Boston College. 

Many students feel that 
war is wrong, but they 
would, without a doubt, 
serve their country. 

"If there is a draft, I'd 
go. But, I don't agree with 
the war," stated Nathen 
Root. 



Opposing views were 
resulting from anxiety, 
nervousness, being scared, 
and not wanting to die; all 
very realistic feelings. 

Teri Tousignant said v 
"If there was a draft, I 
would be scared because I 
don't feel like being shot 
in the head." Charlie 
Brown reacted by clainn 
ing, "I'd move to Can-i 
ada." (Why would he pre- 
fer the Canadian army 
over ours?) 

Over all, the students 
didn't think that there 
would be a draft, but one 
never knows . . . 




Terence Tousignant 
Calli Tranghese 
James Troy 
Daniel Truesdale 
Frances Truitt 
Karen Truitt 
Mary Veideman 



Kimberly Venne 
Matthew Wallace 
Mary Wallace 
Thomas Walling 
David Ward 
Courtney Ware 
Michelle Watts 



Kara Welch 
Neal Wit field 
Erica Whittle 
Jennifer Young 
Pamela Zajac 



CATCHING some rays 

Sarah Hsiao and Rylan Grant 
bask in the sunlight while at work 
this summer. 




I DIDN'T DO IT! Vail Mosier plays 
innocent. 



SMILING for the camera Erica 
Dutil and Jen Lynch show off their 
winning smiles. 



ROCKING THE NIGHT 
AWAY Jim Sullivan, Brigitte 
Pelouze, and Scott Hapgood en- 
joy each other's company during 
a New Year's Eve party. 

CRAMMING in study time 
after lunch, Eric Schmitt works on 
the previous night's assignment 
while leaning against some lock- 
ers. 





DURING a fund raiser for Na- 
tional Honors Society at the 
Peach Festival, Brad Burnette, 
Roger Brunelle, and Rob Fortier 
take a break to show the camera 
what they've got. 



SHOWING the camera their 
muscles are Jim Troy, Chad 
Brown, and Jason Robinson. 
They posed in front of a Christ- 
mas tree before the winter semi- 
formal. 




THESE WERE THE BEST OF TIMES 
THESE WERE THE WORST OF TIMES 



DAZZLING us 

with her smile 
Cathy Gagnon sits 
and listens to a 
U.S. History 
lecture. 




MAKING a 

quick stop at his 
locker, Scott 
McFarland get 
books before his 
next class. 



Some students feel 
that high school 
blocks their en- 
trance into the adult 
world. They feel that 
something better is wait- 
ing. Once at college, they 
will finally be considered 
adults. Many who go to 
college won't act like 
adults, and will find them- 
selves explaining the pre- 
vious night to the dean or 
waking up in a flowerbed. 
They will be treated with 
more respect, be able to 
stay out all night, and ba- 
sically do whatever they 
want. 

This sounds terrific but 



there is another side to be 
considered. We live in a 
sheltered and peaceful en- 
vironment. A detention is 
considered to be about as 
bad a penalty the average 
student can receive. An 
average week consists of 
gossiping about the week- 
end, studying (or avoiding 
studying) for the next test, 
and trying to "get away 
with stuff." Money comes 
from part time jobs or stu- 
dents' own form of the 
24-hour telling machine: 
their parents. 

This is high school life. 
Some people can't wait to 
"get out of here and be on 



my own." When on his 
own, a whole plethora of 
new worries appear. In 
high school, one doesn't 
have to worry about 
raises, mortgage pay- 
ments, and a whole host of 
other adult problems. 
Once graduated, things 
change: detentions be- 
come arrests; internals be- 
come probation; and ex- 
ternals become jail. The 
"next test" is a major 
exam in college. Flunking 
one of these will not go 
over well with those who 
pay tuition. Pressures go 
up a notch upon entering 
the adult world. 



The four years spent a 
M.R.H.S. should be sa 
vored for what they are 
the end of childhood. One 
still lives with his parents 
and can be grounded foi 
infractions of family rules 
In ten years, a week alone 
in one's room may be con 
sidered a vacation! Thti 
adult world is not full o:< 
misery. Yet, one should 
look upon "the high 
school experience" as ar ' 
end of one era and tht 
beginning of a more com 
plicated, and more excit 
ing one. 



1 




MAKING her way through the sunlight Sara Taylor stops and admires the scenery during a field trip to the Roosevelt Estate and Vanderbilt 
mansion with the Honors English and U.S. Honors History classes. 



ARE YOU STRESSED? 



ROB THORPE and Cynthia 
Brescia give the E-Block Junior 
Honors English class their rendi- 
tion of Lear and Cordelia from 
King Lear. 




If you were Becky 
Beacom, you said, 
"Sometimes. It de- 
pends on the day," sum- 
marizing the feelings of 
many us. If you were 
Kellie Raczka, you 
wailed, "I'm too young to 
feel this kind of stress!" 
Okay. If you were Jody 
Kasten, you said, "YES. 
Mostly school," and then 
attempted to make 
amends by saying, "I am 
a happy person some- 
times." 

Sounds like many of us 
are working ourselves into 
a frenzy. Those of us who 
like English tear our hair 
out over things like alge- 
bra and chemistry. Those 
of us who are good at 
math and science are try- 
ing to figure out why the 
latest English write we 



turned in came back scrib- 
bled in red. Both groups 
have been known to wail 
out in the dark hours be- 
fore dawn, "Does any- 
body care?" 

Others of us are not 
stressed at all. If you were 
Rachel Bannon and/or 
Chris Lucarelle, you an- 
swered "No." Plain and 
simple, huh? If you were 
Eric Boduch, you gave a 
modified answer-"Not 
particularly." And if you 
were Rob Goettler, you 
went off on a tangent 
about the whole thing: 
"Stress is an interesting 
thing. None is not enough. 
You need the right 
amount of stress to keep 
you on your toes. Modera- 
tion is the key to every- 
thing in life." 





Adamson, Jason 

Albee, Douglas 

Alves, Susan 

Anderson, Cory 

Anderson, Lisa 

Asselin, Michele 

Babineau, Angela 

Balboni, Christopher 

Bannon, Rachel 

Baron, Bridget 

Batista, Mary 

Beacom, Rebecca 

Belcher, Kandra 

Bienvenue, Spence 

Bleau, Heather 

Bluteau, Nicole 

Boduch, Eric 

Boissonnault, Nicole 

Boudreau, Carrie 

Bower, Doulgas 

Brescia, Cynthia 

Bressette, Kathy 

Breton, Jennifer 

Brunton, Robert 

Burger, Todd 

Burke, Beverly 

Callahan, Robin 

Carter, Jason 

Carter, Michael 

Casagrande, John 

Casey, Matthew 

Cavanaugh, Brendan 

Cavros, Kristen 

Champigny, Michael 

Charles, Sabine 

Chase, Pamela 

Chechette, Steve 

Christok i, Bryan 

Cirillo, Giovanni 

Clines, Andrew 




144 JUNIORS 







NOT WILLING to wear a full 
costume, but wanting to partici- 
pate, Clarence Martin, sports his 
pumpkin antennae during lunch 
on Halloween. 

Kathy Bresette and Matt Casey 
discuss their plans for the upcom- 
ing weekend as they walk from 
their F-Block Math Analysis class 
to G-Block. 





Colclough, Heather 
Courtney, Marie 
Coyle, Shawn 
Currier, Stacy 
Damato, Edward 
Darvin, John 
David, Andrea 
Dean, William 
Decesare, Dana 
Decoteau, Sherry 
Degray, Mark 
Delisle, Laurie 
Desjardins, Anthony 
Desousa, Trista 
Devries, Paul 
Dill, Holly 
Dolan, Diana 
Donnelly, Sandra 
Dowd, Peter 
Dowling, Kerri 
Dubord, James 
Ducharme, Amanda 
Dugan, Matthew 
Durzy, Alexander 
Estrada, Lori 
Farrah, Charles 
Ferrindino, Jennifer 
Ferris, Leslie 
Fiore, Tina 
Forcier, Andrew 
Forrant, Kimberly 
Frantzen, David 
Frederick, Eric 
Gagliarducci, Jerome 
Gaudette, Mara 
Geldart, Allison 
Gibb, Rebecca 
Gibson, Renee 
Gil, Lynn 
Glover, Matthew 



JUNIORS 145 



EMOTIONAL UPS AND 
DOWNS 



The teenage years 
are, in most cases, 
the most exciting 
and emotional years 
of one's life. As juniors, 
we are in the prime of our 
teenage years. Therefore, 
we are experiencing even 
more emotions than other 
teenagers. It's a fact that 
junior year is one of the 
most stressful in all of our 
high school years. Charity 
Manegre said that she be- 
comes stressed "when I 
can't figure out what to 
wear." When asked when 
she feels stress, Kristen 
Cavros replied, "I was 
stressed when I had to 
write a nine page term 
paper in one night." 

Term papers. How dare 
I mention those two 
words? The average junior 
could have about three 
term papers but, if you are 
lucky enough to be in hon- 
ors courses, you could 
have six of them. Horror! 
Stress, is not the feeling 
all juniors have. Matt 



Casey replied, "I was 
happy when I passed a 
Math Analysis exam!" 

Renee Gibson said she 
was happy "when I got 
accepted into District!" 
Teenagers experience 
many emotions, as we 
have seen. One not men- 
tioned here is hate. Eliza- 
beth Tencza explained, 
"The good thing about 
hate is that you are not 
born knowing how to do 
it. The bad thing about 
hate is that there are mil- 
lions of people who are 
more than willing to teach 
you." 

Yes, juniors, as with all 
other teenagers, experi- 
ence a variety of emotions, 
both good and bad. How- 
ever, it's a part of life that 
will benefit us in the long 
run. So, hang in there! 

ACTIVELY INVOLVED in the 
construction of a large scale Torri 
Gates is Spence Bienvenue. The 
project was done while Susan 
Boss worked with Art classes. 








Goettler, Robert 

Gouvin, Rebecca 

Gralinski, Shawn 

Granaudo, Karen 

Gravelin, Laura 

Gray, Derek 

Grono, Jennifer 

Halloran, Brendan 

Hanson, Bonnie 

Hebert, Christopher 

Hedlund, Seth 

Herbert, Jennifer 

Hill, Frederick 

Hogan, Shane 

Hughes, Kevin 

Hughes, Kristen 

Ingram, Kimberly 

Jackson, Michael 

Jenkinson, Amy 

Joyal, Eric 

Kapner, Jonathan 

Kasten, Jody 

Kennedy, John 

Kerbel, Jonathan 

Kibbe, Jonathan 

Kim, Eun-ah 

Kisner, Kristie 

Kraus, Amy 

Kulis, Mark 

Langdon, Robert 

LaPlante, Cherie 

Lavoie, Jeffrey 



146 JUNIORS 



IN ANTICIPATION of an enjoy- 
able junior English class, Chris 
Lucarelle smiles. 

MAKING A FEW last minute 
corrections,Amy Jenkinson looks 
over her English assignment in 
Mr. Tipaldi's class on Halloween. 




ON HER WAY OUT of study, 
Charity Manegre smiles, happy 
that she's one class closer to the 
end of the day. 





Leger, Allan 
Leray, Erin 
Leritz, Elizabeth 
Lewenczuk, Jason 
Liese, Amy 
Little, Jennifer 
Loper, Alexis 

Lucarelle, Christopher 
Luczek, Michael 
Lynch, Christopher 
Mahoney, Christine 
Manegre, Charity 
Marrero, Martin 
Martin, Clarence 

Marvaso, Sara 
Mascara, Gregory 
Mascara, Michael 
McCray, Louis 
McCurry, Michael 
McDonald, Erin 
McDonald, George 

Merigian, Lisa 
Michaelski, Jody 
Moore, Jeffrey 
Mumper, John 
Murray, Jessamy 
Nakashian, Lauren 
Ng, Richard 



JUNIORS 147 




Megan Nicole 

John Noble 

Renee Nooney 

Donald Nordstrom 

Thaddeus Nowak 

Chanda Ober 

Kealy O'Brien 

Jeremiah O'Callaghan 

Sheila O'Donnell 

Robert O'Neil 

Rebecca Orr 

Tracy Pafumi 

Jeffrey Paolone 

Amy Paroia 

Marc Penso 

Dineen Parker 

Kara Perkins 

Jill Perman 

Bryson Perri 

Stephanie Pietryka 

Aaron Pilarcik 

Wendy Poole 

Alan Poremba 

Robert Pridemore 

Kellie Raczka 

Lisa Raschilla 

Sandra Roache 

Caetano Rodamilans 

Peter Rodgers 

Brian Rogers 

Stephanie Roj 

Dean Rosenthal 

Amy Ross 

Kara Ruscio 

Bethany Sager 

Anita Salomone 

Charles Savoie 

Christine Scagiiarini 

Jodi Shepard 

Dana Shults 




148 JUNIORS 



COMPANIONS 




A 



fter school, many 
students have 
sports practices 
or jobs. However, there 
are those students who 
have other callings that 
compel them to go home. 
Lisa Raschilla states, 
"After school I brush my 
horses and the ponies, 
then, depending on the 
day, (whether it is my sis- 
ter's turn or mine,) I feed 
the rest of the animals." 

Pets are a part of many 
of our lives. Jeff Moore 
replied, "I think every- 
body should have a pet. 
They keep you company 
when no one else is 
home." 

The type of pets which 
people have vary from 
cats, dogs, rabbits, and 
birds to newts, and small 



swordfish. Almost every- 
one loves animals. How- 
ever, there are those who 
don't. 

Lauren Nakashian said, 
"Everybody hates my 
dog, so I beat them up 
because I love him." Leah 
Zadrozney says her cats 
sleep at the end of her bed. 

To sum up the general 
feeling about animals, 
Angela Babineau replied, 
"They make good 
friends." 

Some juniors are still 
hounded today about 
things their dogs did over 
eight years ago. Kandy 
Belcher's dog, Kelly, nor- 
mally a very calm dog, bit 
Chris Hebert in the sec- 
ond grade. Chris has 
never let Kandy forget 
that moment. 




GABBING AWAY on the 
phone during lunch, Sheila 
O'Donnell adds a relaxing inter- 
lude to her hectic school day. 




Yammira Santos 
Todd Shumate 
Shane Smith 
Craig Soukup 
Russell St. Pierre 



Craig Stitsinger " 
Shauna Sutton 
William Szafarowicz 
Tammy Teece 
Elizabeth Tencza 
Stephanie Thiffault 
Jason Thomas 
Robert Thorpe 
Scott Topor 
Anthony Tranghese 
Rita Trolio 
Jana Tromblay 
Ryan Trombly 
Jennifer Turgeon 
Jennifer Tyler 
William Veideman 
Stacey Verville 
Henry Wawrzonek 
Kenneth Wegiel 
Eric White 
Heather Wholley 
Lauren Willoughby 
Joe Wilson 
Kimberly Wyzik 
R. Jeffrey Young 
Leah Zadrozny 
Karen Zahr 
Amanda Zepke 
Michelle Zhe 
Kristel Zimmermann 
Stephanie Ziobro 
Jessica Zollner 



JUNIORS 149 



WHEN Joyce Sager talks, ev- 
eryone listens. Jen Santiago 
takes in what Doctora says during 
F-Block Spanish class. 



THE SWINGING LOG requires 
both timing and balance. Andrew 
Smith proves that he has both 
during his gym class. 



DRESSED AS A WATER- 
MELON, Angela Brunelle enjoys 
her lunch. She is one of the many 
who wore a costume on Hallow- 
een. 





Albano, Jon 

Allard, Cindy 

Alves, Lucy 

Anderson, Lisa 

Arabik, Jessie 

Atcheson, Noah 

Balmer, Philip 

Beaupre, Charles 

Berg, Ronnie 

Bernard, Ray 

Berte, Richard 

Bishop, David 

Blaser, Bryan 

Bopp, Chris 

Bradbury, Annie 

Brady, Bill 

Bready, Sheri 

Brunelle, Angela 

Brunelle, Eric 

Burk, Wendy 

Burke, Erin 

Burke, Stephanie 

Burnett, Ben 

Cecchi, Anthony 



What do you look 
for in a guy? 



Chaffee, Sage 

Connery, Shawn 

Cook, Tricia 

Courtney, Thomas 

Couture, Colette 

Cowles, Robert 

Crivelli, Katherine 

Cronin, Lianne 

Currier, Amy 

Davenport, John 

Day, Heather 

Dean, Melissa 

ing, Casey 

io, Michaell 

ay, Eric 




"Personality" 
Maureen Dempsey 



"Sensitivity" 
Michelle Ladoux 



"A good taste in 

music" 

Sue Marini 



"Muscles" 
Sara Valentine 





150SOPHOM 




THE EXTRA MILE 



Whether work- 
ing, attending 
special interest 
groups, or playing sports, 
challenged students find 
the time. This does not, in 
anyway, exclude sopho- 
mores. 

Working at Mc- 
Donalds, as Linda Wall- 
ing does, may seem easy, 
but don't let yourself 
think this. Among school- 
work, sports, family, 
friends, eating, and sleep- 
ing, work is a hard task to 
keep going. 

Interesting groups ap- 
peal to Nicole LaPierre, as 



she holds the Lieutenant 
Governor position in the 
district for Key Clubs, 
and attempts to stop the 
war in Central America 
with another club. 

Dancing Tamara 
Fontaine attends five clas- 
ses per week. While an- 
other dedicated student 
Judy Maleckas states, "I 
love to Irish Step Dance 
and I hope that one day 
I'll qualify to go to Ireland 
and compete with the 
world's best. I also enjoy 
seeing all of the smiles 
that my dancing brings 








&ZE 




Deshais, Wendy 
Derosier, Michelle 
Difilippp, Nina 
Dolaher, Melissa 
Drenzek, Ian 
Duffy, Catherine 
Dutil, Genevieve 
Dutton, Cederia 
Dutton, Deborah 
Eaton, Neil 
Emanuel, Nathan 
Emerle, Matt 
Everett, Suzanne 
Fernandes, Teresa 
Fitzgerald, Coleen 
Fontaine, Tamara 
Fournier, Jon 
Fulton, Barbara 
Gagnon, Thomas 
Gentile, Carrie 
Gilbert, Thomas 
Giles, Scott 
Gillen, Erin 
Gilligan, Kelly 



"Body" 
Chris Berte 



"Humor" 
Dave Labadorf 



"Height" 
Ray Royer 



"Smells good' 
Jessie Warga 



What do you look 
for in a girl? 








Giordano, Derek 
Goodreau, Michael 
Goodrich, Charrice 
Guttdhrer, Kevin 
Graham, Chad 
Grimaldi, Angela 
Grono, Walter 
Grundstrom, Tim 
Gullberg, Bridget 
Gural, Alexandra 
Gutride, Dana 
Haas, Michael 
Hanks, David 
Hapgood, Carrie 
Harris, Becky 
Henshon, Andrew 



SOPHOMORES 151 



ALL THE STUDENTS on 
Prowty's Landing are waiting for 
Kristin Nelson as she swings over 
to them. 





Hitchcock, Amy 

Howells, Nathan 

Hsiao, Melanie 

Hurst, Patrick 

Jack, Stephen 

Jennings, Angus 

Jerr, Matthew 

Kantor, Joshua 

Kennedy, John 

Kertenis, Jason 

Ketshek, Michael 

Kim, Lia 

Kozub, Paul 

Labadorf, David 

Lague, Robert 

LaPierre, Nicole 

Lapointe, Felicia 

Laraway, Melissa 

Leahey, Elizabeth 

Ledoux, Michelle 

Legere, Roy 

Logan, Christine 

MacFarlane, Chris 

Mack, Cathy 



What is the easiest 
way to get out of 
participating in 
class? 



Mackie, Jennifer 

Maleckas, Judy 

Maltby, Kevin 

Manning, William 

Marini, Susan 

Mascaro, Leonard 

Matthew, Jason 

McCarthy, Karen 

McCrae, Chris 

McQranahan, Lynne 

McGrath, Jim 

Mercure, Jennifer 

zewski. Amy 

Miller, Elaine 

:hell, Kristie 

Mondor, Brian 




'Go to the nurse' 
Jen Mercure 



"Sleep in the 

corner" 
Ben Burnette 



"I was absent and 

didn't understand 

the material." 

Terri Pajak 



"Make it look like I 

you know what 

you are doing." 

Sara Valentine 




152 SOPHL 



3ALANCE is the key to the 

Aohawk Walk. Chris Tarantino 
lttempts to show his stuff in E- 
Jlock gym class. 



TO GET MORE THAN THREE 
PEOPLE on Prowty's Landing is a 
task. Mike Spillane is attempting 
to fit seven on without any con- 
cern. 



LEARNING THE ROPES 




Project Adventure 
brings the class to- 
gether because 
they have to work to- 
gether. It make them 
more cohesive when they 
know if they work to- 
gether they can move 
mountains," said Mrs. 
Patricia Polchlopek. 

Of the few students 
who don't like to partici- 
pate in some of the other 
games that are played, 
almost all participate in 
Project Adventure. They 
even do the height activi- 
ties such as the High 
Two Wires and the Tra- 



peze. Melissa Dolahe was 
asked if she gets nervous. 
Her answer-"No way! I'm 
very immune to going up 
to high places." 

As sophomores, they 
need the chance to come 
together as a class. They 
had freshmen year to meet 
new people, junior and 
senior year to stay a class 
until they go to college. 
Therefore, it is Project 
Adventure which brings 
the class together and 
starts the lifelong friend- 
ship. 




"Not enough time" "I left it at home' 
Heath Bleau Bill Brady 



"I forgot." 
Nicole LaPierre 



"Jammed locker'' 
Gretchen Moody 




Moody, Gretchen 
Moore, Alison 
Morse, Melissa 
Muldrew, Ben 
Murphy, Jeff 
Nelson, Kristin 
Nicole, Melissa 
Niziolek, Adam 
Ober, Kim 
O'Connor, Tara 
Overton, Sean 
Paige, Clark 
Pajak, Terri 
Paris, Nicole 
Patterson, Jolene 
Peck, Cara 
Person, BecM 
Pfohl, Shannon 
Phillips, Stacy 
Plowe, Mary 
Poremba, Michael 
Port, Mischa 
Potvin, Dominique 
Prochnow, Natalie 



What is an excuse 
for not handing in 
your homework? 



Pytko, Jason 
Reich, Michael 
Rigney, John 
Roberts, Michael 
Ross, Elizabeth 
Roy, Michael 
Royer, Ray 
Sagalyn, Eric 
Santiago, Jennifer 
Sargent, Cathy 
Sarno, Christine 
Sartori, Maria 
Sartwell, Scott 
Schohfield, Nathan 
Simons, Amity 
Skiff, Judy 



SOPHOMORES 153 



Smead, Christopher 
Smith, Amy 
Smith, Andrew 
Smith, Gwert 
Smith, Kara 
Smith, Kevin 
Smith, Kevin 
Smith, Scott 



What's the easiest 
way to get into 
trouble? 



Soule, Daniel 

Soule, David 

Souza, Jeremy 

Spear, Amy 

Sperry, Brooke 

Spillane, Michael 

Stahlberg, Shaina 

Stratton, Meg 




'%sA 




f . J 




i 



^1 



"Skip a class and 

get caught" 

Jen Mackie 



"Get caught 

smoking in the 

bathroom" 

Cathy Mack 



"I wouldn't 

know. " 

Kelli Walbridge 



"Skip detention' 
Ed Miner 



0$k 



i 



i 





WORKING TOGETHER on a 
project, Wendy Burk and Linda 
Walling jot down ideas. Wendy 
and Linda are in the same Spanish 
3 class. 



154 SOPHOMORES 






"f~*~-* r " 



-Cry' 
Kelli Walbridge 



"Brown Nose" 
Kelly Gilligan 



"Lie" 
Steve Bidus 



'Talk your way 
out of it" 
Jason Pyko 




Michael Sweeney 
Anne Tarantino 
Chris Tarantino 
Shawn Taylor 
Amy Toulson 
Lauren Troy 
Sara Valentine 
Christine Vecchio 



What's the easiest 
way to get out of 
trouble? 



Jason Vedovelli 
Marcel Verdon 
Jarod Vermette 
Kelli Walbridge 
Linda Walling 
Jesse Warga 
Sean Weinberg 
Cara White 




SOPHOMORES not pic- 

tured: Chander Gardner, Ransom 
Morin, and Matthew Penso. 

THE SOPHOMORE Student 
Government Officers: Melanie 
Hsiao, Andrew Henshon, Nicole 
LaPierre, and Angela Brunelle. 



bT*"^ 



<*m\ ■*' 




SPIRIT OF '93 



PLANNING an activity for the 
children in Child Study are Cathy 
Crivelli and Tara O'Connor. 



The excitement of 
freshman year has 
died down; reality 
has set it. Tests, reports, 
and projects are piling up 
on the sophomore class. 
Gretchen Moody sums it 
up with, "Work, work, 
work!" 

Yet the class of '93 still 
makes time to have fun. "I 
always look forward to 
weekends and seeing my 
friends," Angus Jennings 
states. 

Now, being more famil- 
iar with the school, we feel 
more secure in extra cur- 



ricular activities. Soccer, 
gymnastics, student gov- 
ernment, you name it; the 
spirit of '93 is there. 
Pocket calendar and orna- 
ment sales push us ahead 
to our goals. 

The dream to be an up- 
per classman is so close 
but it is a car license away. 
For us, permit is the word 
and parent co-drivers. 

The class looks fondly 
back at our freshman year 
and looks ahead to our 
years with great expecta- 
tions. 



SOPHOMORES 155 



Agnew, Elizabeth 

Amsden, Kerry 

Anderson, Jeffrey 

Ashwell, Nancy 

Avery, Amy 

Balser, Heather 

Bannon, Rebecca 

Baron, Eric 

Beacom, Amy 

Belcher, Kristin 

Belcher, Sharon 

Bennett, Sara 

Bergeron, Joshua 

Bertelli, Amanda 

Bertelli, Kellie 

Binns, Ethan 

Bishop, Janet 

Bleau, Heath 

Bliss, Tracy 

Blume, Emily 

Boudreau, Paul 

Brady, Jennifer 

Brand, Jenny 

Brown, Hillary 

Brunetti, Anthony 

Bruscoe, Paris 

Burr, Jeffrey 

Camerlin, Ryan 

Campbell, Katharine 

Candage, Jason 

Cantalini, Joseph 

Carrol], Thomas 









m 



FIRST CLA££ = 




READY to go out on Halloween 
are Donald Duck and Minnie 
Mouse, Chip Perkins and Seth 
Crocker. 

BREANNE L'HECIRECJX 

gazes at some papers. Could it be 
a map to find her way to her next 

class? 




- " 1,-^3! 



156 FRESHMEN 




Chappel, Loron 
Chiecko, Jennifer 
Colclough, George 
Condon, Jennifer 
Coppola, Evan 
Cordi, Tina 
Cote, Christina 
Crocker, Seth 
Cubin, Ryan 
Cwiok, Eric 
D'Amato, Rebecca 
Darcy, Erin 
Davis, Joia 
Dean, Matthew 
DeForge, Dena 
Delisle, Jeffrey 
DeNucci, Thomas 
Dernavich, Darrell 
Difilippo. Michelle 
Dini, Vesal 
Dolaher, Eric 
Dolben, Molly 
Donovan, Jarrod 
Drenzek, Tiffany 
Dubord, Rebecca 
Duffy, Keith 
Durant, Angie 
Dynak, Christopher 
Farrell, Kimberly 
Fernandez, Vanessa 
Ferreira, Jose 
Fidalgo, Chad 



i 



FRESHMEN FEAR 



I didn't want to go to 
the bathroom on the 
first day of school be- 
cause I was afraid that I 
wouldn't come out alive," 
said an anonymous Fresh- 
man about thoughts that 
had run through her head 
in September. For most of 
us, this may seem a little 
drastic, but each Fresh- 
man had his own fears and 
worries about the new 
school. 

Angie Durant said, 
"My worst fear was of 
falling down the stairs. I 
could just imagine falling 
and taking twenty stu- 
dents with me." 

Then there were the up- 
perclassmen. There were 
some that sent you to E- 
Hall to find the stairs, and 



then there were the ones 
that showed you the stairs 
personally. Many Fresh- 
men wondered which one 
would happen to them. 

George Colclough put 
it best when describing his 
fear. "I had this fear of 
dropping my books in the 
hall and having all of my 
stuff everywhere. All of 
the upperclassmen would 
stare at me and think, 
what a stupid Freshman!" 

The most common 
fears of all were of getting 
lost ... of getting caught 
staring at your map ... of 
being twenty minutes late 
to class because you were 
having your own private 
tour of the school, or of 
realizing halfway through 
a block that you are not 



supposed to be there. 

No matter what crazy 
fears Freshman may have 
had, we have survived the 
first few months of school, 
soon to be upperclassmen. 



# 



M 



MANY freshmen fear high 
school sports, but Eric Dolaher 
feels you should just try to have 
fun. 



FRESHMEN 157 



Fitzgerald, Brian 

Freed, Meghan 

French, Dawn 

Gagnon, Mark 

Gagnon, William 

Gallagher, Stacy 

Galvin, Jamie 

Gelinas, Kara 

Geromini, Jason 

Graham, Dana 

Gralenski, Andrea 

Grondalski, Brian 

Hanson, Jonathan 

Haryasz, Mark 

Hayes, Lindsay 

Hebert, Angela 

Hebert, Timothy 

Hill, Naomi 

Hodge, Andrew 

Hopges, Sean 

Houle, Kelly 

Hoyt, Laurel 

Hudson, Tonda 

Jackson, Rosemary 

Jodoin, Cory 

Jordan, Robert 

Kerbel, Christopher 

Kilduff, Keith 

King, Jeffrey 

Kingsbury, Elana 

Kinnear, Jaime 

Kirk, Rosemary 

Korzon, Scott 

Kosek, Jason 

Kotomski, Jennifer 

Krawczyk, Sacha 

Kwong, Marsha 

Lambert, Alan 

Laplante, Cherie 

Laraway, Matthew 

Lavoie, Roger 

Lempart, John 

Lessard, Pamela 

Lewis, Celeste 

L'Heureux, Breanne 

Liese, Scott 

Luczek, Steven 

Lydon, Jessica 

Mackenzie, Scott 

Mageau, Michael 

Marcelynas, Lisa 

Matthews, Corey 

McAleer, Katherine 

McCurry, Sara 

McDiarmid, Robert 

McFarland, Bryan 

McGill, Alexandar 

Menard, Ann 

Mercure, Jessica 

Merigian, Michael 

Metzger, William 

Meyer, Kristen 

Mikolajczuk, Steven 

Miller, Ryan 

Moon, Peter 

Moore, Gregory 

Moriarty, Kay 

Moriarty, Patrick 

Morton, Sara 

Mosellen, Chris 

Motyka, Eric 

Motyka, Shawn 

Musiak, Brian 

Myers, Kenneth 

Napolitan, Shiloh 

Noonan, Ryan 

O'Callaghan, Christian 

Opitz, Paul 

Osman, David 




158 FRESHMEN 



HOW EMBARRASSING! 



When I was about 
to put my tray 
on the table, I 
accidentally dropped it 
and my salad went all 
over the place. The sen- 
iors at the table behind 
me stood up and started 
whistling and clapping!" 
states a freshman, who 
wishes to remain anony- 
mous. 

Every freshman wor- 
ries about embarrassing 
himself. Some of the usu- 
al embarrassing moments 

WHILE relaxing in study, 
Sharon Belcher is easily em- 
barrassed as someone from 
/earbook tries to take her pic- 
lure. 



are: falling on your way 
up the center stairs, being 
tripped in the hall, drop- 
ping your lunch tray, 
walking into the wrong 
class, or asking someone 
where to go and being 
sent to the wrong place. 
That's quite a bit to wor- 
ry about! 

Fortunately, most of 
these fears will never 
come true, but for some 
unfortunate Freshmen 



THE FRESHMEN student 
government officers are Kevin 
Sheran, Ken Myers, Dave Sa- 
galyn, and Scott Korzon. 



"I thought the day was over, so I went to the gym locker room to 
get ready for football practice. I stayed there for about twenty 
minutes before I realized that I had one more block left." 

-Dave Tenbrook 



"I didn't have my locker for 
four days of school and I was 
carrying my books out of gym 
and one of my books fell off 
the stack and hit a junior in the 
head!" 



-Lindsay Hayes 



"I went to the wrong class and 

stayed there the whole block." 

-Bill Metzger 





>1 



FRESHMEN 159 



EF/RCT CLA££= 




WE ALL HAD a favorite game 
when we were younger. Bill 
Metzger and Bill Gagnon loved 
Monopoly. 

IDENTIFYING rocks and 
minerals was the topic of the lab 
Jeff Delisle worked on for several 
class days. 



Page, Karena 

Paquette, Sharon 

Parisan, Jonathan 

Patullo, Jennifer 

Perkins, William 

Pessolano, Amy 

Phaneuf, Russell 

Piecuch, Stephen 

Piscioneri, Andre 

Post, Daniel 

Provencher, Dave 

Pyzocha, Lori 

Quin, Erica 

Quinlivan, Christopher 

Radner, Joel 

Raffa, Lauren 

Richards, Daniel 

Robinson, Alyssa 

Rowe, Jason 

Roy, Paula 

Ryder, Tricia 

Sabbides, Jason 

Sagalyn, David 

Schmitt, Colin 

Schoek, Thomas 

Schofield, Sarah 

Selvia, David 

Sheran, Kevin 

Shoum, Kimberly 

Skiba, Joshua 

Slatcher, Virginia 

Small, Terry 

Smart, Heather 

Smith, Colby 

Soja, Mark 




160 FRESHMEN 




ON BEING A FRESHMAN 



Everyone says 
Freshmen get the 
bum wrap. But, 
does being a Fresh- 
men always matter? I 
looked and found a few 
cases where it didn't. 
Many Freshmen were 
moved up to Varsity dur- 
ing fall sports. One of 
these Freshmen, Elana 
Kingsbury said this: 

"Being moved up to 
Varsity was great, because 
it helped me gain more 
experience playing with 
older people in a team." 

There are also the 
mixed classes. From Math 
to Enghsh and Spanish, 
many Freshmen were sur- 



prised at the number of 
upperclassmen in their 
classes. 

"Sometimes it makes 
me nervous when I know 
upperclassmen are there 
listening to every word I 
say and wrong answer I 
give," said Breanne 
L'Heureux. 

Of course, there are 
those times when being a 
Freshmen does matter. 
We're the first ones that 
come to mind when a sen- 
ior feels like making fun of 
someone or when you 
have one of those 
embarassing moments. 
Better luck next year! 




THE DICTIONARY is a helpful 
guide as Jon Hanson works on his 
report which is due the next day. 






£S 


L^ 


h 


\MI • 






Hr?' (pW^ 



I 



FRESHMEN NOT PIC- Suzanne Larro, David Maloney, 

TURED are Jason Burkins, Renee Catherine Martin, Shamus Pa- 

Cadieux, Marcelle Daris, lermo, Christina Pikul, Brett 

Christopher Fratini, Lory Gonyea, Roberts, and Kristje Robinson. 
Christy Gouvin, Cherie LaPlante, 



■ 



Soukup, Jason 
Stevenson, Daniel 
Stolarcyk, Courtney 
Sullivan, Thomas 
Tabb, Kevin 
Tenbrook, David 
Tessier, Danielle 
Theocles, Mary 
Thomas, Otis 
Tichacek, Katherine 
Tipaldi, Allison 
Tranghese, John 
Triggs, Patrick 
Tromblay, Mark 
Trombley, Robert 
Trombly, Courtney 
Tumey, Christopher 
Tumey, Scott 
Turcotte, Nina 
Clrzedowski, Scott 
Vonflatern, Erin 
Wagner, William 
Waite, Marc 
Washington, David 
Wegiel, Sharon 
Weiner, Jennifer 
Weller, Bryan 
Winseck, Adam 
Wright, Amy 
Wuerthele, Lane 
Yim, Seoug 
Young, Jonathan 



FRESHMEN 161 



Goodbye Mr. K. 

When the year began, Mr. Robert Kirschling hardly expected to be leaving 
his post as guidance counselor to serve his country. 



MR. KIRSCHLING and senior Ten Tousignant stan 
by an Air Force jet at the Westover Air Show this pas<: 
summer. 



INTRODUCING the public to the Air Force' 
supply carrying jet was Mr. Kirschling's job during th 
Air Show. 



The summer began what was 
thought to be a mere disagreement 
between the United States and Sa- 
udi Arabia involving the oil supply. But 
for Mr. Robert Kirschling it has really hit 
home. Fourteen years after the Vietnam 
War, Mr. Kirschling decided, "If America 
goes to war, I want to take part in it." 

The last reserve list to be called was in 
1968, during the Vietnam War. Reservists 
make up the majority of soldiers going to 
Saudi Arabia, 60% of whom are in the Air 
Force Reserve. 

A four star general decided that since 
Mr. Kirschling's list had been called up on 
four different occasions and each time 
rejected, that it was now his time to serve. 

Mr. Kirschling is a lieutenant com- 



mander at Westover. He is in command of 
the 42nd Aeriel Port Sqaudrant which 
builds pallets for cargo airplanes, weighs 
and marks vehicles carried on the planes, 
and also loads and unloads planes. Being 
that Mr. Kirschling is in the reserves, he 
could be sent anywhere in the world at any 
time. His family has been worried about 
when and where he will be stationed. 

Now, Mr. Kirschling along with many 
others, have the opportunity to prove their 
loyalty to this great country called Amer- 
ica. 

This article was written before Mr. 
Kirschling left. 

Interview and article by: 
Nicole Bluteau and Kara Ruscio 




Miss Christine Alquist: Reading Skills; Learn Study; Intermediate Earth; 

Earth; PSAT/SAT Prep. 
Mrs. Marilyn Ats: Latin 1 , 2, 3, 4; JCL Adviser 
Mr. Daniel Balser: Power Mechanics 1 , 2; Industrial Arts; Coach JV Softball 

and JV Girls' Soccer 
Mr. Donald Bamford: AP Calculus; Pre-Algebra; Algebra 2; Algebra 12; 

Math Department Chairman 
Ms. Kathy Banis: LPVEC Classroom Assistant 
Mrs. Anita Bannon: Front Office Secretary 
Mrs. Lois Barber: Bookkeeper Superintendent's Office 
Mr. Martin Barrett: Physical Education Teacher; Driver Education; HCV 

Boys' Cross Country 
Mr. David Barry: U.S. History; Intermediate Social Studies; METCO 

Coordinator; Social Studies Department Chairman; Varsity Golf Coach 
Mrs. Teresa Barton: Algebra 2; Geometry 2; Math Analysis; Pre-Algebra; 

Algebra 11 
Mr. Charles Beeler: Music Theory; Concert Band; Honors Wind Ensemble; 

Music Department Chairman 
Mr. David Bennett: Physical Education Teacher; Health; HCV Girls; 

Basketball and Track; HCV Football 
Mr. David Bernstein: Rhetoric Film; English 2; School Committee 
Ms. Connie Bienvenue: LPVEC Classroom Assistant 
Mrs. Judith Borsari: Guidance Counselor 

Mrs. Donna Boucher: Attendance Secretary 

Mrs. Maureen Bransford: Intermediate Biology 

Ms. MaryLou Brewer: Honors U.S. History; Honors Senior Seminar; New 

England Life; Model Congress Adviser; MBA Mock Law Adviser 
Mr. Richard Brown: Honors Chemistry; Chemistry; Science Department 

Chairman 
Mrs. Donna Cardarelli: English 1 , 2; Popular Short Story 

Miss Patricia Cascio: Physical Education Teacher 

Mr. Stephen Castonguay: History of Civilization; World History; Psychology; 

International Club Adviser 
Ms. Maureen Collins: METCO Tutor 
Mrs. Jani srmier: Physical Education Teacher; Adaptive Physical 

Education; Special Education tutor 
Ms, AnnMarie Corrieri: LPVEC Head Teacher 




162 FACULTY 



U.S. AIR FORCE 



3570 



C/C %/ P. WilJa** 



mMMwi/ 





Ms. JoAnne Dalmolin: Pre-Algebra; Algebra 1 1 ; Geometry 1 ; Algebra 1 ,2; 

Honors Algebra 2; MAT 
Mrs. Margaret Daniele: Spanish 2,4,5; Foreign Language Department 

Chairperson 
Mrs. Christine Danker: Special Education Teacher and Tutor; Class of 1 993 

Adviser 
Mr. John Deely: Accounting; Advanced Accounting; Business Law; Business 

Math; Career Exploration; School Store; HCV Girls' Soccer 
Mrs. Johanna Desaultelle: Media Center 
Mrs. Elizabeth DeSimone: History of Civilization; World History; Model G.N. 

Adviser 
Mr. Paul Deslauriers: Special Education Teacher 
Mr. James DeWolf: Technical Drawing; Industrial Arts; C/A Draft 
Mrs. Patricia Donnelly: Special Education Teacher 
Mrs. Patricia Donovan: LPVEC Classroom Assistant 

Miss Marie Driscoll: Director of Guidance 

Mr. Raymond Drury: Concert Choir; Treble Choir; Honors Madrigals; Music 

History 
Mrs. Peggy Durzy: LPVEC Classroom Assistant 
Ms. Elizabeth Fisk: LPVEC PTA 
Mrs. Susan Fitts: Geometry 2; Math 10; Algebra 2; Trigonometry 



Mrs. Joanne Forcier: Assistant Computer Services 
Mrs. Joanne Fornier: Guidance Secretary 
Mr. Peter Gartner: Director of Special Education 
Ms. Candida Geissinger: Special Education Tutor 

Mr. James Girotti: Physical Education Teacher; Leaders' Corps; Physical 
Education Department Chairman 



Mrs. Patricia Gordon: Earth Science; General Earth Science; Intermediate 

Earth Science 
Mr. Victor Granaudo: Geometry 1 ; Math Analysis; Algebra 11, 12; Honors 

Algebra 2; Matheletes Adviser 
Mrs. Karla Grant: LPVEC Classroom Assistant 
Mrs. Joan Guziec: Accounting 2; Applied Econmoics; Business Law; 

Business Printing and Managing; Business Department Chairperson 
Mr. J. Brian Halloran: Superintendent 



FACULTY 163 



Mr. Daniel Hanscom: U.S. History; News and Views; Our World Our Times 

Dr. Diane Heiney: English 2; Speech Communications 

Mrs. Donna Hick: Special Education Tutor; Hosts' and Hostesses' Club 

Adviser 
Mr. Ronald Hofmann: English 1 , 4; Contemporary Problems; Writing Lab 
Mr. Russell Holt: Trigonometry; Algebra 2; Geometry 1 ; Consumer Math 



Mrs. Diane Jeserski: Key Boarding; Personel Typing; Accounting 1; 

Shorthand; Word Processing 
Mr. Robert Johnson: Principal 
Mr. Marios Kacoyannkis: Guidance Coounselor 
Mr. Bruce Kenney: Honors Physics; Physics; Intermediate Physics 
Mr. Martin Kibbe: Digital Electronics 3; Electronics 1 , 2; Varsity Hockey 

Coach; Class of 1992 Adviser 

Mrs. Terri Kida: LPVEC Classroom Assistant 
Mrs. Janet King: Special Education Tutor 
Mrs. Christine Kirchgessner: Special Education Secretary 
Mr. Robert Kirschling: Guidance Counselor 

Mrs. Susan Kline: AP English 3; English 2; NEASC Evaluation Co- 
Chairperson 



Mr. William Kober: Driver Education; Athletic Director; Intramurals 
Mrs. Gloria Laflamme: Spanish 1,2,3; French 3 
Mr. Alexander Lagunowich: Honors Biology; Biology 
Mrs. Carolyn Lambert: LPVEC Head Teacher 

Mrs. Raffelena Latino: English 1, 4; American Idealism and Realism; 
Emeralds Adviser 



Mr. David Lavin: Wood Working; Small Building Technology; Metal Working; 

Power Mechanics 
Ms. Sheila Lewis: LPVEC Classroom Assistant 
Mrs. Carol Ligarski: Computer Lab; Computer Programming; Honors 

Computers; Computer Literature; Computer Department Chairperson; 

Computer Club Adviser 
Mrs. MaryAnn Little: Swithboard Receptionist 
Mr. John Logan: Assistant Principal 






164 FACULTY 




Mrs. Beverly MacCauley: Superintendent's Office Secretary/Receptionist 

Mrs. Catherine Maleckas: Principal's Office Secretary 

Ms. Mary Mariani: Superintendent's Office Payroll Clerk 

Ms. Nadine Marvici: Media Aide 

Mr. Robert McCarthy: French 1,2,3, 4, 5; French Exchange Program 



Mrs. Patricia McDiarmid: Health; Boys' and Girls' Swimming Coach 
Mrs. Michelle McMahon: Spanish 1, 2, 3; Computer Education 
Mrs. Corinne Mercier: Superintendent's Office Secretary 
Mr. Harold Miller: General Physiology and Anatomy; General Biology; 

Human Physiology; HCV Girls' Track and Cross Country 
Mr. William Mitchell: LPVEC Head Teacher 



Mr. Russell Mooney: Special Education Counselor; Varsity Lacross Coach 

Mrs. Sallie Moore: Superintendent's Office 

Mr. John Morrissey: English 1 , 2; Writing Lab 

Mrs. Kathleen Mosellen: Child Study 1,2,3 

Mr. Byron Musselman: English 1 ; English Literature; Writing Lab 



Ms. Katherine Niedel: LPVEC Vocational Counselor 
Mrs. Martha Niziolek: Athletic Director Secretary 
Mrs. Sandra Noble: Art 1, 2 
Mrs. Paula Noonan: LPVEC Head Teacher 

Mrs. Rosemary Notarangelo: Nursery; Child Study 1, 2, 3; Life Education; 
Child Growth 



Mrs. Donna O'Connor: SAT/PSAT Prep.; Contemporary Problems; Reading 

Skills; Reading; English Department Chairperson 
Ms. Clare O'Neil: Guidance Counselor 

Mr. Thomas Orszulak: Special Education Psychologist; Photo Club Adviser 
Mrs. Patricia Osmond: Media Aide 
Mrs. Pamela Pease: LPVEC Classroom Assistant 



OUTSIDE LIFE 



Do teachers have a life? One outside of school activities. 



Yes, teachers do have a life outside 
of school. So what if their free time 
is spent with other teachers. 
Racquetball, accidents, trips, and summer 
bring fun (yes fun), into the boring lives of 
teachers. 

Mr. Bernstein and Mr. Silva played 
racquetball over the year. So did Mr. 
Tipaldi. Last year at the Senior Banquet at 
High Meadows, Mr. Bernstein threw a 
water balloon for Mr. Silva to catch, 
which he didn't. Mr. Silva was asked if he 
had an "accident" all day. 



This summer, Mr. Hanscom, Mr. 
Girotti, Mr. Barrett, Mr. DeWolf, Mr. 
Scharl, and Mr. Kibbe spent four days on 
Mr. Kibbe's boat. They left from Old 
Lime, Conn, and went on to New York, 
from there they followed the Hudson 
River. Lastly they cruised around Lake 
Champlain and returned via automobile. 

Mr. DeWolf, Mr. Scharl, Mr. 
Lagunowich, Mr. Gartner and two friends 
took a trip to Baxter Peak at Mt. 
Katahdin. 

Teachers can have fun. 



WHILE on a trip at Baxter Peak at Mt. Katahdin, Mr. 
(Gartner, Mr. Lagunowich, Mr. DeWolf, Mr. Scharl, and 
:wo friends take time out to freeze for a picture. Note 
iie camera on Mr. Lagunowich. 



SUITING (JP to go parasailing, Mr. Kibbe goes 
over the edge. 



THINKING THEY ARE Captain Kirk and Mr. 
Spock of the Star Ship Enterprise, Mr. Kibbe and Mr. 
Girotti, steer Mr. Kibbe's boat around the shores of Old 
Lime. 





|Jfc 



FACULTY 165 



_ 



Mr. Gary Petzold: General Earth Science; Earth Science; Director of Student 
Activities; Class of 1991 Adviser; Business Adviser Smoke Signal; 
Student Government Adviser 

Ms. Patricia Polchlopek: Physical Education Teacher 

Mrs. Katherine Polga: Career Center 

Mrs. Nancy Porter: Secretary to Administrative Assistant 

Mr. John Pryzbylowicz: Spanish 1, 2, 3; French 2 

Ms. Mindy Quackenbush: Physical Education Teacher for LPVEC 

Mrs. Elizabeth Radwilowicz: Chemistry 

Mrs. Joan Riel: Secretary to the Superintendent 

Ms. Margaret Robinson: Art 1 , 2, 3, 4; Art Department Chairperson 

Ms. Diana Rooney: Advanced Keyboarding; Personal Typing 



Dr. Joyce Sager: Spanish 2, 3, 4; Student Publication; Yearbook Business 

and Editorial Adviser 
Mrs. Sandra Sanders: Secretary to the Assistant Principal 
Ms. Jeanne Sauve: Computer Services Director 
Mr. Stephen Scharl: Media Services Chairman 
Mr. Richard Scott: Industrial Technology 



Mr. Frank Sersanti: English 1 ; Writing Lab; Americaan Idealism and 
Realism; Survey of American Literature; Chess Team Adviser 

Mrs. Constance Shea: Geography Studies; World History; World Geography; 
Modern World History; Model U.N. Adviser 

Mrs. Florence Sheehan: Tutor 

Mrs. Carol Sibilia: Secretary to the Principal 

Mr. Robert Silva: Algebra 1, 2; Geometry 1; Math 10; Algebra 12 




OUR FAVORITES 



We all have our favorite teachers who make school a little less boring, its 
about time they got some credit. 



Even though, to most of us school 
is boring, there are those rare 
classes that we look forward to, 
the ones that have the teachers who have 
a sense of humor, who make us want to 
learn, and who become our friends. School 
is supposed to prepare you for college, and 
college for the real world. Not many 
people remember what they learned, but 
they do remember the experience. Junior 
Matt Casey says, "My favorite class is 
American Idealism and Realism because 
Mr. Tipaldi has a line for everything." On 
Halloween Mr. Tipaldi dressed up as 
"Tony Fazule." Tony was an abnoxious 
Italian singer whose shirt smelled. 

Many students agree that Mr. Silva 
actually makes math, geometry, and alge- 
bra fun. Who would have thought, math 
class fun? Freshman Rosemary Kirk says, 
"I only had him for a little while but he's 
really funny. He has a sense of humor." 
Perkins and Bridget Baron, 
Ir. S. for three years in a row. 
Kara adn he hasn't gotten sick of him 
yet. Mr. S has also been said to resem- 



ble a certain cartoon character by the 
name of Fred. 

Mr. Hanscom and Ms. Brewer, two of 
the junior/senior history teachers, seem to 
wake people up, wake them up to a world 
they never knew about. And they do it 
very well. 

The yearbook staff has polled each class 
and found: 

Senior class favorite: Mr. Dan 
Hanscom 

Junior class favorite: Mrs. Patricia 
Polchlopek with Mr. Bob Silva at a close 
second 

Sophomore class favorite: Mr. Jay 
Deely 

Freshman class favorite: Mr. Curt 
Wing 

These teachers are not the only ones 
who deserve recognition. There are many 
others that are great teachers. But there 
isn't enough room, so to all of you we have 
missed You're doing a great job! 




SHOCKED that she was picked favorite teac 
by the junior class Ms. Polchlopek stands in awe. 



166 FACULTY 




Mrs. Barbara Sirois: AP Calculus; Geometry 1 , 2; Algebra 1 1 ; Basic 

Trigonometry 
Ms. MaryLou Sitnik: Food Technology; Home Economics Department 

Chairperson; National Honors Society Adviser 
Mrs. Rita Southworth: Secretary to the English Department 
Mr. Richard Spencer: English 1 ; Advanced Writing; Writing Lab 
Mr. Karl Sternberg: Chemistry; Intermediate Chemistry 

Ms. Cynthia Stirton: Secretary Superintendent's Office 

Ms. Lynn Sullivan: Special Education Interpreter and Sign Language 

Mr. Arthur Tipaldi: American Idealism and Realism; Speech 

Communications; Writing Lab; HCV Girls' Softball and Boys' Soccer 
Mrs. Ann Tousignant: Career Center 
Mr. J. Michael Trebbe: Business Manager 



Mr. Gregory Trimmer: Advanced Writing; English 2: Man and his 

Environment; Smoke Signal Adviser 
Mrs. Kimberly Vardakis: LPVEC Individual Aide 
Mrs. Sonya Vickers: Biology; Intermediate Biology 
Mr. Andrew Whalen: First Aide; Administrative Assistant; Physical 

Education Teacher 
Mrs. Constance White: Special Education Tutor 

Mr. Curtis Wing: Intermediate Earth Science; Honors Earth Science 

Mrs. Jeanne Wolford: Nurse 

Mr. John Worthley: Algebra 12, 1; Geometry 2; Trigonometry; Math 

Analysis 
Ms. Christine Wrona: American History; U.S. History; Promise of America 
Mrs. AnneMarie Zanfagna: Special Education Aide; Adjustment Counselor; 

Communications Training; Peer Mediation; Ham Radio Club Workshop; 

Outing Club Adviser 




AFETERIA STAFF: Shirley Bready, Carol Sweeney, Gayle Whitehill; Betty Swope, Barbara EVENING CUSTODIAL STAFF. Front Row: Dick 
Trombley, Angie Leone, Mary Arabik; Mary King, Joan Thayer, Connie Silveira, Debbie Andre, MaryJo Hebert; Ross, Jr., John Bowen, Eddie Lewicki 
Sutler, Loraine Morell, Mary Norowski, Darlene not pictured: Agnes O'Neil. Back Row: Joe Gauthier, George Stocks, Joe Norman. 




DAYTIME CUSTODIAL STAFF:Walter Ross, Richard Ross, Larry Moriarty, and Ray Dion. 



FACULTY 167 



FORMER LPVEC student 
Jason Constantine and student 
Lisa Gauthier perform a talent 
routine at the (Jnico sponsored 
talent show. 

LPVEC classes enjoy a 
warm fall day taking a walk at 
Echo Hill Farm in Wilbraham 
on one of their many educa- 
tional field trips. 





/*> 




&h :•■ iyjm - ^'^zmmtsm I 



A TERRIFIC COMBO 



Students in the 
Lower Pioneer 
Valley Education- 
al Collaborative program 
love being at Minne- 
chaug. Lisa Gauthier 
says, "The kids are really 
cool." Russell St. Pierre, 
says, "The students al- 
ways say hi to me in the 
halls." Lauren Wil- 
loughby, says that she 
likes to spend time with 
student aides who volun- 
teer their time in the 
classes. Student aide Jen- 
nifer Lucarelle says, "I 
look forward to the time I 
spend with LPVEC stu- 
dents." 

Minnechaug and 
LPVEC make a terrific 



combination. Bill Mitch- 
ell, teacher in the most 
recent class to come to 
Minnechaug, says he 
can't believe how helpful 
students and staff are. 

Students combine 
learning with work exper- 
ience. Charrice Goodrich 
works at the Big Y, Wil- 
braham Library, and 
Eastfield Mall. Tom Gil- 
bert works at the Library 
in Wilbraham. 

LPVEC is not all work 
and no play. Student Erik 
Nelson says his favorite 
part of LPVEC was the 
field trip to New York 
City. Students also enjoy 
attending dances spon- 
sored by Unico. 







A PROUD Patrick Hurst dis- 
plays the uniform he used to 
compete in the Special Olym- 
pics. 




168 LPVEC 



mum 




•ENIOR Keely Fitzgerald dent. Keely commented that 

:cently worked at a summer "This was the greatest exper- 

3mp as an individual aide to ience of my life." 
Hison Laramus, a LPVEC stu- 



LPVEC 169 




170 COMMUNITY DIVIDER 



_ ate on a Sunday 
night. Mr. and Mrs. 
Maltby put the finish- 
ing touches on the faculty pic- 
ture board for the 1990 
NEASC evaluation. Mr. and 
Mrs. Maltby. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ligarski. and Mr. and Mrs. 
Sager spent the evening com 



posing the picture boai 
which was a tremendous h 
to the evaluation committ 
Minnechaug received many ; 
colades by the committi 
thanks to the involvement a 
help from the local comrr 
nity. 





SURROUNDED BY ALL 




" 


tat ith the economy so bad 

w 

It was more difficult to sell an ad 


^Hbh^||H 




l;:;;;^, ^ 1 


Soon it was learned that this was no trend 




■K^BM 


Businesses simply had no money to spend. 




HnBIBI 


■j- oyal patrons gave no reason to doubt 
"^-^ They were still very happy to help out 










They helped supply the money it took 






To develop and put forth this yearbook. 






-|- t ampden and Wilbraham, two small cities 

Led by strong-willed and involved communities 










Men and women of every sort 






Gave Minnechaug their undying support. 






f-|-i heir attendance at each community event 
Showed how much the school meant 










Residents in both towns answered the call 




^BBH| 


Showing that Minnechaug was SURROUNDED BY ALL. 










IBH ^fl ^^ 







COMMUNITY DIVIDER 171 



O'CONNORS 



Congratulations Class Of 1991 

COMPLETE 

AUTO REPAIR 

FACILITY 



New And Used Auto Parts 



• Front End Repairs 

• Exhaust System 

• Tune Up 

• Tire & Balancing 

• Shocks 

• Batteries 

• 4 Wheel Drive Repairs 

• Domestic & Foreign Cars 
Repaired 

• Carwash 






O'CONNORS 



GOOD YEAR 



TIRE & AUTO 



2821 Boston Rd., Wilbraham 
596-8101 



l'i li'llHimWIHIiHBM 



172 COMMUNITY 



H|| 




Keep reaching for those 
stars! 

Love, 
Mom, Dad, Mike, and 
Melissa 



Best Wishes 
To 
Class Of "91 



/ r 



HOME MECHANICAL INSPECTIONS 

By 
Joseph A. Bottone 

General Contractor 
525-2252 



Residential 



Commercial 



DCISEL, MURPHY AND 
FENNEL, P.C. 



SUITE 400 
101 STATE STREET 

SPRINGFIELD, 

MASSACHUSETTS 

01101-2006 

TELEPHONE (413) 732-2147 



VILLAGE 
FOOD MART 

43 Somers Road 

Hampden, MA 

566-8717 

USDA Choice Beef 

Fresh Fish 

Fresh Produce 

Hours: Monday, Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

and Saturday, 9:00-6:00 

Thursday and Friday, 9:00- 

7:00 

Sunday, 10:00-1:00 



There is no limit to the goals you can attain, 
the success you can achieve — your possibili- 
ties are as endless as your dreams. 

Thank you for the love you brought to our 
'ives, the laughter you brought to our hearts. 
Tie pride you brought to our family and even 
he grey hairs you brought to our heads. 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 





Tim, may the wind always be at your back! 
Love, Mom, Bob, and Ryan 



"ACE IS THE 

PLACE 

WITH THE 

HELPFUL 

HARDWARE 

MAN" 

HAMPDEN HARDWARE 
INC. 

480 Main Street 
Hampden, MA 01036 

ACE 
HARDWARE 



COMMUNITY 173 



Wasn't It 
Yesterday 




When They 
Were Small? 





Donna Burnette Interiors 

2141 Boston Road - Eastwood Shops 

Wilbraham, MA (413) 596-5546 



MINNECHAUG EDUCATION 
ASSOCIATION 

Congratulates The Class Of 1991 
And Wishes Them Continued Success! 



174 COMM 





555 WORTHINGTON ST. 
SPRINGFIELD 

CONSISTENTLY ENJOYABLE 

ITALIAN & AMERICAN 

CUISINE 

OPEN DAILY 11 AM- 11 PM 



736-0887 . 736-9433 



Congratulations Diama 



And 
Class Of 91 



COMMUNITY 175 



BIGGER AND... ^ ^ ^ 

get***' 

Chevrolet • Oldsmobile • Geo • Honda 

Hyundai • Mitsubishi • Chrysler • Plymouth 

BMW • Volkswagen 




SULLIVAN 

Hairstylist 



BRONSON TERRACE 
7 8 8 » 4 7 8 




where 'er I will, 
•born music still" 
»m and Dad 



/ 




> 



£■&*■■ 




^ k 



"Follow your dream take one step at a 

time and don't settle for less, just continue 
to climb." -Bradley 

Love you. Mom and David 



i£i 5{o <Sklne<iz Restaurant 



& 



!hs^ <-W A-3Zr 



Gourmet specialized in 
Szechuan Cuisine & 
Vegetarian Cuisine 

2133 Boston Road, 
Wilbraham, MA., 01095 
Tel: (413) 596-8888 





GOOD LUCK MANDY! 

We love you 

Mom and Mario 



Mario fernandez, M.D., P.C. 

Ear. nose & Throat 

head and neck. facial reconstructive surgerv 

Allergy treatment 



dll BELMONT AVENUE 
SPRINGFIELD. MASS 01108 



TELEPHONE 

(413) 736-7291 




We Love You, 

Mom and Dad 



176 COMMUNITY 



Gremers 






amik ot 
PHOTOGRAPHERS 



Best Wishes For Success And Happiness 
In The Future To The Class of 1991 




850 High Street. Holyoke. Mass. 01040 
127 Mill Street, Springfield. Mass. 01 108 



Dan, Larry, Chris 
Marc, Lisa 



Official 1991 
Class Photographers 



COMMUNITY 177 











We 

think 

your past 

is worth 

looking 

into... 

JOSTENS 

the yearbook company 






* 





SPECTACLE 

SHOPPE 
Of 

Wilbraham 

Robin S. Odentz 
Registered Optician 



FINE QUALITY AND 
HIGH FASHION EYEWARE 

Crane Park 
Wilbraham, MA 01095 
-8363 




Congratulations Scott and all our 

love always. 

Mom, Dad, Keith, Bryan, and Evan 




Amy, 

Believe in your dreams. Believe in yourself 
for there is a wonderful tomorrow just wait- 
ing for you. 

We love you and are very proud of you. 
Love Mom, Dad, and Shaw 



RAY TROMBLEY 
ASSOCIATES 

Insurance 

Pensions 

Tax Planning 

Wilbraham Shops 
Wilbraham, MA 

Tel. 413 • 596 • 6992 



Garage Doors By: 

SERVICE 
DOOR 

AND WINDOW CO., INC. 



WILLIAM A. PERKINS, 
JR. 

President 

186 Stafford Street 

Springfield, MA 01104 

(413) 737-4115 



178 COMMl 



Sampson Family 

Serving Greater Springfield 

Since 1880 

21 Tinkham Road 730 State St 

Springfield Springfield 

782-5226 732-5511 

710 Liberty St 
Springfield 

733-1720 

FUNERAL SERVICES 

Pres. 

JOHN H. SAMPSON 



COMMUNITY 179 





Congratulations and love 
Mom, Dad, Janet, Nancy, 
Gary, Glenna, and Sally 



MR. JOHN'S HAIRSTYLES 
JOHN, JAN & MARY 



"THE WILBRAHAM 

SHOPS" 

2341 BOSTON ROAD 

WILBRAHAM, MA 01095 

(413) 596-8144 



RofflER 



'Barber And Hair Stylist' 




ELAINE R. KORHONEN 

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT 



2341 BOSTON ROAD 
WILBRAHAM, MA 01095 



TELEPHONE 
413-596-4645 



SPRINGFIELD DIAGNOSTICS 
AND REHABILITATION 



tit 



275 BICENTENNIAL HIGHWAY 

SPRINGFIELD, MA 01118 

(413) 782-8787 

DR. JOSEPH M. BOYLE D.C. . D.A.B.C.N. 

DR. MICHAEL E. NICARETTA D.C. 

DR. RICK C. CUOMO D.C. 

LISA A. MILLETT R.P.T. 




Whip's 



SPORTING GOODS 



463 BRECKWOOD BLVD 
SPRINGFIELD, MA 01119 



TEAM UNIFORMS 
JACKETS 
EQUIPMENT 
SCREENPRINTING HATS 
SHIRTS 
JACKETS 















iHsM 








JJau 






iaLp*3 








ji 


L '" j 




Congratulations Susan! 


iest of luck 


for a Happy and Successful Future 


to you and your friends 





Q/zeeri^aM&u^ 



PHONE 566-3348 

BRUCE F. HOBAICA B.S., REG. PH. 

10 ALLEN ST. HAMPDEN, MA 



Your Community Pharmacy 



SUBURBAN FORESTRY 
SERVICE 



LONG & SWAIN ASSOCIATES 
Complete Tree Care 



P.O. BOX 745 
WILBRAHAM, MA 01095 



PHONE 596-6450 



180 COMMUNITY 



■■ 



Cottgta&taftoiil Tc The, OUk Of 

1991 

KEVIN L. TROMBLY, D.M.D. 

PRACTICE LIMITED TO ORAL AND 
MAXILLO - FACIAL SURGERY 

1 5 75 WILBRAHAM ROA D 

SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 01179 

TELEPHONE (413) 783-2582 



H.J. ROONEY 
& SONS, INC. 

221 Stafford Street 

Springfield, MA 

01104 





V 



* 



Dear Sue, 

Congratulations to our sweet girl! We hope 

all your dreams come true! 

Love, Mom, Dad, and Pam 



Where 

have 

all 

the 

years 

gone? 

Love, Mrs. 
in »> 




(413)783-0282 
(413)783-0283 



MANDARIN 

Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge 

Szechuan, Cantonese, & Polynesian 

Luncheons, Dinners, Take-out Service 

Sunday Brunch 11:30 A.M.- 3:00 P.M. 

Complete Banquet Facilities 

Open Daily 11:30 A.M.- 10:00 P.M. 

Friday and Saturday until 12:00 A.M. 

Cocktail Lounge Dailv until 12:00 

A.M. 

1177 Boston Road 

Springfield, MA 01119 



THE WILBRAHAM 

INSURANCE 

AGENCY, INC. 

2341 Boston Rd. 
Wilbraham, MA 01095 

596-3753 



COMMUNITY 181 



HAMPDEN BUILDERS 

AND 
DESIGNERS INC. 

520 No. Main St. 
E. Longmeadow, MA 

737-9807 




Mokie, 

You are, and always will be the son- 
shine of my life. 
Love, Moker 



PEN INSURANCE 
AGENCY 

Home • Auto 
Business • Life 

153 Grove St. 

Chicopee, MA 

592-4666 

JOHN P. PENSO 



■ 



R. M. 
GALLIVAN 

& 
COMPANY 

REAL ESTATE CONSULTANTS 



28 SOMERS ROAD 

HAMPDEN, MA 01036 

566-8006 



tlbraliatn 



L 



■ZJrue Value hardware 



STORE 
(4131 596 8073 

2701 BOSTON ROAD 
WILBRAHAM. MASSACHUSETTS 01095 




KEYS MADE 

GLASS CUT 

SCREENS REPAIRED 

MOWER TUNE-UPS 



WINDOW SHADES 
TRU-TEST PAINT 

SHARPENING 
LAMPS REWIRED 




Congratulations 

Fer-Fer 

You Did It! 

Love Mom, Dad, & Higs too! 



VILLAGE FOOD MART 

43 Somers Road 
Hampden, MA 

566-8717 



CJSDA CHOICE BEEF 

FRESH FISH 

FRESH PRODCICE 



Hours: Mon, Tues, Wed. & Sat 9-6, Thurs & 
Fri 9-7, Sun 10-1 



*J — „ ,_ gg 




Congratulations Brian, 

We love you. 

Mom, Dad, Billy & Debbie 



182 L 



■■■ 



Peter B. Vinson, CLU, ChFC 

and 
Associates 

One Monarch Place 

P.O. Box 2314 

Springfield, Massachusetts 01101 

(413)781-6964 



Variable Life Insurance - Disability Insurance 

Annuities - Investments 



MONARCH 




COMMUNITY 183 



ni 



PRE-DESIGN 

Building Systems, Inc. 




William D. Crocker 

186 Stafford Street 

Springfield, MA 

1 104 

413-737-7803 




It's time to move on to the big pool, 

Sara! Good luck. 

Love, Mom, Dad, & Cassie 



Congratulations 
Graduates 

From 

GEORGE F. VITEK, M.D. 
KATHRYX 0. LIMMER, M.D. 

PEDIATRIC AND ADOLESCENT MEDICINE 
OFFICE HOURS BY APPOINTMENT 



2341 BOSTON ROAD 

WILBRAHAM. MA 01095 (413) 599-1201 





fHi 


A. BOILARD SONS, INC. 




LUMBER AND BUILDING SUPPLIES 

476 Oak Street 

Indian Orchard, Ma 01151 

TELEPHONE 
(413) 543-4100 



THE WILBRAHAM 
VILLAGE STORE 

Congratulates 

The Class Of '91 

Purveyors of fine foods and 
wines 

(4 13) 596-3900 

462 Main Street 

Wilbraham, Ma 01095 

STUART AND BETSY 
LUDLOW JOHNSON 



W.F. 
LOGAN 

Insurance 
Agency, Inc. 

A Full Service Agency 
Since 1912 

The Wilbraham Shops 
Boston Road 

596-6161 




Good luck John 

Love, 

Dad, Mom, and Meghan 



184 COMMUNITY 



Heating, Air Conditioning 
and ventilation Systems 



Carrier 



Hurley & Da vid 

Engineers, Contractors, Sales, Installation, 
Service, Maintenance Contracts 



Donald C. Tucker, Pres. 



Our Business is 

Heating and Cooling 

Your Business , M „.„.. 

732-3141 



90 RSK AVENUE, SPRINGFIELD, MA 01107 



COMMUNITY 185 




Congratulations 

Kristen! 

Love 

Dad, Mom, Rick, and Bill 



ACRES 
NEWSTAND 



1924 Wilbraham Rd. 
Springfield, MA 

Newspapers 

Greeting Cards 

Lottery 

Magazines 



Best Wishes From 




Scott. 

Congratulations, you made it. May the path 
you choose be filled with happiness, 
m and Carrie 



BD MINUTE 
PHOTO 





Hope Your Future 
"Develops" Nicely 



UNITED 

Driving School 



413/583-2775 

81 East Street 
Ludlow, MA 01056 




Thumbs up, Roger! 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Ange and Eric 



186 COMMUNITY 




CANDY, 

It's more than what you've done that 
makes us proud It's who you are, Con- 

gratulations 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 



MALL 
BARBER 
SERVICE 




HAIR CARE 

FOR THE 

ENTIRE FAMILY 

543-1738 

Eastfield Mall, Spfld. 

No Waiting 
SIX BARBER STYLISTS 



u 
n 



The Hanson Group, Ltd. 

Congra tula tes 

The Class Of 

1991 




THE SKY'S THE LIMIT, JIM 



Congratulations and lots of love. 
Mom, Dad, Tom and Lauren 




Quality Dry Cleaning 

Shm Laundering ana 

Tailoring 



THE SUPERIOR CLEANER 



Haymarket Square 

1732 Boslon Rd 

Springfield, MA oi '29 



BLOMBERG ENTERPRISES. INC 
BoD ■ Karen • Mike - Demse 

(4 13) 543-4400 



Eastfi eld Mall 



Merchants association 



Best Wishes 
Class Of 1991 



COMMUNITY 187 




"We wish for you to be happy, and to reach 
for the best for what is happiness if not 
to believe in and follow one's dream." 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Kim, Tracy 



2W* 



Telephone: 782-9169 

459 Breckwood Blvd. 

Breckwood Shoppes 

Springfield, MA 01109 

Workboots 
running-walking 
basketball-tennis 
soccer-aerobics 

Quality Footwear 
Men, Women, Children, Infants 




ADIOS AM1GOS 
'The Meisner Boys" 



LOUIE'S 

RESTAURANT 



Village of Hampden 

548 Main Street 

Hampden, MA 01036 



(413) 566-8331 



Carol Hayward 




Dear Jenny, 

Thank you for brightening 

our lives with your 

presence this year. 

All our love, 

Mom, Dad, and the boys 



New England's 
Dealer 




188 COMMUNITY 



Once upon a time some 18 years ago, we were 
given a princess. She was a sensitive, sweet happy 
child, wise for her years, spreading sunshine, 
books and dolls throughout the house. A serious 
love and respect for nature and animals was appar- 
ent at a tender age. 

As she grows, it becomes obvious, she is a giver 
of music, laughter and love to life. She is teaching 
us so much about family, friendship, trust and 
honesty and her love will always fill the corners of 
our hearts. 

For your being we thank God, you are a cher- 
ished joy beyond words. We thank you for the 
pleasure of your company, and are sincerely grate- 
ful to all your teachers and friends from whom you 
have learned. 

Our best to you always. 
Mom, Dad and Brother 








1359 Wilbraham Road 
Springfield, Massachusetts 01119 

GARDEN SUPPLIES 
NURSERY STOCK 

FLORIST 
CHRISTMAS SHOP 

Telephone (413) 783-5883 783-0521 

John S. Bordenuk 
President 




You've always been headed in the 
right direction, Bub! 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, and Jeff 



SO) A & SOJA 

ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW 

JOHN F. SOJA 



2022 Boston Road 

Wilbraham, MA 01095 

TEL: (413) 543-3820 

FAX: (413) 543-3825 



COMMUNITIES 1 89 




Good Luck to Nicole and 
The Class of 1991 

Love, her parents 

Christopher, Viktoria, Tim, 

Kellie, Aaron, Babci, and Dziadzk 




WEDDING 
SPECIALTY 
CAKES 

BREAD, ROLLS 
PASTRY 




CHMURA'S 8AKSRY, INC. 



SPECIALIZING IN ALL NATURAL 
SOUR DOUGH RYE BREAD 



12 Pulaski Street Telephone 

Indian Orchard, MA 543-2521 



I AYLOR RENTAL 

1997 Boston Rd. 
Wilbraham, MA 01095 
(413) 543-4255 
store hours: MON. 7:30-5:30 

TUES.-SAT. 8:00-5:30 



Rent quality products 

for all your Special Events, 

Parties and Meetings: 



Tents and Canopies 
Tables and Chairs 
Dishes and Glasses 
Silver Services 
Chafing dishes 
Candelabras 
Coffee Makers 
Wedding Accessories 
Dance floors 
Portable bars 
Barbeque grills 
Concession equipment 



Service, Selection, Satisfaction! 



We 're more than just 
products at work. 




Fly high Precious One. Soar with 
the eagles knowing that we will al- 
ways be here for you, and remem- 
bering that there is no failure in fall- 
ing, only in never reaching for the 
stars. 

MOM, DAD, NIKKI, 

DANNY, & STEVE 



SPECIAL TAKE OUT MEALS 

LEONE'S PIZZA 
And More 



SKA WILBRAHAM RD 
SPFLD. MA 01129 

783-4363 



Free Delivery to Wilbrahan 
And Parts of Hampden 



FOR TAKE OUT 8, DELIVERY 
CALL AHEAD 




WILBRAHAM 

BARBER 

SHOP 

Springfield Street 

Wilbraham 
Mon., Tue. Fri., 9-6 
Thurs. 9-8, Sat. 9-5 

596-8870 

Greg Lockhart 

Proprietor 




Congratulations, Norma! 

We've always been proud of you and we 
know what you are capable of. Now it's 
time to show the world. 

Good luck forever. Love from. 
Your Family 



190 COMMUNITY 




s 



New England Pnimotional Marketing 



'At New England Promotional Marketing, Your Success is Our Business!' 

2 Allen Street, Hampden, MA 01036 

413-566-2141 fax 413-566-2218 toll free 800-334-1206 



Western New England 

Kathy Selvia 

Sue Carrion 

Sue Maki 

Dick Gagne 

Lucille Morris 
Eastern New England 

Clyde Wilber 

Bill Ellery 

Bill Baldwin 

Susie Crocker 
Fund Raising Division 

Maureen Grenier 




t« « ■ w • * * ' 1"* 



We love you, Kara 

Mom, Dad and Jackie 



We Have The Perfect Idea For: 

Sales Meetings 

Thank You's 

Sales Awards 

Grand Openings 

Anniversaries 

Conventions 

Sales Incentives 

Safety Programs 

Open House 

Mail Enclosures 

Gift Programs 

Birthday Programs 

Sales Contests 

Political Campaigns 

Fund Raising 

New Product Introductions 

Attention Getters 

Employee Recognition 




Ambi, 

May you continue to grow in the 
wisdom of the Lord. 
We love you so. 

Mom, Dad, Jamie, Tiffany, 
Whitney 
I Cor. 1:18-25 




See Your Helpful Hardware Man At 

Hampden 
Hardware 




480 MAIN ST. HAMPDEN. MA 
(413) 566-8118 




Pookie, 

Congratulations. You did it! And 
you thought holding a bird was an 
accomplishment! 
Love, 
Dad, Mom, George, Beasley, 
and M.G. 



COMMUNITY 19! 



ESI 




«&* 



Good Luck Stevie 
Love, Mom and Dad 



"PCjfZ 7>4& & 7R&tf<ZU>l4*tt 




BREAKFAST 

LUNCHEON SPECIALS 

ITALIAN DINNERS 

COCKTAILS 

PIZZA 
GRINDERS 

2391 Boston Rd. 
Wilbraham, MA 

596-6168 
596-8806 
596-3500 

Gregory Barnagian 



■■■i^HMfflsaEffla 




VINNY'S 
CITGO 




To Clay, Who's always been unconvention- 
al but fun! Congratulations and good 
luck. Love, 
Mom, Dad, Curt, Josie, and Don 



WILBRAHAM 



MOVIE STOP 

Congratulations To 
The Class Of 1991 

596-8051 

2797 Boston Road 

WILBRAHAM, MA 01095 




Small things unforgotten 
To recall with a smile 



TRI-TOWN RUBBER, INC 

2694 Boston Road 

No. Wilbraham, MA 01095 

Tel. 596-3886 

Quality 
Service 




Baby face don't grow so fast 

Make a special wish that 

will always last. Rub this 

magic lantern. He will make 

your dreams come true for you 

Love, Mom, Daddy, Karen and Michael 



I92 COMMUNITY 



©Gn)5@Gr ^Qii®tl®|i)Gr§]Cpfrii^ 



Your Senior Portrait is the most important 
photograph you'll ever have taken, 
so don't settle for anything but the best!!! 





Distinctive 
Photography 



257 South Main Street Palmer, Massachusetts 01069 

283-9341 




You will be photographed by 

one of the nation's top portrait photographers, 

known for her many awards and recognitions. 

At Duval's you can count on the BEST 

in Senior photography. 



COMMUNITY 193 




ORR 





i 



CADILLAOPONTIAC 

Where Personal Attention and Expert Service Make the Difference. 



10 Mill St., Springfield, MA. 



781-1677 



194 COMMUNITY 



Best Wishes 

For Success 

In The Future 

ROBERT L. 
HOWARTH 



State Representative 
13th Hampden District 

Committees: 

INSURANCE 

ETHICS 
JUDICIARY 

Room 473B 
Statehouse 
722-2230 

Residence 
782-4662 




"Our Best To You" Mikey 

Because of you and Mrs. Belltinker there 
will always be a song in our heart and sun- 
shine everywhere. You are on the way to 
making the world better for singing togeth- 
er, just you wait! 
Love, Mom, Dad, W.H.N, and Uncle Bud. 



Flowers With 
A Flair 

Mowers For VI I Occ a sions 



2442 Boston Road 
Wilbranam. MA 
01095 
(413) 596-2291 

Prop. PaW Diotalevi 




\ Ladies Boutique 




Ryan, You have the strength to overcome 
all. Don't ever give up on yourself. We love 
you and will be here for you always 
Mom, Dad, Bob and Buckiss 





Love and Best 

Wishes in the 

Future. 



I^> 



2000 BOSTON ROAD 
WILBRAHAM, MA 

Sunday through Thursday 7 7 a.m. to 7 a.m. 
Friday and Saturday 7 7 a.m. to 2 a.m. 

TAKE OUT ORDERS ACCEPTED: 
543-5032 




Dear Tara 

Hoping Many of Your Dreams 

Come True! 

Congratulations and Lots of Love 

Mom, Dad, Chris, Laureen 



COMMUNITY 195 



re>TW»l 



LANDRY LYONS 

&WHYTE COMPANY 



^Better 

I ■ I JLAand Gardens' 



GOOD 

LUCK 

SENIORS! 




466 Main Street, Wilbraham - 596-6711 




AMBER AND STEVE 
Friends Forever 




Congratulations 
'Your Families" 



Our Special 

Thanks 

To 

LEIF Q. NORDSTROM MD 

KEVIN L. TROMBLY DMD 

GEORGE H. NIESKE DMD 

JOHN R. HENNESSY DMD 





Jenny, 

You had the courage and strength to 
make this school year abroad. We are so 
proud of you. 

Love, 

Mom and Dad in Sweden 




mxm 

TIME FLIES 



**T EAt^ 




GOOD LUCK - PHIL 




Dear Ry, Congratulations on a 
job well done. -Karla 



196 COMMUNITY 



yCCTRU/* CLCCTRDSTATtC 
CQ 




QUALITY REFINTSHING OF METAL FURNITURE 



GOOD LUCK 

AND 
GOD BLESS 




We Are So Proud 
Of You! 



AMERICAN HIGHWAY 
SIGN 

45 Baldwin Street 
Eastlongmeadow, MA 01028 

525-4331 



LARRY A. TREED 
and Associates 

TAX AND FINANCIAL 

PLANNING 



780 Denslow Road 

East Longmeadow 

525-3444 



BEST WISHES 

TO THE 

CLASS OF 

1991 



From 

ATTORHEY 
LISA deSOUSA 





Congratulations Tony! 

Our Love Always 
Mom And Dad 



Hew €ngland 




., , ,, KENNETH LIPITZ 
If 1 SHELLEY ZIEBEL 



Artistic Directors 



tance 
Conservatory 



Joan R. McCann, 
Founder 



143 Shaker Rd. 

E. Longmeadow, MA 

01028 

525-7713 




KEELY AND ANNE - "Friends Forever" 

Love, 
Your Families 



COMMUNITY 197 





















< 


1 


'^''y*% 9V 




I : 


| 


'niinmll 


a 








m 



198 COMMUNITY 



IN CHILD STGDY class John Farrell 
and Becky Person stop while their 
young companions smile for the cam- 
era. 



INDEX 



Adamson, Jason 92 144 
Agnew, Elizabeth 94 13, 156 
Albano, Jon 93 46, 56, 57. 71, 98, 99, 150 
Albano, Krissy 19, 21 
Albano. Roberta 21 
, Albee, Douglas 92 71, 144 
Allard, Cindy 93 43, 150 
Allard, Denise 91 32, 46. 51. 121 
Alquist, Christine 162 
Alves, Diane 19 
Alves, Lucy 93 150 
Alves. Susan 92 144 
Amsden. Kerry 94 76. 77. 90, 91, 156 
Anderson, Cory 92 144 
Anderson, James 91 121 
Anderson. Jeffrey 94 1 56 
Anderson, Jim 14, 44, 45, 74, 120 
Anderson, Lisa 92 10, 42, 43, 104, 144. 150 
Andre. Debbie 167 
Apple. Adam 91 62. 86. 121 
Arabik, Jessie 93 44, 150 
Arabik, Mary 167 

Arnoman, Jenny 91 II, 36, 105. 121. 135 
Arslanian. Candace 91 32. 36. 82. 83. 121 
Aseolillo, Emily 91 121 
Ashwell, Nancy 94 156 
Asmar, Oliver 60 
Umar. Omar 91 70. 71. 121. 140 
Asselin, Michele 92 144 
Atcheson. Lee 91 68, 69, 
Atcheson, Noah 93 150 
Ats, Marilyn 46, 162 
Avery, Amy 94 156 



121 



B 



Babineau, Angela 92 144, 149 
Baer, Chris 32, 68, 69 



Bailev. Deanna 91 121 
Bailey, Keith 91 121 

Balboni. Christopher 92 144 

Balmer. Philip 93 150 

Balscr. Daniel 63. 76, 162 

Balser, Heather 94 156 

Bamford. Donald 48. 162 

Banis, Kathy 162 

Bannon, Anita 162 

Bannon, Rachel 92 85, 144 

Bannon. Rebecca 94 156 

Barber, Amy 91 76, 77, 121, 133 

Barber. Lois 162 

Baron. Bridget 92 36, 46. 66, 102, 106. 107, 144, 166 

Baron. Eric 94 75. 115. 156 

Barrett. Martin 80, 81, 162. 165 

Barry. David 56, 57, 162 

Barton. Teresa 48. 162 

Batista, Mary 92 144 

Beacom. Amy 94 76, 156 

Beacom. Rebecca 92 22, 23, 34, 35, 36, 40, 42, 43, 

48. 51, 56, 105, 117, 144 
Beake, Xenophan 91 14. 121 
Beaupre. Charles 93 69. 150 
Beaupre. Michelle 66 
Beeler. Charles 162 
Belcher. Dave 18 

Belcher, Kandra 92 76. 77, 90, 91, 144, 149 
Belcher, Kristin 94 78, 156 
Belcher. Sharon 94 9. 78. 79. 156. 159 
Belden, Ste>en 91 SI. 56. 57. 121 
H. Ili.i a... Eric 91 121 
Bennett. David 71. 90. 90. 129. 162 
Bennett. Sara 94 85. 156 
Bennett. Todd 72 
Berard. Victor 62 
Berg, Ronnie 93 150 
Bergeron, Joshua 94 156 
Bernard. Ray 93 69, 71, 72, 99, 150 
Bernstein. David 21. 162. 165 
Berte. Anne 91 3. 15, 16, 76. 77, 94, 95, 121, 128 
Bene, Richard 93 52, 74, 75, 86, 87, 150. 151 
Bertelli. Amanda 94 156 
Bertelh. Kellie 94 156 
Bertelli. Kristopher 91 121 
Bidus. Steve 98. 99. 155 
Bienvenue, Connie 162 
Bienvenue. Spence 92 144, 146 
Bigos, Nancv 91 51. 66. 121. 130. 135 
Binns. Ethan 94 72. 156 
Bishop. Brian 91 56. 57. 86. 121. 128. 130 
Bishop, David 93 150 
Bishop. Janet 94 90. 91. 156 
Blair. Shawn 127 



Blascr. Bryan 93 150 

Blaser. Nicky 19 

Bleau. Heath 94 43. 109. 153. 156 

Bleau. Heather 92 44, 110, 144 

Bliss, Tracy 94 38. 156 

Blombcrg, Eileen 56 

Blondek, James 91 1, 9, 92, 93. 123 

Blumc. Emily 94 76. 156 

Bluteau. Nicole 92 27, 28, 36, 37, 48. 84. 144 

Blulcau. Nikki II. 106 

Boduch. Eric 92 32. 51. 62. 75. 144 

Boissonnault. Nicole 92 32. 46, 144 

Bolek. Nicole 91 64, 123 

Bopp. Chris 93 38, 62, 150 

Borsari. Brian 91 36. 37. 41. 48, 49. 50. 51. 56. 57. 

120. 123. 125, 130 
Borsari, Judith 121, 162 
Boss, Susan 107, 146 
Boucher, Donna 162 
Boudrcau. Carrie 92 46, 63, 70, 144 
Boudrcau. Paul 94 156 
Bowcn. John 167 

Bower, Douglas 92 62, 63, 74, 144 
Bradbury, Annie 93 150 
Brady. Bill 93 62. 63. 71. 72, 99. 150. 153 
Brady. Jennifer 94 156 
Brady. Nicole 56 
Brand. Jenny 94 156 
Bransford. Maureen 162 
Bready. Sheri 93 150 
Bready. Shirley 167 
Brescia, Cynthia 92 32, 35, 36, 40. 46. 48. 54. 55. 83, 

14 4 
Brcssettc, Kathy 92 35, 40, 42, 43, 48, 51, 66, 76, 77, 

92 . 93. 144. 145 
Breton. Jennifer 92 10, 42, 43, 104, 144 
Brewer. Mary Lou 24, 34, 162, 166 
Briotta. Michael 91 123 
Brown, Chad 91 16, 58, 86, 87. 120. 123. 130. 131, 

139. 14 2 
Brown. Charles 91 22. 23. 106. 123. 140 
Brown. Heather 91 17. 23. 38. 40. 41. 42. 43. 51. 

106. 123 . 129. 130 
Brown. Hillary 94 23. 38. 41. 80, 81, 90, 91, 156 
Brown, Richard 162 

Brunellc. Angela 93 32, 36. 38. 56. 83, 95, 150, 155 
Brunelle. Eric 93 32. 38. 55. 96, 150 
Brunelle, Roger 91 2. 14. 15. 34, 41, 56. 57, 96, 121, 

122 . 123. 142 
Brunetti, Anthony 94 72, 99, 156 
Bruno, Jason 69 
Brunton 92 144 
Bruscoe, Paris 94 156 
Burger. Ke>in 91 86, 123 
Burger, Todd 92 74. 144 
Burk. Melissa 91 24. 38. 123 
Burk. Wendy 93 23. 32. 56. 150. 154 
Burke. Beverly 92 38. 144 
Burke. Erin 93 32. 63. 83. 90. 91. 150 
Burke. Kelly 91. 91 
Burke. Stephanie 93 44. 63. 83. 150 
Burkins. Jason 161 
Burnett, Ben 93 150 
Burnett, Bradley 91 15. 17. 25. 34. 35, 36. 48. 51. 

123. 138. 142 
Burnelte. Ben 152 
Burr, Jeffrey 94 89, 156 
Butler, Joan 167 



c 



Cadicux, Renee 161 

Cahill, Amy 66 

Callahan. Robin 92 144 

Camerlin. Ryan 94 98. 99. 102. 156 

Camerlin. Tim 91 98, 99. 123. 123 

Campbell, Katharine 94 22. 40. 156 

Campbell. Krislen 91 123 

Campbell. Sean 91 32, 51, 68. 69. 123. 125. 130 

Candage. Jason 94 75. 156 

Candage, Jennifer 91 123 

Cantalini, Joseph 94 156 

Cardarelli, Donna 162 

Carr, Jason 91 60. 86. 123 

Carr, Ronald 91 123 

Carroll, Thomas 94 156 

Carter, Jason 92 98, 99. 144 

Carter. Michael 92 144 

Casagrande. John 92 144 

Cascio. Patricia 95, 96, 162 

Casey. Matthew 92 27. 74. 88. 89. 144, 145, 146 

Castonguay. Stephen 105. 162 

Cavanaugh. Brendan 92 144 

Cavros. Knsten 92 32. 38. 40. 56, 144 146 

Cebula, Tom 86. 87, 206 

Cecchi. Anthony 93 150 

Cerasa. Diama 91 9, 36, 37, 38, 40. 46. 123, 131 

Cesan. Mollv 91 124 

Chaffee, Sage 93 112, 150 

Champigny. Michael 92 144 

Chappel. Loron 94 72. 157 

Charles, Patricia 91 124 

Charles. Sabine 92 144 

Chase. Pamela 92 10. 42. 76, 104, 144 

Chechelte. Steve 92 74. 144 

Chechile, Andrea 91 24. .32. 34. 35. 38. 40. 41 119 

124. 133. 140 
Chiccko, Jennifer 94 85, 157 
Childs. Elizabeth 91 38. 124 
Christofori. Bryan 92 13. 27. 60. 144 
Cirillo, Giovanni 92 68, 69. 144 
Clark. Jamie 46 

Clines. Andrew 92 36. 40. 44. 48. 62. 144 
Colclough. George 94 72. 89. 157 
Colclough, Heather 92 9. 66. 67. 83. 95, 145 
Collier. Cathleen 91 51. 124 
Collins. Maureen 162 
Condon. Jennifer 94 157 
Connell. Ben 68, 69 
Connell. Jaime 60 
Connery. Shawn 93 150 
Constantine. Jason 168 
Cook. Tricia 93 150 
Coppola. Evan 94 22, 23, 96, 157 
Cordi. Tina 94 157 
Cormier. Janice 162 
Corrieri. AnnMarie 162 
Cote. Christina 94 157 
Coupal. Colleen 91 124 
Courtney. John 56, 57 
Courtney, Marie 92 46, 145 





RETIRING nurse Jeanne Wolford 
talks with a reporter from Channel 40 who 
was doing an interview with students who 
smoke on National Smoke-Out Day. 

KIM FORRANT gets ready to eat her 
lunch. Aside from the regular lunch, stu- 
dents have a choice of salad bar or a la 
carte. 



INDEX 199 



Courtney. Thomas 93 56. 57. 99. 150 

Couture. Colclle 93 9. 56, 150 

Cowee. Jim 60 

Cowles. Robert 93 11. 150 

Coyle. Shawn 92 145 

Crafts. Julie 19 

Crafts. Lvnn 19 

Crawford. Bob 89 

Cnstofori. Bryan 1 16 

Crivelli. Katherine 93 150, 155 

Crivelli, Stephanie 19 

Crocker. Bill 18 

Crocker, Seth 94 157 

Cronin. Lianne 93 76, 77, 150 

Croteau. Scolt 91 124 

Croteau, Steven 91 70, 71, 124 

Crum, Lisa 83 

Cubin. Ryan 94 99, 157 

Currier. Amy 93 9, 10, 32. 36. 40, 66. 76. 150 

Currier. Stacy 92 145 

Cw'iok, Eric 94 157 



D 



D'Amalo. Edward 92 44. 145 

D'Amato. Rebecca 94 85. I 57 

Dalmolin. JoAnne 163 

Dalv, Brendan 91 71, 124 

Daly, Tara 91 15, 16, 32, 36, 40, 78, 79. 124, 130 

Daniele. Christopher 91 124 

Daniele, Margaret 163 

Danker, Christine 163 

Danlhony, Diane 10. 105 

Darcy, Erin 94 157 

Daris. Marcelle 161 

Darvin. John 92 145 

Davenport. John 93 44. 62. 75, 150 

David, Andrea 92 11. 27, 32, 69, 84, 85, 111. 145 

Davidson. Amy 19 

Davis. Joia 94 10. 42. 157 

Day. Heather 93 36, 150 

Dean, Matthew 94 75. 157 

Dean. Melissa 93 150 

Dean. William 92 44. 145 

Decesare, Dana 92 145 

Decoleau. Sherry 92 32, 66, 70. 92, 93, 145 

Deehring. Casey 93 150 

Deelv. John 31, 76, 163. 166 

DeFlono, Michael 93 62. 71. 72. 150 

DeForest. Jim 68. 69 

DeForge, Dena 94 95. 157 

Degray, Eric 93 10, 42, 150 

Degray. Mark 92 145 

Delisle. Jeffrey 94 16. 157. 160 

Delisle. Laurie 92 32, 36. 66, 145 

Demoslhenous, Sarah 91 70, 76, 77, 92, 93, 124 

Dempsey. Maureen 93 32. 38. 66, 80, 81, 150. 207 

DeNucci. Thomas 94 74. 75. 157 

Dernavich, Darrell 94 157 

Derosier, Michelle 93 76, 77, 92, 93, 151 

Desaultelle, Johanna 163 

Deshais. Wendy 93 II, 32, 38, 40, 66, 84, 151 

DeSimone. Elizabeth 163 

Desjardins, Anthony 92 55, 71, 72, 145 

Deslauriers. Paul 163 

Desousa. Trista 92 27, 28. 32, 36, 63. 145 

Devries. Paul 92 145 

DeWolf. James 163. 165 

Difilippo. Michelle 94 157 

Difilippo, Nina 93 36. 151 

Dill, Holly 92 145 

Dill. Ralph 91 14. 71. 124 

Dim. Vesal 94 72. 157 

Dinoia, Norma 91 44, 45, 124 

Dion. Ray 167 

Dolaher. Brian 91 98. 99. 124. 139 

Dolaher. Eric 94 74. 75. 98. 99. 104, 156, 157 

Dolaher, Melissa 93 II, 32, 36, 38, 66. 78, 151, 153, 

154 
Dolan, Diana 92 32, 40, 145. 148 
Dolben, Molly 94 157 
Donnelly. Patricia 163 
Donnelly, Sandra 92 I I, 32, 36, 56, 84, 145 
Donovan. Jarrod 94 157 
Donovan, Michael 91 98, 99, 124 
Donovan. Patricia 163 
Dowd. Peter 92 46. 7J. 72, 145 
Dowling, Kerri 92 117, 145 
Draper, Jeremy 91 16. 25. 34. 35. 36. 69. 124 
Drenzek. [an 93 69, 151 
Drenzek, Tiffany 94 85. 157 
Driscoll, Marie 163 
Drury. Raymond 163 
Dubord. James 92 36. 51. 60. 71, 72, 145 
Dubord, Rebecca 94 157 
Duby. Michelle 19 
Ducharme, Amanda 92 145 
Duffy, Catherine 93 32, 48, 66, 95. 151 
Duffy. Keith 94 157 
Dugan. Matthew 92 145 
Duranl, Angle 94 78, 157 
Durzy, Alexander 92 36. 48, 51, 54, 55. 145 
Durzy, Peggy 163 

Dutil, Erica 91 16, 40, 42, 43. 51, 124. 130, 137, 142 
Dutil, Genevieve 93 22, 23, 107. 151 
Dutton, Cederia 93 151 
Dutton, Deborah 93 36, 151 
Dynak. Christopher 94 72. 157 



Miss Walinski and Mrs. Sanders 
share in the excitement with Mr. Lou 
Verani at his retirement party. 



Eaton, Neil 93 38, 151 

Edery. Michael 91 99, 126 

Ellis. Erica 91 126 

Emanuel. Nathan 93 69, 151 

Emerle. Malt 93 75, 151 

Emery, Tom 55 

Estrada. Lori 92 11. 32. 54, 55. 84. 145 

Everett. Suzanne 93 151 



Falzone. Kristen 91 II. 32. 33. 40. 64, 65, 84, 85, 
126 

Farnum, Tom 167 

Farrah. Charles 92 74, 145 

Farrell, John 91 58, 71, 126 

Farrell, Kimberly 94 157 

I crnanrles, Joao 91 22. 41. 126 

Fernandes. Teresa 93 151, 207 

Fernandez, Tania 91 32, 35, 36, 37, 51, 83, 126 

Fernandez, Vanessa 94 38, 40, 46. 83, 95. 157 

Ferreira, Jose 94 157 

Ferrindino. Jennifer 92 10, 42. 113. 145 

Ferris. Leslie 92 145 

Fidalgo. Chad 94 99. 157 

Field. Adam 91 126 

Fiore, Tina 92 32. 145 

Fisk. Elizabeth 163 

Fill. Heather 91 126 

Fills. Susan 163 

Fitzgerald. Brian 46, 158 

Fitzgerald, Colleen 93 1 I. 38. 41, 66, 84, 151, 207 

Fitzgerald, Keelv 91 3. 15, 16, 17. 24. 36. 37, 40. 42. 

12 6. 136. 169 
Flagg, Sharon 83 
Flynn, Frank 58 
Foley, Sean 91 58. 99, 126 
Fontaine, Tamara 93 151, 151 
Forcier. Andrew 92 34, 35, 48. 49. 96, 145 
Forcier, Joanne 163 
Fornier, Joanne 163 
Forranl, Kim I I, 84, 115 
Forranl, Kimberly 92 1 I, 46, 84, 115. 145 
Fortier, Robert 91 14, 15, 22, 36. 38, 39, 40, 41, 50, 

51, 96, 126, 127, 129, 130. 142 
Foss. Mistv 91 6. 7, 32, 40. 126 
Fournier. Jon 93 69. 151 
Frantzen. David 92 145 
Fratini. Christopher 161 
Frederick. Eric 145 
Freed, Meghan 38, 41, 43, 83, 158 
Freeman, Rejinald 91 126 
French, Dawn 158 
Fridlington, William 91 I, II. 16. 58. 92. 93. 133. 

126 
Fulton. Barbara 93 66, 76, 151 
Furst. Edward 91 1, 8, 58. 92. 93, 126, 127 



Gagliarducci, Jerome 58, 89, 145 

Gagnon, Catherine 91 15, 24, 25, 36, 38, 40, 41, 51, 

54, 5 5, 83. 126, 127, 142 
Gagnon, Jill 91 38. 126 
Gagnon, Mark 158 

Gagnon, Thomas 93 38. 43. 44, 69. 80, 81, 89, 151 
Gagnon, William 72, 73. 158. 160 
Gallagher. Stacy 158 
Galleher, James 91 56. 57. 126 
Galvin. Jamie 95, 158 
Galvin, Peter 91 129 
Garceau. Jodi 64. 65 
Gardner, Chander 155 
Gartner. Peter 163. 165 
Gaudette, Mara 32, 36, 40, 48, 51. 70, 80, 81, 105, 

145 
Gaulhier, Joe 167 
Gauthier, Lisa 91 129. 168 
Gawron. Brian 91 129 
Geissinger, Candida 163 
Geldart. Allison 91. 91. 145 
Gelinas, Kara 158 
Gentile, Carrie 93 32, 151 
Geromini. Jason 94 26, 158 
Giantris. Amy 1 19 
Gibb. Dave 58 
Gibb. Rebecca 7, 48. 
Gibson, Renee 38, 4 
Gil, Lori 56 
Gil. Lynn II, 56. 84, 
Gilbert. Thomas 93 15 
Giles. Scott 93 44. 69. 75, 15 
Gillen, Beth 56 
Gillen, Erin 93 56, 76, 151 



45 

145, 146 



116. '.45 




Gilligan. Kelly 93 41. 66. 76. 95. 151, 155 

Giordano, Derek 93 58. 71. 72, 108. 151, 207 

Girotli, James 163, 165 

Glover, Matthew 35, 51, 58, 71, 145 

Goettler, Robert 92 68. 69, 80, 81. 144, 146 

Golfieri, Junie 71 

Gonyea, Lory 161 

Goodhind. Brian 69 

Goodreau, Michael 93 151 

Goodrich, Charrice 93 151 

Gordon, Patricia 163 

Gotlehrer, Kevin 93 46, 54, 55, 74, 151 

Gouvin. Christy 161 

Gouvin, Rebecca 92 146 

Graham, Chad 93 36, 151 

Graham, Dana 94 75. 89. 

Gralenski, Andrea 94 158 

Gralenski, Steven 91 129 

Gralinski, Shawn 92 27, 35, 

Granaudo, Karen 92 76, 77, 

Granaudo, Victor 163 

Grande, Gladys 55 

Grant, Karla 163 

Grant. Rylan 91 25, 32. 36, 48, 50, 51, 68, 69, 74. 96, 

12 5, 129, 141 
Gravelin, Laura 92 46. 47. 66. 90. 91, 146 
Gray. Derek 92 38, 62. 146 
Greene. Juliet 91 43, 94, 95, 129 
Griffith, Bill 91. 91 
Grimaldi, Angela 93 151 
Grondalski, Brian 94 75, 102. 158 
Grono. Jennifer 92 36, 46, 48, 90, 91, 146 
Grono. Walter 93 9, 68, 69, 86. 151 
Grundstrom, Tim 93 36, 151 
Gullberg, Bridget 93 151 
Gural, Alexandra 93 151 
Gural, Shura 83 
Gutride. Alicia 91 110. 129 
Outride, Dana 93 151 
Guziec. Joan 44, 45, 163 



158 



146 
146 



H 



Hanson, Jonathan 94 38, 158, 161 

Hapgood, Carrie 93 32. 56. 83, 151 

Hapgood, Scott 91 16, 56, 57, 120, 129, 130, 131, 

142 
Harrington. Jennifer 91 10, 42. III. 120. 129. 132 
Harris, Becky 93 76, 77, 151 
Haryasz, Mark 94 38, 72, 158 
Hayes, Lindsay 94 158, 159 
Hebert. Angela 94 36. 76. 95, 158 
Hebert, Christopher 92 9. 32, 36, 48, 51, 71, 72, 89, 

146, 149 
Hebert, MaryJo 167 
Hebert. Thomas 91 129 
Hebert. Timothy 94 72. 73. 158 
Hedlund, Seth 92 6. 7, 36, 48, 146 
Heede, Alexis 91 6, 7, 25. 34, 35, 36, 37, 40, 43, 51, 

66, 76, 77, 120. 125, 129 
Heiney, Diane 164 
Henshon. Andrew 93 38, 43. 48, 49, 56, 57, 80. 81, 

88, 89, 151. 155 
Herbert, Jennifer 92 32, 38, 40, 75, 146 
Hersman. Andy 60 
Hertz, Steven 91 129 
Hick. Donna 164 
Hill, Frederick 92 68. 69. 146 
Hill. Naomi 158 

Hitchcock, Amy 93 32. 46. 66, 76, 152 
Hodge, Andrew 158 
Hofmann, Ronald 164 
Hogan, Shane 92 146 
Holdsworth. Clav 91 15, 51, 69, 129 
Holt. Russell 164 
Hopges, Sean I 58 
Houle, Kelly 158 
Howard, Brian 92, 93 
Howells, Amanda 91 38. 44. 51. 129 
Howells, Nathan 93 44, 46, 48, 62, 75, 152 
Hoyl, Laurel 158 

Hsiao. Melanic 93 36, 63, 76, 77. 152, 155 
Hsiao. Sarah 91 36. 51. 64. 77. 129. 141 
Hudson. Kelli 91 129. 133 
Hudson. Tonda 158 
Hughes. Kevin 92 58, 98, 99, 146 
Hughes. Krislen 92 32. 146 
Hupfer. Stephanie 91 127. 129. 132 
Hurst, Patrick 93 152, 168 
Huszar, Ryan 21 



146 



Haas, Michael 93 151 

Haggerty, Mark 60 

Hall. Eric 58 

Halloran, Brendan 92 54, 55, 74, 92. 103, 

Halloran, Brian 21, 163 

Hanks, David 93 27, 99, 151 

Hanrahan. Christopher 91 10. 11, 16. 38, 106, 129 

Hanscom, Daniel 164, 165, 166 

Hanson. Bonnie 92 29. 32, 36, 41, 78, 79, 107, 146 



Ingram. Kimberly 92 6. 7. 28, 32, 35, 40, 46, 51. 66, 
70, 80, 81. 114, 146 



200 INDEX 



Female Singer: Paula Abdul 

Television Show: In Living Color 

Restaurant: McDonalds 

Music Video: Cradle of Love 

Car: Porsche 

Movie: Ghost 

Male Singer: Billy Idol 



ngram. Kurl 91 6, 7, 131 
sham. April 91 120. 131 

sham. Mark 68. 69 



/ 



46 



lack. Stephen 93 55, 75, 99. 152 
Jackson. Michael 92 32, 33, 38, 40, 43 
Jackson, Rosemary 91, 158 
Jacobs. Stacy 91 43. 120. 131 

Jenkins. Sara 54, 55 

Jenkins, Willie 75 

Jenkinson, Amy 92 11, 27, 32, 78. 146. 147 

Jennings, Angus 93 36. 55. 152, 155 

Jerr, Matthew 93 152 

Jeserski, Diane 44, 45, 1 

Jodoin, Cory 158 

Johnson, Robert 21, 164 

Jordan. Robert 158 

Joyal, Eric 92 146 



164 



K 



Kacoyannkis. Marios 164 

Kanlor, Joshua 93 152 

Kapner, Jonathan 92 146 

Kasten, Jody 92 117, 144. 146 

Kellcy. Megan 38 

Kennedy, John 92 38, 146, 152 

Kennedy. Lisa 64, 65 

Kenney, Bruce 24, 164 

Kerbel, Christopher 22, 46, 89, 158 

Kerbel, Jonathan 92 22, 23, 58. 114. 116, 146 

Kertenis, Jason 93 98, 99, 152 

Ketschek, Michael 93 46, 62, 71, 72. 152 

Kibbe, Jonathan 92 146 

Kibbe. Martin 98, 99, 164, 165 

Kida, Terri 164 

Kilduff. Keith 72, 158 

Kilduff, Ken 21. 60. 61 

Kim, Eun-ah 92 146 

Kim, Lia 93 38. 152 

King, Janet 164 

King, Jeffrey 26, 38, 72, 96. 97, 158 

King. Mary 167 

King. Phillip 91 14. 15, 36, 96, 131 

Kingsbury, Elana 76, 77, 90, 91, 158, 161 

Kinnear. Jaime 158 

Kirchgessner, Christine 164 

Kirk. Rosemary 38. 91, 158. 166 

Kirschling, Robert 162. 164 

Kisner. Kristie 92 10. 62. 63, 76, 77, 90, 91, I' 

Kline, Susan 164 

Kober, Samantha 91 14, 43, 64. 76. 77. 131 

Kober. William 164 

Koppelmann. Brett 91 131 

Korzon. Scott 72. 158. 159 

Kosek. Jason 72, 158 

Kotomski, Jennifer 46, 90, 158 

Kolomski. Mary 91 35. 131 

Kozub, David 91 37, 41, 131, 133 

Kozub. Paul 93 56. 57, 86, 152 

Kraus, Amy 92 II, 32, 37, 38, 41, 56, 84, 146 

Krawczyk. Sacha 158 

Kritzky, Dale 91 131 

Kulis, Mark 92 27, 46. 88, 89, 146 

Kumming, Rob 68. 69 

Kurpaska. Stacey 91 120, 131 

Kuselias, Chris 21, 60, 61 

Kvvong. Marsha 158 



131 

113. 146 



L'Hcureux. Breanne 13. 78. 95. 156. 158, 161 

Labadorf. David 93 32, 58, 75, 151. 152 

LaCamera, Johanna 91 38, 131 

Laferriere, Michelle 91 32, 40, 131 

Laflamme. Gloria 164 

Lague, Robert 93 152 

Lagunowich, Alexander 164, 165 

Lambert. Alan 158 

Lambert. Carolyn 164 

Landry, Michael 91 38. 

Langdon, Robert 92 II. 

LaPierre. Mary 54, 55 

LaPierre. Nicole 93 27. 32, 36, 37, 43. 46, 151, 152, 

153, 155 
LaPlante, Cherie 92 146, 158, 161 
Lapointe, Felicia 93 152 
Laraway, Matthew 46, 72, 73, 89, 158 
Laraway. Melissa 93 36, 38, 40, 152 
Larro, Suzanne 161 
Latino, Raffelena 164 
Lavin, David 164 
Lavoie, Jeffrey 92 146 
Lavoie, Roger 72, 158 

Leahey, Elizabeth 93 32, 46, 63, 78. 95. 152 
Leccese, Lisa 91 131 
Lech. Jen 20 

Ledoux, Michelle 93 32. 38, 150, 152 
Legcr. Allan 92 147 
Legcre, Roy 93 60, 63, 89, 152 
Lempart, John 75. 104, 158 
Leone, Angie 167 
LcRay, Erin 92 11. 84. 103. 147 
Leritz, Elizabeth 92 6, 7, 27, 32, 35, 46, 51, 66, 83, 

92, 93, 147 
Lessard, Pamela 91, 158 
Leung, Michelle 54, 55 
Lewenczuk, Jason 92 147 
Lewicki, Eddie 167 
Lewis. Celeste 1 58 

Lewis, Katherine 91 22, 23, 32, 38, 40, 43, 69, 131 
Lewis. Lisa 91 22, 23, 38, 40, 131, 133, 139 
Lewis. Shiela 164 
Liberty. Maribeth 91 14. 131 
Liese, Amy 92 6. 7, 42, 43, 64, 90, 91, 
Liese, Scott 75, 88, 89, 158 
Ligarski, Carol 164 
Ligarski, Michael 60 
Little, Jennifer 92 27, 36. 66, 76, 106, 
Little. MaryAnn 164 

Logan, Christine 93 16. 32. 36. 38, 40, 56, 78, 152 
Logan. John 164 

Lopcr. Alexis 92 10, 56, 76, 77, 147 
Lucarelle, Christopher 92 36. 37, 56, 57, 144, 147 
Lucarelle, Jennifer 91 3, 16, 18, 24, 36, 37, 40. 42. 

43, 56, 124, 130, 131, 168 
Luczek. Michael 92 147 
Luczek, Steven 158 
Lussier, Paul 91 132 
I ui.. -II, Melissa 91 24, 48. 49. 132, 136 
Lydon, Jessica 16, 90. 158 
Lynch, Christopher 92 13, 42, 86, 87, 147 
Lynch. Jen 91 12. 83, 132, 132. 142 
Lynch, Kathleen 91 132 
Lyonnais, Nikki 66 




147 



147 



M 



MacCauley. Beverly 165 

MacFarlane. Chris 93 58, 75, 152 

Mack, Cathy 93 95, 152, 154 

Mackenzie, Scott 158 

Mackie. Jennifer 93 32. 38. 40. 66, 84, 85, 152, 154 

Mageau, Michael 89, 158 

Maharme, Krina 91 132 

Mahoney. Christine 92 147 

Makuch, Treena 91 127, 132 

Malcckas, Catherine 165 




BUSINESS SECRETARY for Min- 
nechaug, Louella Searles, retired this 
December after many years of ser- 
vice. 



USING HIS TIME wisely, senior 
Eric Schmitt works during lunch peri- 
od in the hallway. Eric spent much 
time preparing for Model Congress 
debates. 



Maleckas, Judy 93 40. 63. 151, 152 

Maloncy. David 161 

Maltby, Kevin 93 29, 32. 36. 38, 46, 71, 152, 207 

Maltbv, Monica 91 11, 15, 32, 35, 36, 38, 46, 51, 

123, 125 , 132. 141 
Manegre. Charity 92 66, 94, 95, 106, 146, 147 
Manning, Kerry 91 3, 15. 16. 24, 40, 41. 54, 55, 76, 

77. 1 25. 132 
Manning. Lisa 66 
Manning. William 93 152 
Marcelynas, Lisa 38, 158 
Mariani, Mary 165 
Marini, Susan 93 150, 152 
Markham, Jennifer 91 132 
Marrero, Martin 92 147 
Martin, Catherine 36, 161 
Martin. Clarence 92 36. 43, 90, 91, 145, 147 
Marvaso, Sara 92 43. 66. 147 
Marvici. Nadine 165 

Mascaro. Gregory 92 38. 46, 56. 57. 92. 93, 147 
Mascaro, Leonard 93 44, 152 
Mascaro, Michael 92 147 
Mather, Dawn 19 
Matthews. Corey 72. 158 
Matthews, Jason 93 38, 69. 152 
McAleer. Katherine 41. 158 
McCarthv, Jennifer 91 132 
McCarthy. Karen 93 38. 56. 109. 152 
McCarthy. Robert 165 
McCrae. Chris 93 152 
McCray. Louis 92 70. 71, 72. 147 
McCurry, Michael 92 58, 147 



INDEX 201 



McCurry, Sara 85, 102. 158 

McDiarmid. Patricia 95, 96, 165 

McDiarmid, Robert 11, 96, 158 

McDonald, Erin 92 147 

McDonald, George 92 147 

McFarland, Bryan 75, 96, 97, 158 

McFarland, Scott 91 15, 56. 57, 125, 128, 132. 142 

McCahan. Sarah 91 23, 41. 70, 93, 132 

McGill. Alexandar 75. 89, 158 

McGranahan. Lynne 93 117, 152 

McGrath, Jim 93 62, 63, 152 

McKinnon, Brent 21 

McMahon. Gerald 91 34, 35, 132 

McMahon, Michelle 165 

McMinn, Nanhee 91 17, 25, 32. 34, 35, 37, 40, 125, 

132, 141 
Mecure, Jessica 85 
Meisner. Chad 58 

Meisner, Steven 91 14, 15, 38, 58, 71, 132 
Melcher, Bob 19 
Melcher, Darren 91 132 
Menard, Ann 158 
Mendrala, Jeff 19 
Mendrala, Jen 19 
Mercier, Corinne 165 
Mercure, Jennifer 93 85, 152 
Mercure, Jessica 158 
Merigian, Lisa 92 147 
Merigian. Michael 72, 99, 158 
Metzger. William 75, 89, 158. 159, 160 
Meyer, Kristen 158 

Michaelski, Jody 92 32, 38, 40, 48, 147, 148 
Mikolajczuk, Steven 99, 158 
Mikuszewski. Amy 93 32, 95, 152 
Mikuszewski, Paul 91 16. 96, 132 
Miller, Elaine 93 152 
Miller, Harold 66, 80, 165 
Miller, Ryan 38, 158 
Miner, Ed 58, 154 
Minnon, Deanna 91 123, 132 
Miodowski. Robin 91 134 
Mitchell. Bill 168 

Mitchell. Kristie 93 II, 84, 85, 108, 152 
Mitchell. Lois 11. 84 
Mitchell. William 165 
Mondor, Brian 93 62. 152 
Moody. Grelchen 93 32. 36, 38. 83. 153, 155 
Moon, Peter 75, 158 
Mooney. Russell 43, 58, 71, 72. 89, 165 
Moore, Alison 93 32, 38, 46. 80, 153 
Moore. Gregory 75, 158 
Moore, Jeffrey 92 36, 48. 80, 147. 149 
Moore. Sallie 165 
Morell, Loraine 167 
Moriarty, Kay 85, 158 
Moriarly, Kevin 91 14, 38, 108, 134 
Moriarty, Larry 167 
Moriarty, Patrick 98, 99, 158 
Morin, Ransom 155 
Morrissey, John 71, 165 
Morse, Melissa 93 32, 42, 46, 56. 153 
Mortiarty, Kevin 123 

Morton. Rachel 91 32. 36, 40, 46, 125, 134, 139 
Morton, Sara 76, 158 
Mosellen. Chris 46, 72. 92. 93, 158 
Mosellen, Kathleen 165 

Mosier, Vail 91 24, 36, 37, 40, 51, 64, 77, 134, 141 
Motyka. Eric 158 
Motyka. Shawn 75, 158 
Motyl. Jaime 158 

Muldrew, Ben 93 38, 41, 56, 57. 106, 153 
Mumper, John 92 147 
Murphy, Jeff 93 71, 72, 153 
Murphy, Karrie 91 14, 38, 134 
Murray, Jessamy 92 147 
Musiak, Brian 89. 158 
Musselman, Byron 165 
Musselman, Ray 49 
Myers, Kenneth 72, 158, 159 
Myers. Randy 68, 69 



N 



Nakashian, Lauren 92 147, 149 

Napolitan, Shiloh 85. 109, 158 

Nelson. Erik 91 134 

Nelson, Kristin 93 76, 77, 94, 95, 152, 153 

Nelson, Matthew 91 16, 36, 38, 41, 51, 54, 55, 81, 

119, 12 3, 134 
Ng. Richard 92 80. 147 
Nicole. Melissa 93 153 
Nicolt, Megan 38, 40, 41, 148 
Nicdel, Katherine 165 
Nicderfringer. Julie 54, 55 
Niziolek. Adam 93 69, 71, 72, 153 
Nizioiek, Martha 165 

Noble. Griff 36. 38. 48. 55, 80, 81. 92, 93, 116, 141 
Noble. Sandra 165 
Noonan, Paula 165 
Noonan. Ryan 72, 158 
Nooney. Renee 92 148 
Norcross. Troy 91 134 
Nordstrom. Neil 60. 61. 75, 86, 87, 88, 148 
Norman. Joe 167 
Norowski. Mary 167 
Nolarangclo. Rosemary 165 
Now.ik. Thaddeus 92 148 
Nowakowski, Gregory 91 134 



o 



O'Brien, Kealy 92 76, 77, 90. 91. 148 

O'Callaghan, Christian 158 

O'Callaghan, Jeremiah 92 148 

O'Connell, William 91 44, 134 

O'Connor. Donna 165 

O'Connor. Tara 93 32. 36. 78, 153. 155 

O'Donnell, Sheila 92 63. 148. 149 

O'Neil, Agnes 167 

O'Neil. Clare 165 

O'Neil. Robert 92 42, 60, 63. 74, 148 

Ober. Chanda 92 148 

Ober, Kim 93 36. 83, 153 

Oglesby, Bryan 91 37, 68, 69, 71, 123, 134 

Opitz, Paul 158 

Orr. Rebecca 92 11. 148 

Orzulak. Thomas 44, 165 

Osman, David 158 

Osmond. Patricia 165 

Overton. Sean 93 69, 71, 96, 153 




Radio Station: 107.3 

Rock Group: Aerosmith 

Drink: Coke 

Subject: Math 

Magazine: Sports Illustrated 

Store: K Mart 

Actress: Roseanne Barr 



39, 



Pabich. Diana 54, 55 

I'afiiiin. Robert 91 69, 134 

Pafumi. Tracy 92 148 

Page, Karena 94 160 

Paige, Clark 93 153 

Paige, Doug 74, 92, 93 

Pajak. Terri 93 106, 152. 153 

Palermo, Shamus 161 

Paolone. Jeffrey 92 109, 148 

Paquette, Sharon 94 160 

Paris, Nicole 93 153 

Parisan, Jonathan 94 160 

Parke, Doug 58 

Parker. Dineen 92 148 

Parker. Luke 91 134 

Paroia, Amy 92 148 

Patel. Rinku 91 134, 136 

Patterson. Jolene 93 153 

Patullo, Jennifer 94 85, 160 

Pease, Pamela 165 

Peck, Cara 93 10, 76, 153 

Pederzani, Jenn 63 

Pelouze, Brigitle 91 38, 39, 40, 41, 134, 138. 

142 

Penso, Marc 92 148 
Penso, Matthew 155 
Pepin, Nicole 91 44, 134 
Perkins, Chip 72, 73. 98, 99, 160 
Perkins, Kara 92 6, 7, 32. 35, 46, 48, 66, 83, 148 
Perman, Jill 92 148 
Perotti. I mi- Aim 91 134 
Perri, Bryson 92 148 
Person, Becki 93 153 
Pessolano. Amy 94 160 
Petzold, Gary 120. 122, 166 
Pfohl. Shannon 93 153 
Phaneuf, Russell 94 160 
Phillips. Stacy 93 153 
Piecuch, Stephen 94 38, 96. 160 
Pierce. Susan 91 9, 46. 83, 108, 134 
Pietryka, Stephanie 92 66. 83. 90, 148 
Pikul. Christina 161 
Pilarcik. Aaron 92 69. 80, 81, 148 
Pincince, Kelly 91 32, 38, 137 
Piscioneri. Andre 94 75. 96. 160 
Plowe. Mary 93 43. 153 
Polchlopek, Patricia 153, 166 
Polga. Katherine 166 
Poole. Wendy 92 44. 148 
Poremba. Alan 92 68. 69. 70. 71 
Poremba. Michael 93 62. 71. 72, 
Pori, Mischa 93 153 
Porter. Nancy 166 
Post. Daniel 94 38, 160 
Potvin, Dominique 93 83. 153 
Poulin, Jim 71, 79 
Pridemore, Robert 92 44, 45, 62 
Prochnow, Natalie 93 38, 153 
Provencher, Dave 94 75, 160 
Pryzbylowicz, John 166 
Pytko. Jason 93 153, 155 
Pyzocha, Lori 94 78, 160 



104, 148 
153 



Q 



Quackenbush, Mindy 166 
Quin, Erica 94 38. 160 
Quinlivan, Christopher 94 72. 73. 160 
Quirk. Stephanie 92. 93 

Quist, Amber 91 11. 14, 15, 36, 40, 46, 51. 56. 84, 
85, 12 4. 137 




FIRST AID is a useful course to 
have under your belt. Molly Cesan 
learns how to give mouth to mouth 
resuscitation. 



PLANNING their route of attace 
at open house are William Perkins 
and Joseph Raczka. Many parents 
rely on maps to guide them. 



202 INDEX 



R 



Raczka, Gail 85 
Raczka, Katie 21, 56 

Raczka, Kellie 92 22, 23. 27, 32, 63, 92, 93, 116. 144, 
- 14 8 
Radnor, Joel 94 160 
Radwilowicz, Elizabeth 166 
Raffa. Lauren 94 38. 40, 41. 160 
Raschilla. Lisa 92 148. 149 
Reavev, Tara 91 6, 7, 35. 36, 40. 46. 47. 56. 83. 135, 

137, 140 
Reich, Michael 93 62. 63. 92, 93, 153 
Renn. Brandy 66 
Richards, Daniel 94 160 
Riel. Joan 166 
Rigney, John 93 98, 99, 153 
Rihm, Molly 21, 56 
Ritchter, Lori 91 10. 43. 137 
Roache. Sandra 92 148 
Roberts. Brett 161 

Roberts. Michael 93 32. 46. 62. 99, 153 
Robinson, Alyssa 94 160 
Robinson, Cindy 20 

Robinson. Jason 91 13. 14. 52. 58. 74. 137. 142 
Robinson, Kristie 161 
Robinson, Margaret 107, 166 
Rocheford, Chris 19 
Rodamilans, Caetano 92 48, 69, 148 
Rodgers, Peter 92 46, 48, 58, 71, 72, 90, 91, 116. 148 
Rogers, Brian 92 148 
Rohan. Brendan 91 137 
Roj. Stephanie 92 63. 64. 82. 83, 148 
Rooney, Diane 110, 166 
Root. Nathanial 91 25. 41, 69. 106. 137. 140 
Rose. Douglas 91 58, 59, 137 
Rosenthal. Dean 92 32. 34. 35, 40. 42. 43, 48. 54, 55, 

117 , 148 
Ross, Amy 92 148 
Ross. Annette 91 137 
Ross. Betsy 11. 66, 84, 153 
Ross. Dickie 167 
Ross. Elizabeth 91 137 
Ross. Jennifer 91 137 
Ross. Liz 117 
Ross, Walter 167 

Rothschild. Heather 91 32. 38. 40, 106. 137 
Rowe. Jason 94 160 
Roy. Michael 93 153 
Roy. Paula 94 160 
Royer, Ray 93 74, 75. 99, 151, 153 
Rover. Robert 91 137 
Ruggeri. David 91 137 
Ruscio, Kara 92 1 1. 27, 56, 84, 148 
Ruscio. Tom 20 
Ryder, Tricia 94 160 
Rys, Tony 54, 55 



Sabbides. Jason 94 160 

Sagalyn, David 94 72, 89, 159. 160 

Sagalyn. Eric 93 46, 58, 92, 93, 153 

Sagcr, Bethany 92 I I, 27, 32. 34, 35, 38, 40. 41. 51. 

148 
Sagcr, Joyce 150. 166 
Sager, Melanic 1 1 
Sala. Chris 21 
Sala. Joe 69. 71, 72 
Salamone. Anita 92 95, 148 
Samble. Jen 64, 65 
Sanders. Jen 66 
Sanders. Sandra 166 
Santiago. Jennifer 93 150, 153 
Santos, Yammira 92 149 
Sargent, Cathy 93 26. 32. 33. 38. 40. 153 
Sargent, Mike 32, 55 

Sarno, Christine 93 10, 22. 32. 40, 46, 76, 77, 153 
Sartori, Maria 93 32, 40, 48, 56, 95. 153 
Sartwell. Scott 93 58, 74, 153 
Sauve. Jeanne 166 
Savoie, Charles 92 36, 148 
Scagliarini, Christina 92 36, 148 
Scatolini. Bill 72 
Scharl. Stephen 165, 166 
Schmitt. Colin 94 89, 160 
Schmilt, Eric 91 16, 34, 137, 142 
Schmuck. Stephen 91 68, 69. 71, 137 
Schock. Thomas 94 160 
Schofield. Earl 20 
Schofield, Nathan 93 69, 153 
Schofield. Sarah 94 38. 160 
Scott. Richard 166 

Scott. Ryan 91 32. 38. 40. 41. 71. 137 
Searles, Luella 27 

Selvia. David 94 46, 80. 92, 93, 160 
Sersanti. Frank 44. 166 
Sha». Jennifer 91 32. 38. 40. 51. 137 
Shay. Larry 58 
Shea. Constance 104, 166 
Shcehan. Florence 166 
Shepard, Jodi 92 56, 85, 110, 148 
Shcphcrdson. Phil 49 

Shcran. Kevin 94 38, 80, 81. 89. 159. 160 
Shoum. Kimberly 94 160 
Shults. Dana 92 63. 148 
Shumate. Todd 92 II. 58. 74. 92. 93. 149 
Sibilia. Carol 166 
Sikes, Mark 41 
Silva. Robert 165, 166 
Silveira. Connie 167 
Simons. Amity 93 35. 40. 48, 83, 153 
Sirois, Barbara 48, 167 
Sitnik. MaryLou 51, 167 
Skala, Daniel 91 71. 124. 139 



Skiba. Joshua 94 38, 75. 160 

Skiff. Judy 93 153 

Slatcher, Virginia 94 160 

Smart. Heather 94 160 

Smead. Christopher 93 38, 69. 80, 81, 154 

Smith. Amy 93 36. 46. 83. 154 

Smith. Andrew 93 96. 101. 150. 154 

Smith. Brian 91 139 

Smith, Colby 94 80, 160 

Smith. Gwcn 93 154 

Smith. Kara 93 63. 154 

Smith. Kevin 93 38. 75, 154 

Smith, Kim 18 

Smith. Noel 21. 60 

Smith. Scott 93 46, 98. 99. 154 

Smith. Shane 92 149 

Smith. Tara 91 139 

Snow, Don 75 

Soja. Mark 94 160 

Solaroli. Heidi 91 14. 139 

Solzak, Susan 91 139 

Soukup. Craig 92 149 

Soukup. Jason 94 161 

Soule. Daniel 93 154 

Soule, David 93 154 

Soule, Leah 91 48, 51, 139 

Southworth. Rita 167 

Souza, Jeremy 93 154 

Spear, Amy 93 32, 38, 46. 63. 83. 154 

Spencer. Richard 40, 167 

Sperrv, Brooke 93 32, 42. 43, 154 

Spillane. Michael 93 52. 58. 74. 153. 154. 207 

Spinowitz. Marc 58 

Squegha. Will 18 

St Pierre. Russell 92 149 

Stahelek. Jonathan 91 98. 99. 139 

Stahlberg. Shaina 93 154. 207 

Starr. Jon 62 

Sternberg. Karl 167 

Stevenson. Daniel 94 72. 161 

Slirlon, Cynthia 167 

Stitsinger, Craig 92 75, 149 

Stocks. George 167 

Stolarcyk. Courtney 94 38. 90. 161 

Stone. Martin 91 139 

Stratlon. Meg 93 154 

Streeter, Carl 91 43. 139 

Stuart. Amy 91 139 

Sullivan. Amy 64. 65 

Sulliian, Ellen 91 36. 83, 109. 139 

Sulliian. James 91 69. 71. 98. 99, 128, 130, 139, 140, 

142 
Sullivan. Lynn 167 
Sullivan. Thomas 94 161 
Sullivan, Tim 54, 55 
Sutton, Kay-Kay 10, 43, 110 
Sutton, Shauna 92 36, 38. 40. 42. 43, 48. 148. 149 
Sweeney. Darlene 167 
Sweeney. Michael 93 155 
Swope. Betty 167 

Szafarowicz. William 92 69. 75. 149 
Szczebak. Lynn 91 14. 139 



Tabb, Kevin 94 99. 161 

Takorian. Rebecca 91 10. 36. 43. 44. 45. 139 

Talbot. Carrie 91 80, 139 

Tarantino. Anne 93 32. 38, 56. 155 

Tarantino. Christopher 93 10, II. 29. 32, 38. 41. 71. 

72. 106. 153. 155 
Taylor. Sara 91 11. 15. 51. 64. 65. 90. 91. 109. 128. 

139 
Taylor. Shawn 93 32. 46, 155 
Tccce, Tammy 92 149 
Tenbrook. David 94 72. 159. 161 
Tencza. Elizabeth 92 38. 40, 41. 46. 146. 149 
Tessier. Danielle 94 161 
Thayer. Barbara 167 
Theocles. Mary 94 161 
Thiffaull. Stephanie 92 110. 149 
Thomas. Jason 92 27, 75. 149 
Thomas. Otis 94 48. 161 

Thorpe. Robert 92 35, 43, 62, 80, 81, I 14. 144. 149 
Tichacek. Kalherine 94 161 
Tienken. Lisa 91 120. 139 
Tipaldi, Allison 94 92. 93. 161 
Tipaldi. Arthur 16. 64. 74. 165. 166. 167 
Toman. Lori 91 6. 7. 27. 139 
Topor. Scott 92 96. 149 
Toulson. Amy 93 155 
Tousignanl, Ann 167 
Tousignant, Terence 91 II. 15. 20. 22, 23, 25. 32. 36. 

38. 40. 51. 54. 55. 74. 140. 141. 162 
Tranghesc. Anthony 92 9, 32, 62. 149 
Tranghese. C alii 91 141 
Tranghese. John 94 161 
Trebbe. JM 167 
Triggs. Patrick 94 161 
Trimmer. Gregory 42. 167 
Trivedi. Anjana 63 
Trolio. Rita 92 31, 149 
Tromblav. Jana 92 66. 67. 83. 149 
Tromblay. Mark 94 46. 80. 81, 88. 89, 161 
Trombley. Carol 167 
Trombley. Robert 94 89. 161 
Tromblv. Courtney 94 76. 90. 91. 161 
Trombly, Ryan 92 42, 43, 48. 49. 68. 69, 80. 81, 89. 

149 
Trov. James 91 12. 58. 59. 74, 92, 93, 141. 142 
Trov. Lauren 93 9. 32. 38. 40. 64. 65. 76. 77. 84. 92. 

93. 155 
Truesdale. Daniel 91 16. 86. 126. 141 
Truitl. Frances 91 10. 38. 39, 42, 141 
Truitl. Karen 91 128. 136. 141 
Tumey, Christopher 94 161 
Tumey. Scott 94 161 

Turcotte. Jill 38, 66, 67, 80, 81. 90. 91. 128 
Turcotte, Nina 94 10. 80. 81. 90. 161 
Turgeon. Jennifer 92 149 




PROUDLY displaying awards of 
jrevious Model Congress delega- 
tus are this years members. They 
ue Miss Brewer, Eric Schmitt, Court- 



ney Ware. Dean Rosenthal, Becky 
Beacom, Bethany Sager, Brad Bur- 
nette. Mary Wallace, Gerry McMa- 
hon. Roger Burnelle, NanHee 



McMinn, Jed Draper, Andrea Che- 
chile, Alexis Heede, Matt Glover, and 
Drew Forcier. 



INDEX 203 




Song: Do Me 

Soap Opera: General Hospital 

Actor: Mel Gibson 

Food: Chinese 

Comic: Calvin and Hobbes 

Teacher: Mrs. Polchlopek 

Sport: Hockey 




U 



Urledgc, Dan 19 
Urzedowski, Scott 94 99, 161 



V 



Valentine, Sara 93 36, 38, 40, 43, 67, 80, 81, 150, 

152, 1 55 
Vardakis, Kimberly 167 
Vecchio, Christine 93 36, 38, 43, 83, 155 
Vedovelli, Jason 93 155 
Veideman, Mary 91 32, 40, 51. 141 
Veideman. William 92 10. 42. 58. 149 
Venne. Kimberly 91 14. 112, 141 
Verdon. Marcel 93 58, 155 
Vermette, Jarod 93 38, 155 
Verville, Slacey 92 149 
Vickers, Sonya 48, 167 
Vonflalern. Erin 94 102, 161 



w 



Wagner, William 94 161 

Waite, Marc 94 161 

Walbridge, Kelli 93 10, 32, 40. 66. 76. 90. 154. 155 

Wallace. Mary 91 14, 34, 35, 37, 48, 51, 135, 141 

Wallace. Matthew 91 62. 141 

Walling, Linda 93 38, 40, 41, 43, 54, 55, 83, 151, 

154, 15 5 
Walling, Thomas 91 41, 42, 43, 44, 137, 141 
Ward. David 91 141 
Ware, Courtney 91 14, 32, 35. 40, 92, 93, 114, 137, 

141 
Warga, Jesse 93 27, 151, 155 
Washington, David 94 161 
Watts, Michelle 91 110, 141 
Wawrzonek, Henry 92 69. 71. 89, 149 
Wegiel, Kenneth 92 69, 80, 149 
Wegiel, Sharon 94 161 
Weinberg, Sean 93 155 
Weiner, Jennifer 94 161 
Welch, Jack 60 
Welch, Kara 91 15, 16, 32. 35. 36, 40, 46. 78, 79, 

137, 141 
Weller, Bryan 94 72, 161 
Whalen, Andrew 167 
White, Cara 93 155 
White, Constance 167 
White, Eric 92 60, 63, 71, 89. 149 
White, Laura 66 
Whitehill, Gayle 167 
Whitfield. Neal 91 140, 141 
Whiting. Bryce 21, 58. 59, 120 
Whittle, Erica 91 129, 141 
Wholley, Heather 92 32. 64. 65, 149 
Whollcv. Tara 56 



DISCUSSING Roman history 
with her Latin 3-4 class, Mrs. Marilyn 
Ats captures her students' interest. 



Willoughby. Lauren 92 149. 168 

Wilson, Joe 92 10, 42, 58, 149 

Wilson. Stacy 20 

Wing, Curtis 166, 167 

Wing, Michael 108 

Winn, Jeremy 58, 75 

Winn, Jessica 66 

Winseck, Adam 94 38, 46. 161 

Withington, Sue 18, 66 

Wolford, Jeanne 27. 167 

Wong. Julie 17, 32, 38, 40, 41, 43 

Wood, Chris 62 

Worthley, John 167 

Wright, Amy 94 76, 161 

Wright. Chris 71, 72, 98. 99 

Wright. Jeff 62 

Wrona. Christine 167 

Wuerlhele, Lane 94 92, 93. 161 

Wyman, Scott 21 

Wyzik. Kimberly 92 32, 46, 103, 149 



Yim, Seoug 94 161 
Young, Elizabeth 38, 40 
Young, Jeffrey 92 58, 71, 149 
Young, Jennifer 91 141 
Young. Jonathan 94 161 



Zadrozny. Leah 92 149 

Zafl-Weissman. Matt 32, 69. 96 

Zahr, Karen 92 II, 27, 29. 32, 149 

Zajac, Pamela 91 10, 36, 38, 40, 43, 51, 133, 141 

Zanfagna. Anne-Marie 10. 43. 104, 105. 167 

Zepke, Amanda 92 64, 65. 103. 149 

Zhe, Michelle 92 38, 42. 69, 149 

Ziemba. Jim 99 

Zimmerman, Kristel 92 56, 95. 149 

Ziobro, Stephanie 92 69, 106. 149 

Zollner. Jessica 92 149 



■:"■: 




204 INDEX 



FINISHING CJP an assignment, 
Becky Orr takes advantage of home- 
room time. 



TAKING time out to nurse an in- 
jury, Kandy Belcher ices a sore ankle. 



$15 PATRONS 



Jeanne H. Wolford, R.N. Best wishes to the 
Class of '91. The 18th and last, but not 
least I've servedl 

Best Wishes from Hampden Village Pre- 
school 

Mrs. Patricia Donovan, Best wishes to a great 
class! 

Gale D. Candaras, Selectman, Congratula- 
tions Class of '91. 

Pamela Getchell, School Committee Member, 
"Carpe Diem" 

The Bradbury FAmily, Phil, Dotti, Anne and 
Karen 

Terry and Poppy Nelson, Congratulations 
Class of '91. We'll miss you! 

Rice's Fruit Farm. Congratulations to the 
Class of *91. 

Melissa A. Laferriere. A member of the Class 
of '99, extends best wishes to the great 
Class of '91. 

John, Lynn and Ellen Field, Class of 1991, 
Best wishes for bright futures. 

John and Judy Quist, "Luck: When prepara- 
tion meets opportunity." Good Luck, Class 
of*91. 

Congratulations Kris, Mom and Robin 



1991 FALCON STAFF 



Co-Editors-In-Chief 

Monica Maltby, Layout 
Sara Taylor, Copy 

Student Life Editors 

Kealy O'Brien 
Jana Tromblay 

Sports Editor 

Sara Taylor 

Activities Editors 

Brad Burnerte 
Scott McFarland 

Academics 

Nicole Bluteau 
Andrea David 
Kara Ruscio 



Community Editors 

Jenny Arnoman 
Kelli Hudson 

Senior Section 

Kealy O'Brien 
Jana Tromblay 

Junior Section 

Bethany Sager 
Elizabeth Tencza 

Sophomore Section 

Kandy Belcher 
Bonnie Jo Hanson 
Karen Zahr 

Freshman Section 

Liz Agnew 
Kristin Belcher 
Shiloh Napolitan 



Faculty Section 

Trista de Sousa 

LPVEC 

Keely Fitzgerald 

Typists 

Trista de Sousa 
Shauna Sutton 
Sara Taylor 
Jana Tromblay 

General Staff 

Mike Carter 
Matt Casey 
Rob Fortier 
Cory Jodoin 
Jennifer Little 
Kerry Manning 
Kara Perkins 
Kellie Raczka 



With Special Thanks . . . 

So many people have contributed to make this book 
possible. We are grateful to each. Whether someone brought 
us hockey scores or wrote an article, each effort helped to 
complete this book. We are sincerely appreciative of all 
efforts. Special thanks to Brian Borsari for his numerous 
senior section, student life and activities articles. Brian 
always wrote well and on a moment's notice; Vail Mosier, 
Rachel Morton, and Bill Fridlington for pictures for the 
senior section; all the seniors who responded to all the 
questionnaires for their section; Leah Zadrozny for the article 
on mediation, although it was not used; Jodi Sheperd for the 
computers /typing article; Michele Asselin for the child study 
article; Becky Beacom for the science article; Dean Rosenthal 
for the article on music although we didn't use it, and for his 
help on the tennis article; Steph Ziobro for the article on art; 
Anne Marie Zanfagna for the peer counseling photos; Nicole 
LaPierre for the pictures of sophomores and Key Club; Katie 
Lewis for the pictures of Drama Club; Andrew Henshon for 
the pictures of the As Schools Match Wits Team; Chip 
Perkins for the pictures of freshmen; Andrea Chechile for the 
pictures of International Club; Chanda Ober for the Prom 
article; Anne Berte for the swimming article; Miss Cascio for 
the swimming pictures and scores; Michelle Zhe for writing 
an article never used; Jeff King for writing the freshman 
football article; John Rigney for writing the hockey article; 
Mrs. McMahon for her help with the varsity basketball 
article and for the chocolate chip cookies she provided; Mara 
Gaudette for her help with the cross country article; and Neil 
Nordstrom for his help with the baseball article. Special 
thanks also to Mrs. Sager for faithfully devoting countless 
hours and weekends to the completion of the book and for 
the patience and time she has given unselfishly to us, her 
staff. 



Colophon 

The staff of the 1991 Falcon worked with Jostens Ameri- 
can Yearbook Company of Topeka, Kansas to complete this 
9x12 book of 208 pages. Don Lendry, our Jostens repre- 
sentative, was an invaluable help to us. For the first time 
ever at Minnechaug, the staff worked together as a class and 
received full course credit for their efforts. Although the 
1 99 1 staff lacked experience, their industrious efforts made 
up for it. 

The design and cover were created by Monica Maltby. The 
cover photo was taken by Kevin Maltby from Rice's Apple 
Orchard in September, 1990. The theme copy was written 
by Sara Taylor. The back end sheet photo was taken by Chris 
Qrenier. 

The type style on the cover and on all theme pages is 
Century Book Condensed 55. The captions on all of these 
pages is Benguiat Bold 48 and are preceded by a dropped 
initial. 

Secondary color was used in the early theme pages and in 
the first half of student life. It was pantone paper submitted 
as artwork to be processed as four color pictures. Through- 
out the book, Times Roman Bold 45, Korinna Bold 22, 
Century Book Condensed 55, and Palatino Bold 34 are used. 

I would like to express special thanks to the late Colonel 
Charles Savedge, "Father of Modern Yearbooks." He is 
mainly responsible for the growth and changes that have 
been made in the Minnechaug Yearbook over the past four 
years. Through his enthusiastic and motivating lectures, he 
has taught many students throughout the United States. His 
inspirational words will be missed dearly by all whose lives 
he has touched, as he has mine. 
-M.M. 



INDEX 205 





206 CLOSING 




ROJECT adventure 

I students Derek 

Giordano , Mike 

Spill. me, Maureen Dempsey, 

Colleen Fitzgerald, and Shana 

Stahlberg wrap up the class. 

FTER a rough class of 

J\ Project Adventure is 

wrapped up, Teresa 

Fernandes returns to the trials 

and tribulations of school. 



!JM *m 




RAPPED UP in physi- 
Vy cal therapy, Kevin 
Maltby tries to 
strengthen his arm, which he 
broke during fall football prac- 
tice. 



CLOSING 207 




208 



=5?rra: 



rC^CT 



■m - 



Til 










.'-■-.1 






w its* 



§•€ 




:-»» jfe 






H